New answers tagged

20

Don't change working code on accepted or notably upvoted answers. This particular answer was written 7 years ago, and (while certainly not perfect) has stood the test of time. If you have comments about edge cases, or want to post an alternative or related answer, please do. Changing the narrative flow of an answer, introducing stylistic changes to working ...


14

When reviewing an edit, make sure to look at the Markdown view for the post, because only looking at the rendered output can sometimes make it hard to see what's actually happening even with a side-by-side comparison. In this case, they added backticks to the code terms in your answer, which is an edit that I would approve. The side-by-side comparison also ...


11

There are no advantages in making suggested edits "revocable". No advantage for the one making the suggestion: there is simply no way to know the next suggestion is going to have a speedier reviewing. No advantage to the system: If one could cancel their suggestions, other users could be wasting their time reviewing edits that one could take back ...


8

You kinda nailed the root problem here midway through your post: And in a vast majority of these cases they don't even know how this works. Save for an embarrassingly small group of exceptions, nobody knows how this works. Not really. I mean, it's really terribly complicated... At the start of all of this, it was pretty easy to explain. One might say ...


7

Well, that is somewhat unfortunate behavior (again) of the is this post code check. Here is the analysis of what goes belly up in that post: It does allow [1]: https://vimhelp.org/motion.txt.html#paragraph [2]: https://vimhelp.org/motion.txt.html#object-select [3]: https://vimhelp.org/change.txt.html#CTRL-A but it doesn't allow [a]: https://vimhelp.org/...


4

I agree with the basis of the question: queuing questions for reopening after an edit creates problems. My own issue of concern is about what to do with suggested edits, made by low-rep users and entered in the "Suggested Edits" queue, for changes that improve the communication of a post but do not improve its technical merit: edits for ...


-11

Your suggestion to give users the power to flag for reopening is fatally flawed because we cannot rely on them to be honest enough to use that power responsibly. As the author of a question, your number one priority is getting that question answered, so of course you're always going to click the "reopen plz" button. And since users don't read, for ...


3

To rehash a previous answer of mine: Why not fix the ways posts get into the reopen queue, by e.g. not allowing edits by others than the OP into pushing it there? If only cosmetic edits could've made a post on-topic, it shouldn't have been closed to begin with. It's not like the reopen queue is ever overflowing. Another thought on this would be to let every ...


0

I agree with the suggestion, but I think it can be easily simplified so beginners understand what the UI is talking about. Note that you can edit any question - you can also edit questions that are not closed. Also, you can edit for any reason - not only for reopening. So, make the UI do the following: If (OP editing own question) and (the question is closed)...


36

I like this idea, but with a small change. The purpose of sending questions to the reopen queue is to ensure those questions get a fair shake at being seen and answered a second time around. As you said, a lot of these edits are not worth sending because they are cosmetic edits (example, fixing typos, formatting code, editing tags) and therefore are not ...


18

In this case there is very little else that could have been fixed in that answer, except for trimming out the HTH at the end; and I personally believe that any improvement to a question or answer, no matter how "small" (e.g. correcting syntax highlighting), is valuable. The problem comes in when, as in this case, it's a user with under 2k ...


18

That's actually an interesting case. Generally speaking, such an edit can be useful. What your image doesn’t show is that the code block got the lang-shell in the edit. If, for some reason, you have a Java code inside a Python tagged post, such an edit might be an improvement and justified. Here, the changes are very minor. True, we run pip in a shell, but ...


13

They added the shell language hint to force the correct syntax highlighter. To achieve that they needed to switch the code block to a code fence. Your screenshot hides that, switching to the markdown view gives a better view to judge the change. I've tried viewing the code as is, with lang-default, lang-shell and shell and the changes are noticeable but I ...


12

Why would you revert that? If it was a positive edit that improved the post then what is the point in reverting it? The goal is to have clear on-topic questions that can be answered, and clear correct answers. If an edit is substantial to either question or answer but makes it better while keeping the original intent of the author then there is no reason to ...


5

This was fixed in October of last year. Basically, this happened because there was only one client-side check to see if there was a pending suggested edit, which occurred when the page was loaded. Thus, if you loaded the page before someone suggested an edit, and then proceeded to edit the post yourself, it would just direct you to the post editor since ...


-3

Extending the other answers, it depends also on the OP. The OPs typically don't know that their post is editable by others, don't come back or don't react comments. The post that they've written is common knowledge (CC-BY-SA or so). The site has its rules, where and how can it be changed. One of the rules is that editing against the intent of the OP is ...


2

One still can leave an explicit edit reason, when there is information to add for the owner... and in case they shouldn't agree, they can deny or roll back the edit with a click. This argument about the content could be considered similar to some Chutzpah - therefore the edit reason should be a good argument. And even if the edit might by partially wrongful, ...


16

TL;DR: I sometimes edit already at 95% certainty. I do not edit anything if I am not sure about it. But in contrast to the 100% certainty mentioned in other answers here (which I basically agree with), I do, in situations which I will explain below, already edit at around 95%. This is when I have asked clarification questions in comments have gotten ...


22

If you look at it and think: ... not sure that I understood the original poster (OP) correctly. then you shouldn't make any edit. Move on and leave it to other users. In my opinion this also applies when a user hasn't got edit-privilege yet. Only edit a question (or answer) when you are confident that your edit is an improvement and preserve the author's ...


37

When you have full editing privileges, there's no way for you to submit an edit for review. As with all privileges earned on this site, using them is not optional: if you've earned them, they'll always be used. When you're uncertain whether an edit is appropriate, you have two options: Don't make the edit at all. Instead, leave a comment underneath the post ...


5

Make the edit and follow the post. If the OP rolls your edit back, then you'll get notified and you can ping them asking exactly why they rolled back your edit. If the OP is rolling back your edit out of vengeance (meaning they don't want their post to be edited) then simply move on. It is their loss if they don't want a high quality post. If you don't ...


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