New answers tagged

6

TLDR: YES. Learning programming is hard. It's hard whether you're being taught by yourself or someone else. It's different than some other subjects, because often you don't simply have to learn how something works, and you have to learn an entirely new way of thinking before you can do that. It's time consuming, because it takes practice to wrap your mind ...


8

Perhaps some will care about my opinion: I have been teaching at the computer science education at the university in my city for a variety of courses: Software development, introduction to programming, template math libraries with C++, computer systems (architecture, C, networking, and OS), and computer graphics. When you teach, you get a lot of questions ...


2

I think that SO is a good place for self-learners, but it is highly recommended to take a course about the language/framework before asking if the time allows it. This offers several advantages: a more profound understanding of that framework's way of thinking the why behind many aspects that the framework solves you know how various concepts are named and ...


8

Stack Overflow is great in self-learning only if you have learned your basics somewhere else, got good grips on what you're doing, and then have specific question about some problem you encounter along the way. Starting from scratch in Stack Overflow does not quite work for me because of how generalized each answer is trying to be (they describe things well, ...


3

I asked a question and not five minutes after posting, it got marked as duplicate and closed... Some time ago I asked a question, which was closed as a duplicate almost immediately. And I was very happy indeed. Why? Because I got the answer I needed in less than a minute. Being closed as a duplicate means you have your answer (sometimes several), right away....


26

Yes, Stack Overflow is an excellent resource for self-learners. I know because I’m one. I learned to program in various languages way before Stack Overflow existed, but more recently I got reacquaintanted with C++, which is totally different now than it was 20 years ago; I am learning more advanced Python; I learned SQL; I learned Git; etc. All these things ...


20

Important caveat upfront: Most people who get question-banned are not like you. You (as evidenced by the very fact that this meta-question exists and isn't just a rant about what unfair jerks we are) are not the primary target of that autoban. You are the 1 in 10,000 and while it may sting personally remember there's a long tail of unobserved people for whom ...


-10

Stack Overflow is a tool which is used by the community. The tool is not responsible for its usage. The usage of tool and its effectiveness purely depends on user (their raising, education, health, etc.). So, I'd second the answer of @Makoto. Although, of course, almost every tool accepts improvements and that's why the development exists. That said, if you ...


2

As someone who, along many many others, grew up with Stack Overflow to get help for hobby projects and now has a job as a developer: YES. Despite all the bad stuff the company has done, Stack Overflow is still an invaluable resource base. The information found on this site is literally worth billions of dollars if you value in the time and the effort ...


55

From Makoto's answer: That is because this invites conversation, and conversation is not Q&A Every sentence in that answer is chock-full of excellent advice. But this is the key, and I'd like to elaborate… In particular, the conversation being invited is hand-holding, personalized tutorial and education. Which is also not Q&A. Stack Overflow isn't ...


7

It's a great place for self-learners if you have enough grit. Tough skin, persistence, etc. The burning desire to figure something out. The hope to connect with someone on it, even though you know you will be on your own. For common popular things, such as jQuery - There will be the brutal secretary types who will immediately delete your post because you ...


117

Stack Overflow, in my experience, doesn't really care what kind of learner you are. Stack Overflow cares only about: Did you ask a concise, reasonable question? Did you include as much relevant detail as you could at the time? Did you look around for duplicates? Did you look online/anywhere else for similar approaches before asking a question? Q&A in ...


-5

Should I keep reposting my question until I receive the answer I want? No. Once might go unnoticed. Reposting the same question over and over to users who don't want to answer is not in your best interests. What should I do to the previous question? Delete it? Depends. How much reputation do you currently have? How many questions have you asked so far? ...


16

Should I really ask the same question again if the old one was closed as a duplicate? No. But unfortunately, the current wording (maybe by accident - don't know why they even thought about to choosing that) implies doing exactly that would be appropriate. "If this question doesn’t resolve your question, ask a new one." It suggests that if a ...


7

The banner says "ask a new one", not "ask the old one again". The new question needs to be more clearly different from the "similar" question. As EJoshuaS says, it might help to point out exactly how your new question is different from the "similar" question.


11

Strictly speaking, the duplicate banner says that it's been associated with a similar question (not the exact same one). If it really is the exact same (or a nearly identical) question, it should not be posted. If someone is dissatisfied with the answers they got, they can always add a bounty to the existing question (or edit it to improve it to improve its ...


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