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When this question was first posted, it was almost immediately upvoted, which shocked me because a question requires at least a ?. I posted a comment asking why someone would upvote it because there was no question.

Note: all of my comments on the "question" and one of the answers have been deleted.

Here is a synopsis of what subsequently transpired:

The OP also self-answered their post with a code-only answer that was almost immediately upvoted as well. I posted a comment on that answer stating that code-only answers are generally considered to be poor quality.

Later, the OP leaves a comment on the "code-only" answer asking if I meant to leave that comment on a different post because it wasn't a code-only answer. What the OP had failed to mention is that they had edited their answer (Revision 2) and changed it from a code-only answer (Revision 1). The OP hadn't added any context / non-code words until about a day after I left that comment. The OP then goes on to state that I'm encouraging people to downvote answers and that's toxic. I didn't encourage anyone to downvote. So, not only did they accuse me of an unwarranted comment about code-only, they then also said I was encouraging people to downvote. Both of these statements are completely false.

Then, another user interpreted that OP's comments on the previously code-only answer as proof that I'm being "derogatory". That user failed to consider that the OP had edited their answer and changed it from code-only and then made a comment making it seems like I was making an unwarranted comment about code-only. That user also took issue with the fact that I asked why someone would upvote the question, stating that is not helpful to direct comments at the upvoting action. I responded to that comment and said it was helpful in the sense that we should be helping to maintain the quality of the SO question repository.

Question

Why were my comments on the "question" removed, but the other user's comments that directly relate to my comments were left, with me still tagged?

It leaves a one-sided story, which is not an accurate accounting of what happened.

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    i mean... "why is this upvoted" is just as likely to be deleted as "why is this downvoted"... if not moreso. It's needless meta commentary that isn't there to improve the post. I'd assume responses weren't deleted because they weren't flagged as no longer needed.
    – Kevin B
    Commented Jul 9 at 19:20
  • Are you asking about this specific instance or the general case why sometimes only some comments of a conversation are removed?
    – cafce25
    Commented Jul 9 at 19:22
  • @KevinB TY. I didn't realize flagging as "no longer needed" was the action I should take. Commented Jul 9 at 19:24
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    @cafce25 - It's not specific to this case. The general question applies: why would only one side of a conversation be deleted and not also the comments that tag and make reference to the deleted comments? However, I see from KevinB's comment that the pathway to have the orphaned comments deleted is to flag them as "no longer needed" Commented Jul 9 at 19:29
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    It's been covered before on meta a few times, but IIRC it's because mod tools suck.
    – Kevin B
    Commented Jul 9 at 19:31
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    If someone flags a comment, the easiest thing is to read just that comment and make a decision. The ideal would be for the mod to read the entire thread, but workloads being what they are, sometimes expediency triumphs over the ideal. Commented Jul 9 at 19:37
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    A comment that asks why a question was upvoted just seems unwelcoming, if you found the question unhelpful, I would have just downvoted the question Commented Jul 10 at 0:31
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    I also find a comment asking about downvotes to be self destructive and not helpful. So I am not a fan of either type of comments, even though I have found myself, asking why perfectly valid questions of mine being downvoted. Questions which I took great care to describe, and self answer. Knowing my question has been seen by others without resolution. Commented Jul 10 at 0:40
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    You're misrepresenting the situation on the answer. The OP's comment explaining why it's not code-only said "This answer provides a usage example with sample output.", which was true of the first revision. They then added text besides that in an edit (as they stated in the comment). Also, while you did not quite advise people to downvote, what you said was still inappropriately telling people how to vote: "To whomever upvoted this answer: Code-only answers are considered to be of poor quality. Please don't upvote answers that are poor quality."
    – Ryan M Mod
    Commented Jul 10 at 0:45
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    "It leaves a one-sided story, which is not an accurate accounting of what happened." - for one... comments are not meant to tell a story. It is a cascaded result of comments being posted which should not have been posted to begin with, so "it's a mess". It is understandable to use comments like this because there is no dedicated site feature to request feedback that has nothing to do with the post itself. But the fact that this feature does not exist... is also a hint that maybe you're not supposed to. For the future: meta, not comments.
    – Gimby
    Commented Jul 10 at 10:26
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    code only or not "why is this upvoted" is never a useful comment. The criticism can be provided without it.
    – Kevin B
    Commented 2 days ago
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    The statement being made here is that this revision, while containing only a code-block, does not contain only code; it also contains the output of said code.
    – Ryan M Mod
    Commented 2 days ago
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    @RyanM I believe the disconnect here may be in what is considered "code only." I would also call that a code only answer as it contains no prose of any kind.
    – Booga Roo
    Commented 2 days ago
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    @BoogaRoo I agree that that is the disconnect. Whether it is code-only or not or is not is debatable; I've seen code-only answers that are far worse than that, due to having only code (often a lot of code, most of it irrelevant to the technique being used) without output. IMHO, it's still equally code-only now; there's still no explanation of the technique. But, at least, the OP's point was that they considered the original revision to not be code-only. A comment visible from Jun 21-25 said, in part, "it is not only code. It includes usage and sample output. I've also added text."
    – Ryan M Mod
    Commented 2 days ago
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    "I've also added text" refers to the edit. "it is not only code. It includes usage and sample output." refers to the original answer. I don't think you saw that comment, since on Jun 25 it was deleted and reposted in a different (and slightly less clear) version, which you replied to on Jun 25. And yes, I understand that you weren't trying to misrepresent it. I didn't mean to imply malicious intent; perhaps I should have said that the description (which didn't quote the comments but instead described them uncharitably) was misleading.
    – Ryan M Mod
    Commented 2 days ago

2 Answers 2

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which shocked me because a question requires at least a ?

We don't really have such a standard.

I personally don't think the question is very good, because it's written far too vaguely. For example, I can't understand from reading this whether the OP made a utility called Get-Date and wants to improve how it parses the command line; or whether the goal is to change how PowerShell passes arguments to programs; or just what exactly. Writing "something more like this" is also not well defined.

But there certainly is a question here. If someone writes I want to ... :, this effectively has the same meaning as How can I ... ?. We don't have such strict requirements for editorial style.

If you think there is nothing else wrong with a question but also feel that such a change would improve the question, please just edit it (or propose an edit, below 2k reputation). Don't point fingers for something that would be trivial to do yourself. That's inefficient on a technical level, and a nuisance on a social level.

I posted a comment asking why someone would upvote it because there was no question.

Please don't do this. Comments critiquing a question are for the OP's benefit, so that OP can improve the question, in the cases where others cannot (because it depends on information that only OP has).

I posted a comment on that answer stating that code-only answers are generally considered to be poor quality.

While you're correct, this pattern of commenting could come across as stalking or pursuing a vendetta.

Aside from that, if you think the "almost immediate" upvote is suspicious for some reason, then gather more information and handle it privately - by raising a custom flag on one of the user's posts, and explaining the situation. Voting fraud is taken seriously (because it diminishes the value of voting as a signal to post quality), but is definitely not something to deal with publicly.

The OP then goes on to state that I'm encouraging people to downvote answers and that's toxic. I didn't encourage anyone to downvote. So, not only did they accuse me of an unwarranted comment about code-only, they then also said I was encouraging people to downvote. Both of these statements are completely false.

It looks like all the comments have been removed now.

Comments generally don't get removed unless someone calls a moderator's attention to them. When an individual comment is flagged, there's no guarantee a moderator is going to look at the entire comment section.

It's better not to engage with this sort of commentary. If there isn't a clear violation of the Code of Conduct, please flag the comments as "No Longer Needed". (If they do violate CoC, then flag the violation appropriately.)

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    I read "I want to..." as a statement of a requirement. For example, "I want to clean this up". OK, that's your objective / requirement. That's not the same thing as "How do I do x". I definitely don't want to argue semantics. The point I was trying to make with my comment was that I was shocked that the question was upvoted, along with a self-answered code-only answer, when they were both poor quality. I had no intention of stalking or seeking a vendetta, which is in fact, why the orphaned (now deleted) comments my question here pertains to, were problematic. TY for the feedback Commented Jul 9 at 21:10
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    "When an individual comment is flagged, there's no guarantee a moderator is going to look at the entire comment section." This is correct, and it's because the UI for doing so from the mod dashboard is painfully bad. By default, you're shown only the flagged comments on the post. To see all of them, you need to click to expand the post, scroll down to the comments section, click to show comments (yes, all the comments are hidden, even with the post expanded, when handling comment flags), and then scroll down again to bring the comments into view. And we get a lot of comment flags.
    – Ryan M Mod
    Commented Jul 9 at 21:11
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    I'm with OP, at least in this case; there's no question in the post under discussion, only a statement of requirement. One can infer that OP is asking how to do that, but it's not (and shouldn't be) our job to guess what OP is asking; it's their responsibility to tell us what their question is. The English language even has an extremely handy way of conveying this by writing an interrogative statement and ending it with a ?.
    – TylerH
    Commented Jul 10 at 14:44
  • Furthermore, given the question has received multiple answers but has no comments or acceptance by OP over the last ~3 weeks (yet OP was last active as recently as this week), it's hard to conclude that the inference of their requirement being their actual question is correct. As such, I've cast a "needs details/clarity" close vote on the question.
    – TylerH
    Commented Jul 10 at 14:45
  • @TylerH in principle I would agree, but that creates a whole new category of cleanup for old questions (well, "question" posts). Commented Jul 10 at 17:26
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    @KarlKnechtel I dunno about 'creates'--that category has always been there, and discerning reviewers/curators have always acted appropriately when coming across them, I hope.
    – TylerH
    Commented Jul 10 at 19:35
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  • Comments constituting meta commentary are always subject to deletion.

    • Leaving part of a conversation behind is unfortunate, but seemingly an accidental byproduct of the moderating tools making it hard to see comments in context, as noted.

    • If you come across such fragments, simply flag them as "No longer needed".

  • All your comments on the linked post were meta commentary, and two of them were inappropriate:

    • To quote part of Ryan M's comment on this other answer here:

      Also, while you did not quite advise people to downvote, what you said was still inappropriately telling people how to vote: "To whomever upvoted this answer: Code-only answers are considered to be of poor quality. Please don't upvote answers that are poor quality."

    • The other inappropriate one was left on the question post (I kept a copy):

      "To whomever upvoted this: there isn't even a question in the post. How can that be considered a good question :D :D :D"

      • To me, this adds a derogatory quality to the inappropriate advice; while I no longer have my original response, here's what I said in (a since moderator-deleted) response to your objecting to my characterizing your comment as derogatory:

        If you don't like the word derogatory, let's frame it in terms of whether your comments are helpful: Instead of encouraging posters to fix their questions or answers with constructive feedback, you're focusing on the voting behavior of other users, while talking about the poster rather than to them, in what is - to me, yes, but if I were to guess, also to others - a condescending tone.

  • That there may or may not have been evasion in meta commentary on the part of the linked post's OP with respect to when an edit to one of their answers occurred and whether your code-only criticism was therefore justified is ultimately immaterial:

    • They did rectify the problem by adding a (terse) verbal explanation, and doing so made the comments exchange - including your criticism - obsolete.

The quality of the linked post's question and answers are really incidental to your question, but for the record:

  • Unquestionably, the original wording of the question post and the simultaneously posted self-answer were suboptimal - these problems have since been corrected.

  • In short: The linked post is a self-answered question aimed at sharing a useful simplification technique with others, and, to users familiar with PowerShell, i.e. the target audience, I suspect that both what the implied question was and what the value of the code-only self-answer was were obvious from the get-go; it is to be hoped that the subsequent edits made that clearer.

  • Sadly, it seems that the Meta effect has struck again, as suggested by the timing of the majority of the (to me unwarranted) down-votes on the linked question.

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    I’m glad you’re here. Because I’ve kinda struggled with why you are framing things in a way that is not based on the facts. I suspect you made a mistake and didn’t realize the OP had edited their answer to include some prose, and then tried to play it off like my “code-only” comment was unwarranted. Commented 2 days ago
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    I also admit, after reading comments on this Meta post, I didn’t realize 1) comments about votes are unnecessary and 2) I could’ve just flagged your comments as “no longer needed”. However, I would ask that you consider, for just a second, that I directed my comments specifically to the upvoter with the idea of the quality of the question repository in mind. And neither the “question” nor the answer, in the state they were in when I made those comments, met the quality standards that warranted an unvote, IMO. Because that’s what happened on my end of this deal. Commented 2 days ago

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