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128

If you're republishing content (code, or an explanation of code) that you found on Stack Overflow in a blog post or article, the attribution must be public as well. You must1: A) clearly indicate that it comes from the Stack Exchange Network, and give credit to the author by B) linking to the original answer/question, C) clearly indicating the author(s)' ...


127

Normally, I try to focus on what's fair, appropriate, etc. to everyone, but this question is really about legal questions, so I'll try to focus on that. Even though I'm not a lawyer, so you should get your own if you really need legal advice. :) The short version: Legally speaking, the CC-SA license does not give contributors any veto power over our name, ...


70

Since you are presumably the owner of that content, there is no need to mention SO, or that you also posted it there. Such a citation would only be necessary for someone other than the owner. If you weren't the owner of the content you provided to SO in the first place then you shouldn't have posted it to SO to begin with. SO requires that user ...


63

Can one do that? They can, but they can't take away any rights that Stack Overflow's CC-Wiki license agreement gives. The copyright of the content always remains with the author and they can re-license anything they publish on Stack Overflow any way they choose in parallel to SO. I once made an infographic illustrating the situation: I'm not a lawyer, ...


59

Go nuts. Technically, we own them, but you're free to use them as you see fit. Obligatory hat tip: (Yeah, I did that.) They were brought to life by talented illustrator Elias Stein, who we'd recommend wholeheartedly should you find yourself with any freelance illustration needs.


55

Yes, one can do that. They are giving you an additional license, so you can pick whatever license fits your needs. Since they are the original author of the content, they have the right to offer that content to you under any license they see fit. The author is effectively giving you a multiple licenses to choose from. Note that any re-use and reworking of ...


54

There's a lot of confusion here, and it's causing far more problems than are necessary. Disclaimer: I'm not a lawyer. Don't interpret this as legal advice. If you are the sole author of something, you can license it however you want. You can have one license, or two licenses, or multiple licenses - the folks using it can then choose whichever license they ...


53

You seem to have helpfully pointed out, through bold text, why your argument isn't even internally consistent: You may not implicitly or explicitly assert or imply any connection with, sponsorship or endorsement by the Original Author, Licensor and/or Attribution Parties, as appropriate, of You or Your use of the Work, without the separate, express prior ...


50

I declined that flag which read: This question infringes the original code's license : The original code is: mathworks.com/matlabcentral/fileexchange/… Its license is BSD : mathworks.com/matlabcentral/fileexchange/…"), for the reason stated. We regularly get people flagging various posts for perceived license violations (GPL, BSD, etc.), and we almost ...


49

Early on, I decided that posting my answers in a less restrictive fashion was better. Therefore, my profile includes: All original source snippets I post on Stackoverflow.com, and other sites in the StackExchange network, are dedicated to the public domain. If you do find value in my answers, I would very much appreciate an attribution and acknowledgement ...


40

IANAL but... The way I understand the terms of service, Stack Exchange does not claim exclusive ownership of content you submit. They do not require copyright assignment. They do require you to make it available under a CC BY-SA license, which allows them to make it available in turn under that same license. But there is nothing about the terms of ...


36

In short: No, you cannot post GPL code here. The FSF considers the CC-BY-SA to be incompatible with the GPL (the dashed yellow line along the left of the page indicates this, as shown in the key at the top of the page). While this is not the same as an actual court case establishing the fact, it's the next best thing. Stack Exchange's terms of service ...


32

I've been wondering about the same thing, so after reading your question I did some searching. From an answer by Jeff Atwood (by way of a comment by kajmagnus to this answer): The cc-wiki license seems pretty clear to me on this point: free to remix and reuse, as long as you attribute and use a similar license. That said, a snippet of code falls ...


32

When filing a bug, including a sample to reproduce it is great. If that sample comes from a Stack Overflow then you need to follow the license used by Stack Overflow. Simply link back to the post, and state who wrote the code, that's all it takes. It is rare for such code to actually end up in a test suite; usually OSS developers come up with a much more ...


32

No. Google is not meeting the requirements of the license, which requires: Visually indicate that the content is from Stack Overflow or the Stack Exchange network in some way. It doesn't have to be obnoxious; a discreet text blurb is fine. Hyperlink directly to the original question on the source site (e.g., https://stackoverflow.com/questions/12345) Show ...


26

If you rewrite the code using ideas a question/answer gave you, then it's your work, and you can do whatever you want with it. Update for answers written on/after March 1st, 2016 (Preliminary, work in progress): Content on StackExchange that is written on/after March 1st, 2016 is now under an MIT license with an additional right for you: You don’t have ...


25

The links at the bottom of all of the pages have always pointed to this text: Stack Exchange, Inc. does not discriminate in employment matters on the basis of race, color, religion, gender, national origin, age, military service eligibility, veteran status, sexual orientation, marital status, disability, or any other protected class. We support ...


23

Is he allowed to do so, because it is his own content? No. Everyone agrees to the CC:Wiki license that when they post content. It licenses contributions to the community and that license can't be revoked. The user does have the option of requesting their name be removed from the post through disassociation. To request disassociation, use the "contact ...


22

I'm not a lawyer but my guess is that the license of the content at SO is irrelevant here since you do not publish the content of SO itself but only a work created by the content. The work itself (the figure) is in my opinion not subject to the license - it's fully yours. I think that everything you can achieve with the content published here is not affected ...


22

I saw none of the answers referenced the relevant legal texts yet, so I decided to write my own. Yes. Firstly, you would be allowed to copy the answers to your blog even if they weren't yours. As the Terms of Service state: In the event that You post or otherwise use Subscriber Content outside of the Network or Services, with the exception of content ...


21

IANAL but... Most of the code on SE sites is so limited and resides in such massively independent snippets isolated from their originating problems that they can hardly be considered unique works of their own. For example, if you asked how to check for some value in a file in PowerShell, take advantage of function pattern matching in Erlang, avoid NULLs in ...


20

Your question about licensing is still not a practical programming problem. You also had a practical programming problem, but in trying to solve that a separate question arose, namely about the license of a solution you chose. That the license may prevent you from using that solution to your practical problem is neither here nor there. You can ask that ...


18

The best way to resolve this issue is to email team@stackexchange.com with the following request: Dear Sir or Madam, I link to my user page in many ways, directing others to it for personal and professional reasons. The recent logo change supporting a political or social cause on my user page unfortunately has the side effect of making my audience ...


18

Meh, I work at a HQ of a large multinational company that is in EU. It has been a topic here. The thing is: these politicians are not aware about the technological feasibility of enforcing these new copy right laws. They are not IT'ers like we are. They think that you can say to a computer that "this image shall not be uploaded because it exists (partially) ...


17

I received a response from Stack Exchange. Spencer, Sorry we haven't been able to give you more help. More sorry that I still can't add much helpful info. Giving a response that I know is not solving someone's need is about as unsatisfying as this job gets. I checked back with the folks who liaise with legal, and confirmed that for the time ...


16

Since my comment on another question generated this question, I'll answer. First some preliminaries: I am a computational physicist, not a lawyer, so any opinions expressed on legal issues are those of a layperson. I will not discuss my personal opinion on the SCOTUS decision as I see it as largely irrelevant to the question at hand. It should go without ...


16

IANAL, but Google appear to be in the clear. The key point is, CC attribution clauses can be met by reasonable means according to the medium. It does not require blind adherence to the requests of the licensor. SE can say whatever it wants in its attribution requirements, but that doesn't mean every point must be met or that every point is reasonable for ...


16

It’s your answer, and you are the only author? You may post it. No attribution required. It’s your answer, and other users edited it? If the edits were minor, you may post it without attribution. But if the edits were substantial, you may only post it if you attribute it according to (and license it under) CC BY-SA 3.0. It’s someone else’s answer? You may ...


14

Glad this came back up. Even the CC says not to use CC for software: We recommend against using Creative Commons licenses for software. Instead, we strongly encourage you to use one of the very good software licenses which are already available. We recommend considering licenses made available by the Free Software Foundation or listed as “open ...


13

I think Servy's analysis here is excellent with regards to content ownership and licensing. One aspect to consider though, is that including a link to Stack Overflow only serves to give you more visibility. In my opinion that would be beneficial as well. I suppose if you didn't want the company to know you had a Stack Overflow account that would be ...


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