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This is regarding a couple of questions I've seen in Staging Ground. Most recently it was this question https://stackoverflow.com/staging-ground/78577526.

These questions have these qualities:

  • They are unable to be answered with the information provided.
  • They likely have an obvious answer, once the user knows what debugging information to provide and where to find it.
  • The asker is responsive and usefully responds to each suggestion.
  • The suggestions are not generic question triage like "Please include the exact error message, and do not post screenshots of code", but require domain-specific knowledge. They blur the line between improving the question and attempting to answer it.

I don't want to claim these are perfect questions ready to go on the site. They have problems and are unanswerable as written, and likely once proper debugging information is provided, they'll be a duplicate of another question. There's a lot of meta questions about this style of "debug my build" questions (1, 2, 3, 4). But I also think they're ill-served by the current Staging Ground model. It takes longer to improve this sort of question to an answerable state when it goes through Staging Ground.

The answer the asker actually needs to move forwards is "I've encountered this problem before. Here is a checklist of things to look at. Do any of them seem wrong? If so, fix it."

In the old model, here is how such a question might go:

  1. Post question
  2. Quickly get 3 comments from users who follow a tag, asking you to check 5 different things and include 4 pieces of useful debugging information, along with how to get that information.
  3. Simultaneously, get downvoted to -3 and have the question closed. (Feels bad, but oh well.)
  4. Do the debugging steps suggested; at least one of the debugging things requested likely contains useful information.
  5. Google the error and apply solution, or edit the question and ask for it to be reopened.

In the new model, here's how it goes:

  1. Submit question for review.
  2. Reviewer 1, not a subject matter expert, asks for (potentially irrelevant) debugging information.
  3. Include the requested information, request re-review and wait 1-24 hrs.
  4. Reviewer 2, not a subject matter expert, asks for debugging information or quibbles with the debugging information requested by reviewer 1.
  5. Include the requested information, remove the quibbled-with bits, request re-review and wait 1-24 hrs.
  6. Eventually, reviewer N happens to ask for debugging information that ends up being useful.
  7. Either fix the issue and move on, or include the requested information and get the question flagged as duplicate.

The new system takes longer and is more frustrating. I think it's especially frustrating that the reviewer of a re-evaluate request will likely not be the same person who requested that edit, so you have no idea if that debugging information was worth anything!

Is this an issue, and if so, what can be done to alleviate it?

Mildly related: Does Staging Ground lead to nit-picking and death by committee?

3 Answers 3

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The suggestions are not generic question triage like "Please include the exact error message, and do not post screenshots of code", but require domain-specific knowledge. They blur the line between improving the question and attempting to answer it.

If people want to put effort into that, I think this is fine. It's far better that this happens in SG than in comments, or worse "answers", on the main site.

The answer the asker actually needs to move forwards is "I've encountered this problem before. Here is a checklist of things to look at. Do any of them seem wrong? If so, fix it."

I agree.

The problem is, we don't offer answers like that here - because such answers, and the corresponding questions, don't make for something that can be helpful to others.

It takes longer to improve this sort of question to an answerable state when it goes through Staging Ground.

I don't particularly see why. It's the same feedback. If the OP isn't "Quickly get[ting] 3 comments from users who follow a tag", that's just because we've only just started using the SG. Yes, by design, the SG puts fewer eyes on a question. But it selects for the eyes of people willing to curate, rather than people trying to pick up a quick upvote and accept for +25 reputation.

It already happens all the time on the main site that people without subject matter expertise come along and ask for possibly irrelevant debugging information based on a vague intuition.

That said, there's a deeper underlying issue that people with a debugging issue get repeatedly asked for various bits of debugging information even though it's unlikely that the question will end up being useful to anyone beyond OP. That, too, is an existing problem.

Part of that is because OPs aren't being expected to apply the standard debugging effort that is nominally required of them. But unless we're prepared to force people to read the tour and do a quiz on it before they're allowed to answer, I'm not really sure how we can ensure that people have the right expectations in that regard.

It's also partly because reviewers fail to prioritize "needs more focus" over "needs debugging details" generally. Before an MRE can be produced, one needs to identify the one specific thing that the example will reproduce. And there's little point in trying to include complete debugging information about that example before it's truly minimal.

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I don't think that the staging ground should require (much) domain knowledge. Neither do the other review queues. I use the tags, but that mostly makes me faster in reviewing.

As I see it the staging ground is basically a check if a question would get closed with a bit more explanations in order to give the question creator the opportunity to fix this before voting takes place and to be able to get some extra helpful comments. Like if a question would be unclear, one could add a comment saying which parts exactly or if an MRE is required one could explicitly say what parts can be removed (some people may need that) or give any other comment indicating what would improve that question as a question. We could do all these things also outside of the staging ground.

The goal is to make it answerable, not to answer it, so one could limit comments strictly to this purpose. If the question is on a level where it can be answered, it should probably simply be approved.

In some circumstances, the staging ground could become a live debugger, like for example the question creator reports a debugging problem, is advised to produce a minimal example, reports back that the problem vanished, is advised again, finds the problem, goes home happily. That was always the problem with debugging questions, also outside of the staging ground. For debugging questions I think sometimes it would be better to answer them with tutorials how to debug instead of answering them directly. But here I would simply keep the comments focused on making the question answerable and if it is, approve it.

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  • Just because a question can be answered doesn't mean it should be. Often, the real goal of a comment exchange is to figure out whether the problem is caused by a typo or if there's an actual underlying misconception. Granted, there can be a valid question about a misconception even if the OP doesn't have that misconception; but then there is still the task of determining what the misconception actually is (or rather, would be). Commented Jun 6 at 7:17
  • @KarlKnechtel Agreed. But should this be part of the staging ground? Should we try to find the problem behind the problem before publishing the question or should we simply do some formal checks that do not require much domain knowledge, basically bring the question only to "no obvious flaws anymore" level. I thought that a clear, focused, debugging question with an MRE should not remain in the stage ground regardless of what the solution will be. Or should it? Commented Jun 6 at 9:02
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My view is that if a question is good enough to ask for domain-specific debugging details, it's potentially good enough to post; Staging Ground doesn't seem designed for domain-specific advice, and if a question is readable and near-answerable it should be visible to the broader site.

Failing that, it seems like when reviewers send back a question for needing more information, we should remember that that'll be the last word on the question for the near future, and include as much information (and how to get it) as could be pertinent. Community Wiki questions ("How do I debug a Python package import issue" or something) might be useful.

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