144

Wait what, they don't? I have signed up on some Stack Exchange sites that I just read in the past just to vote on some stuff, thinking that maybe in the future when I got around to getting some rep my votes would have counted. Now you are telling me they don't? Then the wording must change. Because right now, the wording suggest that you are actually ...


64

So, while I understand many question-askers may be foreign with English not being their first language, there is no excuse for the massive amounts of these questions on the site. ...You do realize that English is only spoken by about 760 million of the world's total population, right? Also, there's something on the order of 3 billion online users across ...


62

I agree that the wording could be improved, but I think we can do better than your initial suggestion. How's this: #1 Achieve a score of 5 answering a question that's at least 60 days old. I think most readers would find that to be clear and unambiguous. Here's a variation intended to address 8bittree's point, if it's really an issue: #2 Answer ...


50

I had been lurking for years prior to creating this recent account, and so some messages remain new to me. When I downvote currently, forgetting I don't have that privilege yet, I am always confused by the displayed text. And it isn't because of a English vocabulary or grammar deficiency on my part. I second the need for a change. I recognize the need for ...


41

Is it OK to ask moderation (with flag) help with improving English gramma in own posts? No, moderator flags should only be used for things that regular users cannot handle. You do have a couple options though. If you can find a chat room willing to help you out then you can post a gist with the content and they can help you out editing it until it is ...


32

This is known as a "dangling participle". That is, the participle isn't modifying the subject of the sentence. It is considered an error by many style guides. I found this in a quick google search: In the sentence below, the modifying clause (Rushing to catch the bus) contains a participle (rushing). The participle is said to be dangling because the ...


22

Based on the discussion on CWilson's answer, the wording has been updated to the more accurate (albeit more passive), "Thanks for the feedback! Votes cast by those with less than #repRequired# reputation are recorded, but do not change the publicly displayed post score." This should be visible after the next build. Please remember that votes from anyone ...


22

No, it's not appropriate to flag your posts for moderator attention because of their grammatical errors. Community members may choose to edit the post, if they want to. Moderators are there to handle issues that cannot be resolved by the community, and a few grammatical errors doesn't qualify.


19

It's a global site, and we work hard at being inclusive. I know if I were trying to write questions on a site other than English, I'd be floundering, even with translation tools. This is where we need the community to participate with useful edits. Rather than making trivial edits on old posts, bumping them to the home page, focus up on obvious edits on new ...


19

Yes, technically. Or perhaps more accurately: yes, according to the classic rules of English grammar. However, "they" is commonly used in modern English as a workaround for the language's lack of a true gender-neutral singular pronoun. Proposed alternatives like "e" (Spivak pronouns) have never really caught on, "it" is dehumanizing when used to refer to ...


17

The regex StackOver[fF]low can detect such errors with no false positives. Except for when your language of choice uses Pascal case and actually has a StackOverflow exception or error. I don't see why this should be automated. Simply comment or edit it.


15

That's a Serial comma, also known as the Oxford comma. It is used to ensure that the part after & is seen as a separate item in the series. Without the comma, you can interpret the sentence in two different ways: Where Developers Learn Share Build Careers or Where Developers Learn Share Careers Build Careers ...


11

There's a few parts to this description and if we're going to reword it to eliminate the ambiguity of one part, we should be wary of introducing new ambiguity to other parts. I would propose this: Answer a question more than 60 days later and score 5 or more on that answer. It says: What to do (answer a question) When to do it (60 days later) What ...


10

Commas Use the oxford comma in sentences. Don’t use a comma to separate two distinct phrases (comma splicing). Use two sentences instead. source: https://stackoverflow.design/content/guidelines/grammar-and-mechanics#commas


10

Simple! Thanks for the feedback! Your votes cast after gaining a total of 125 reputation will change the publicly displayed post score. If at all a change that small is needed. Most of the suggestions on this page make heavy use of you. We don't really have to stress it that much. When one has to tell users about a privilege that they lack it is ...


9

Looking at my own questions (I post far more answers than questions) most of them use a title that is not syntactically in the form of a question. Example: "Waiting for a hierarchy of tasks to complete". When you click on "Ask a Question" you get a form in which the first box is labelled "Title". There may be something deep in Stack Overflow documentation ...


8

After reading the comments I completely disagree with my own proposal. I leave it just in case someone else comes with the same idea.


8

The superfluous hyphens have been excised. Feel free to upvote this answer (or downvote, if you must).


7

Different placements convey different meanings, as is the case in these three sentences: Only John likes Mary. John only likes Mary. John likes only Mary. Yes, but that's a different set of sentences. "It only takes a minute" is idiomatic and there is practically zero ambiguity as to what it means. No one thinks that joining the site does nothing but ...


7

Nope. The When asking part refers to the actor, which is you, in this case. When <verb>, then <advice> is a common sentence construction to give advice in general to anyone doing <verb>, and properly refers to the actor. substantially edited because I first misunderstood the question


3

Consensus seems to be that it’s fine for SO to be using this informal colloquialism. Works for me!


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