New answers tagged

4

While a FGITW cowboy might post like that, there's another, similar concept to keep in mind - FDITW (fastest downvote in the west). They might eventually end up with a good quality answer but in the meantime, it's an incoherent blob of garbage. People reading the answer will give it the downvote it deserves. It's very rare for someone to go back and re-...


3

My approach is simple. If an answer is bad (code would throw an obvious error or logic does not result in outcome desired by OP) then I downvote; no constructive comment, they don't deserve one. If I'm sticking around and writing an answer then I'll check if the answer was edited into something coherent and remove my downvote before I move on to other things....


17

To avoid the FGITW issue, I try to do the exact opposite: instead of rushing to answer new questions, I check old questions that have no answers. Of course, you'll find questions of dubious quality, but every once in a while, you'll find very interesting and difficult questions that are very rewarding to answer. Those questions can also lead to a great ...


24

My general advice after some 10+ years is to not pay attention to when other answers are posted or how bad/good they are. Or how much rep the person who posted it got, for that matter. Forget about FGITW. If you spend time on your answer it will get rewarded in the long run (if you care about reputation). The user base here may be a snarky bunch (yours ...


24

Let me tell you a very common experience which I've had in the python tag. This relates to your question. For starters, the python tag is huge. It has a lot of modules, meaning you'd only be able to answer questions on a few of these modules. Each of these tags have somewhat less traffic than the main tag. Anyways, a question is asked. It's a borderline ...


59

I agree with you, and in all of my years of contributing to Stack Overflow, I have always followed essentially the same approach that you describe. (Well, generally, I don't test my code. I prefer to just write it in the Markdown editor directly. But I do review it thoroughly to make sure that it is correct and thoroughly explained before hitting the "...


24

There's a lot to take in here, but the ultimate question that I think you're teasing out is: "What does Stack Overflow do about answers which are incomplete, unviable or otherwise inappropriate?" To which the answer, from a technical perspective is nothing, because the system itself has no way of knowing any of those things. The users - yes, that'd ...


10

You can ask the answerer to edit their answer to rearrange it, and explain why—the additional information you didn't need could be useful to other users. Or you could do the rearrangement and put an explanation in the edit comment box, and perhaps the answerer will accept that edit quickly or make an improvement to it.


38

There's nothing wrong with adding your own answer, so long as it doesn't duplicate existing answers. If another answer basically has the solution, but has a lot of additional fluff, or is presented in a confusing manner, you're actually providing value if you add an answer that's simpler, or clearer. Don't focus on the fact that the other answer is confusing ...


-19

Edit the answer to be sufficiently clear and useful. While you edit, keep in mind: Make a sufficient change (which in this case you probably will) Fix all of the problems in the post Don't change the answer so much that it distracts from the original intent of the post If you satisfy all of these criteria, suggest your edit, and it will probably be ...


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