84

Version-specific tags are a bit complicated. They are a necessary evil, but they're often used inappropriately. The secret is that you should only use a version-specific tag when the question is specifically related to that version. This is just a special case of the general rule that tags describe the question itself. Consider another example. You are ...


35

First of all: Python 2 questions are not going to be obsolete. Only Python 2 support from the Python core team is. You’d want to focus on informing people about that fact, instead. You can do so, within reason; I only do so when it is clear the user is new to the language and I suspect they are learning on their own. At that point that person would actually ...


24

Braiam is right: the solution here is to tag all questions with the c++ tag, and then you'll automatically get syntax highlighting appropriate for the C++ tag. This is just another special case of the more general rule that, when you use a version-specific tag, you should also always tag with the "main" tag. For example, when you tag with c++11, you also ...


23

As rene mentioned in a comment, the consensus is that ideally we use python for anything python-related, and when the question itself has to do with specific differences between 2 and 3 we add python-3.x or python-2.7. The tag wikis support this distinction, but of course we know how well people read that sort of thing. There are no special machineries in ...


23

If the question doesn't have anything to do with ES6, then it doesn't need an ES6 tag. If the OP is using code that wouldn't exist without the ES6 specification, I don't see the harm in including the tag, but it's not required unless the problem has specifically to do with ES6 features. Don't remove ES6 tags from questions that contain ES6 code.


19

Generally speaking, version-specific tags should only exist when: There are major backwards-incompatible differences between versions, and Both versions of the software continue to be used by the developer community. In essence, there should be questions regularly asked about both versions, with significantly different answers depending on which version. ...


13

If there's a new version of a framework/API/SDK then there's nothing stopping you adding a new answer using that version. That's what makes Stack Overflow useful - there can be multiple answers offering different ways of solving a problem. You just pick the one that's right for you. One word of warning though. It may be that the question is about a ...


12

It was approved by the author of the post who has a binding vote. If you look at the review it shows only one person on it and that happens to be the author of the post. https://stackoverflow.com/review/suggested-edits/22147323


11

If you're proposing to localise the UI and/or user contributed content by way of machine translation, then you have way too much faith in machine translation. It simply doesn't work all that well, certainly not well enough to build a community on. There would be only two approaches here: Everyone tags their posts with what language it's written in, and a "...


9

No. What if you're stuck using an older version of a library / language? The required answer may be specific to that version. As quoted from that linked answer: Generally speaking, version-specific tags should only exist when: There are major backwards-incompatible differences between versions, and Both versions of the software continue to be used by the ...


9

Whatever the answer to your question may be, working your way through the Stack Overflow archive removing tags from questions isn't a responsible or useful thing to do. I would agree that, if a question is tagged only with a specific version of a language then it also should carry the general version tag, but the additional more specific tag is certainly ...


8

This question actually brings up a more general issue with SO. The best way of doing things can change over time. Often you will have an answer with hundreds of votes -- but the answer and the votes are both several years old. People don't realize that a lower-ranked answer, with fewer, but more recent, votes, is actually a better way of doing things. For ...


7

I think this feature would be very useful for JavaScript answers. When people ask JavaScript questions they seldom explicitly specify which version they're using. See my meta question: Are answers using latest, not widely supported ECMAScript features discouraged? The consensus is that if someone writes an answer using latest ES features, they should ...


6

I hate to metaphorically answer a question with a question, but... What use would we get out of these tags that adding a more up-to-date answer wouldn't provide? To describe the scenario, we have a lot of answers from older versions of languages who have had their approaches revised, may be deprecated, or have had methods explicitly removed. What worked ...


6

Currently, the documentation for HTML includes 6 versions: 1.0, 2.0, 3.2, 4.0, 4.01, and 5. That's irrelevant. HTML is supposed to be backwards compatible all the way back to version 1.0. WHATWG prefers you designate it as HTML (not HTML5). There's very little reason to distinguish HTML versions as all browsers are supposed to handle invalid/outdated ...


6

No. These language-specific names are in English whereas the two letter language acronym is largely universal. If this were to happen, there would also need to be a redirect for espanol.stackoverflow.com and other localized languages. It adds little value to foreign speakers to have an English named redirect.


5

In general, try to use code which is supported through all versions still getting normal updates. [normal == not only security fixes] Put this one first in any case. It's weird to first see something what won't work for me and then I'll have to scroll down to see if anything working is there. Where it is impossible to express code in the same way for ...


4

Upvote both answers. Both the old answer and the new answer are useful, as long as they specify which versions of Python they apply to. You can clarify the old answer's applicability by leaving a comment on it: "Works in Python 2 and Python 3."


3

People use language version tags for various purposes. Often they use the latest version tag to mean: I need modern language features. (I think that's the most common case.) But a specific language version tag can also be used to mean: "that version and exactly that version". We can't dismiss that occurrence (even if it might be a rare case) and we can't ...


2

As a workaround, you can nest multiple version blocks: <!-- if version <Python 2.x> [gte 2.3] --> <!-- if version <Python 3.x> [gte 3.0] --> content <!-- end version if --> <!-- end version if -->


2

While I can't comment on other languages, this is Java. We all know that Java isn't going to be removing features; they like to ensure backwards compatibility. I would just use the java tag, unless you are talking about an older version, or the differences between two versions. I get annoyed with java questions that are tagged java-8 because I only follow ...


2

Tags are keywords or labels that categorize and group your question with other, similar questions. Having only one tag would crowd one tag too much, and people interested in just a newer version of language would have to come across all those useless (for them) questions. Different version of languages have many changes, and sometimes different enough that ...


2

I am not sure in which context you had asked keeping the question up to date by adding a new tag python 3.x or something. If I'm in the right direction then I will not add a new tag as the original post was asking solution in the context of python 2.x As you have said got a great answer, with my requested functionality nicely wrapped in a function. The ...


1

The tag usage is supposedly: use c++ always, then add specific standard tags if needed. People watch the main C++ tag but not necessarily the rest of them. So by just using c++11, the C++11 experts might not even read your post. I would think this to be more important to the person asking the question than code formatting.


1

If you encounter an old question that, in retrospect, is clearly specific to an older version, you should add a version-specific tag to that question. I think adding a sentence in the question referring to the version also would help future visitors.


1

For a topic You can select the versions it applies to: when editing a topic, there’s a Versions field under the Title field. However, if you want to specify that the topic applies to all versions, you should deselect them all. That way, if a new version comes along, the topic doesn't hint that it no longer applies to that version. The available versions ...


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