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Bearing in mind it is still a new feature, I have noticed some trends in Staging Ground.

Everyone seems to feel obligated to give advice. Of course they do... they've been steered by Stack Overflow to use the new feature and urged to participate by chiming in on the questions new users have written. But is this leading to fault-finding, where even issues that are really non-issues get picked at to death because the community is so intent of finding something to improve about new users' posts?

Everyone is an expert, right? Well, at least many of us fall into the trap of thinking we are at times. I am a little concerned that with so much commentary back-and-forth before a question can even be viewed publicly, many questions will not make it past Staging Ground and go on to be seen by the masses. This is probably okay for truly poorly written questions and duplicates. But what about questions that are original and deserve to be asked, but get stuck in the system due to not ticking all the qualification boxes?

Furthermore, as someone tasked with reviewing questions, I feel some pressure when approving. Sometimes I don't know if it's a good question or not because the topic is so outside of my areas of knowledge. What then? Should I back off and let someone else handle it? What if everyone backs off to let someone more "qualified" give approval? Then does it become harder to ask about lesser known topics here, preventing them from becoming more widely discussed and understood?

Will Staging Ground make submitting a question a daunting process? I can't help but think we may be looking so hard that we see problems even where they don't exist, while the bureaucratic process takes our attention away from normal Q&A interactions on the site, and potentially alienates or overwhelms new users.

The stated three main goals of Staging Ground are:

  • Improve the quality of questions asked by new users
  • Increase the percentage of successful questions asked by new users
  • Improve the engagement and knowledge transfer between new askers and reviewers

These all appear to be noble goals to strive toward, in principle. But one way to raise the percentage of success metric is to turn away those who are likely to "fail". I hope we're not doing that.

Community, what do you make of the impact Staging Ground is having now, and the impact it is likely to have long-term on Stack Overflow? Will death by committee kill many would-be new contributions? Has the question submission process become too complicated? Is this going to have a censorship effect in some cases?

The broader question of Staging Ground's impact encompasses these smaller questions to ponder (no, I don't expect you to answer all of them, but please consider them). Personally, I never wanted to be a gatekeeper between a contributor and their freedom of speech. But this appears to be the vision the Stack Exchange Network has for the future. If one wants to be heard, they will need an approval stamp from the herd.

I would like to know your thoughts.

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  • 7
    I mean... some examples would be nice. I'd argue far too many new posts went unfinished prior to SG, never to be improved such that they'd be a useful addition to the knowledgebase. Will the SG prevent some users from receiving quick answers? Yes, absolutely! but hopefully it'll also result in questions and answers that help far more than the few that end up not getting an answer because their contribution wasn't worth adding.
    – Kevin B
    Commented Jun 5 at 4:57
  • @KevinB A couple examples that come to mind include: 1. requesting screenshots for a question that can be mostly understood from text alone 2. requiring a working Snippet although the code was already available. I agree that it would be ideal to include these enhancements - but to block a question from publication until they are added seems heavy handed to me. And when you see that an OP hasn't replied since getting the feedback, we can only wonder if they will return to fulfill the demands being made and polish their question, or just move on.
    – Mentalist
    Commented Jun 5 at 5:06
  • 4
    If someone is requesting screenshots in the SG, a flag needs to be raised.
    – Kevin B
    Commented Jun 5 at 5:06
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    "requiring a working Snippet although the code was already available" reviewers can edit the post to make the code into a snippet. This doesn't need to be a requirement to OP.
    – VLAZ
    Commented Jun 5 at 5:07
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    @VLAZ hehe, no they can't, the new editor that SG uses doesn't support snippets.
    – Kevin B
    Commented Jun 5 at 5:08
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    @KevinB *facepalm*
    – VLAZ
    Commented Jun 5 at 5:08
  • I'll mention that so far I am seeing a mix of both genuinely poor questions (LMGTFY type stuff) and good questions that are hitting a snag for some technicality. So yes, there are some benefits we can already observe. But I also would understand a new user being put off by the approval process.
    – Mentalist
    Commented Jun 5 at 5:24
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    I'm also seeing questions approved and published about problems with their code that lack code and are still full of typos, so the opposite is also true
    – Kevin B
    Commented Jun 5 at 5:27
  • 1
    oh... and... it also appears to be a dupe several times over and might not even be a programming question at all...
    – Kevin B
    Commented Jun 5 at 5:35
  • @KevinB I can only guess that's due to some people lazily approving without giving proper consideration to the quality of the question. Human elements like that are hard to address. I wouldn't fault the system for it. Not everyone has the same capacity to evaluate question quality. And not everyone cares.
    – Mentalist
    Commented Jun 5 at 5:41
  • 4
    My point is that, yea, some people are going ot be too picky. some people will be too lenient. does that mean people are worst off with staging ground than without?
    – Kevin B
    Commented Jun 5 at 5:42
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    It doesn't belong in my answer, but I want to pick apart the "freedom of speech" bit separately. Now, I've gotten really tired of people lazily linking that one XKCD comic and making bogus arguments equating freedom of speech to the First Amendment of the US - not only disgustingly Americentric, but completely disregarding the value of this philosophical principle which extends far beyond the law of any country. But on the other hand, on that philosophical level, it is not "censorship" to be denied the ability to request help in a place that isn't designed to offer that help. Commented Jun 5 at 6:02
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    (con't.) Posting a question on Stack Overflow isn't a meaningful form of self-expression, and the site doesn't exist for the purpose of expressing opinion anyway. The entire point is to be as objective and rational as possible, and intentionally exclude topics which don't facilitate an objective analysis. More broadly: the mere promise of posting user-generated content does not morally obligate anyone to be a carrier of arbitrary text. You can't use a Stack Overflow question to post an off-topic political screed, any more than you could dump it on a new Wikipedia page. Commented Jun 5 at 6:03
  • 6
    Which is to say: the site upholds standards for quality and topicality. The danger of censorship is when it allows those with power to impose bias in what is published, and thereby shape opinion of the masses. This is clearly not even remotely the same thing. Commented Jun 5 at 6:06
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    You ask a lot of the right questions. It's always a good idea to back off if you do not have the expertise. Since questions automatically leave the SG after a period of time that is fine. People being overcritical might be an issue but with the limited amount of time and reviewers available I hope that it won't happen too often. Apart from that, it all depends on how the SG is structured. Extra advice is effort but might help. Now we all await how it works together, i.e. on whether there is enough improvement happening to warrant the extra effort. Commented Jun 5 at 7:03

3 Answers 3

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Will Staging Ground make submitting a question a daunting process?

Probably not more than it already "should" be. The point of Staging Ground is to have a place and time to workshop on the already existing quality standards of this platform before transitioning to the place and time for getting answers.


is this leading to fault finding, where even issues that are really non-issues get picked at to death because the community is so intent of finding something to improve about new users' posts?

I dunno. I haven't been looking at other peoples' reviews because I just focus on new items (also, Add Staging Ground activity to activity tab in user profile). I myself am pretty picky, but I'm pretty sure I'm picky about non-controversial stuff like having good titles and MREs... okay I'll admit I'm taking SG as an opportunity to push harder for better MREs where I think it's appropriate. I can agree that my pickiness is a hurdle to the asker, but I think it's in line with the goals of the platform and SG. We want a high-quality knowledgebase with long-term value.


Furthermore, as someone tasked with reviewing questions, I feel some pressure when approving. Sometimes I don't know if it's a good question or not because the topic is so outside of my areas of knowledge. What then? Should I back off and let someone else handle it? What if everyone backs off to let someone more "qualified" give approval?

The point of SG is not to reach "perfection". See https://stackoverflow.com/help/staging-ground-reviewer-guidelines, which states:

  1. If you know what a good question looks like, you can review anything

    You don’t have to be a subject matter expert on the question in order to review it. If it looks like it has the elements of a good question, trust your gut and go with it, even if you are not an expert on the subject being discussed.

  2. Perfect is the enemy of good [...]

  3. You don’t have to fix everything [...]


Community, what do you make of the impact Staging Ground is having now, and the impact it is likely to have long-term on Stack Overflow?

Remains to be seen. I'm skeptical, but I hope for good things.


Will death by committee kill many would-be new contributions?

Maybe? I want to people who care enough to bear with it. For those who can't/won't, this platform may not be the place for them.


Has the question submission process become too complicated?

Maybe. In an ideal world, people would read the hecking Help Center pages on how to ask a good question and try to apply the guidance there, and we wouldn't need SG or review queues. Sadly, reality, and lack of systematic automatic onboarding.


Is this going to have a censorship effect in some cases?

If the asker just keeps submitting edits persistently, and out-persists reviewers, even if there's review abuse, the asker should win out and the thing will auto-publish.


You ask a lot of questions in one post...

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tl;dr: If it does, this is a good thing. The rate of new questions has already been severely declining - for a variety of reasons - and this has been a great boon for the site. With luck, eventually the site will find a way to incentivize experts who used to spend time answering a flood of mediocre new questions, to improve existing questions instead. Then we can finally make some actual serious progress towards the Great Work of Stack Overflow.

But is this leading to fault finding, where even issues that are really non-issues get picked at to death

My suspicion is that the things you think "are really non-issues" really, actually are issues. It can be difficult for experienced users to accept, but we really do have high standards for questions, and this is for good (and very carefully and extensively considered) reason.

The template comments incorporated into the Staging Ground give a fairly decent list of reasons why "major changes" might be required for a question - typically, "minor changes" are ones that could be made by a direct edit from others (i.e.: they don't require information that only the OP has), and thus one should normally just do that. (Of course, it's possible to have a good sense that an edit is required, but not feel confident about making it.)

I am a little concerned that with so much commentary back-and-forth before a question can even be viewed publicly, many questions will not make it past Staging Ground and go on to be seen by the masses.

What I'm seeing so far suggests that there isn't really a lot of back-and-forth. The OP is, theoretically at least, only going to comment because something about a comment wasn't clear. If the advice is understood, hopefully, OP will respond by editing according to the advice.

But what about questions that are original and deserve to be asked, but get stuck in the system due to not ticking all the qualification boxes?

Just because a question deserves to be asked, doesn't mean that the person proposing that question will be capable of expressing it satisfactorily. We aren't supposed to sacrifice quality for quantity around here - there's no rush, and we've sacrificed far too much already.

If you have privileges to ask a question outside of the Staging Ground and you are confident that you understand How to Ask a question that meets the site's standards and will help build the site as a question that can potentially be useful to others (think: how easy is it to imagine someone else's question being closed as a duplicate of yours?), then feel free to do that. If you know how to answer it, too, that's even better.

Sometimes I don't know if it's a good question or not because the topic is so outside of my areas of knowledge. What then? Should I back off and let someone else handle it?

Generally, yes. Of course, everyone is qualified to check on more basic issues like "is this question written in English?" or "for a how-to question, is it clear in all cases what the output should be for a given input?" or "for a debugging question, is there a complete error shown as text, not an image?". (Even if you don't know what complete error messages are supposed to look like for a given language or environment, it shouldn't be difficult to distinguish a copied-and-pasted output from a paraphrase the user typed out from memory.) But if you don't know, you can and should skip it - just like you would for any question you considered curating "manually", or for anything that came up in a review queue.

Then does it become harder to ask about lesser known topics here - preventing them from becoming more widely discussed and understood?

No, because it's already as hard as it would get. Some tags just don't have a lot of domain-specific experts around. If anything: when experts filter the SG by tag, and find a question that meets the site standards, then they'll have all the reason in the world to start writing an answer right away.

Will Staging Ground make submitting a question a daunting process?

You can't make something into what it already is.

If anything, I anticipate significant improvements in the new user experience. Because:

  • People who are explicitly opting in to consider new questions are the ones who will get the first chance to give feedback; they won't have to compete with random passersby who are browsing the front page

  • New users get told and shown up front that the standards exist - so users will be less likely to have incorrect expectations about the site that then get violated

  • Template comments are readily available for everyone (they don't have to find out about and then install some browser extension), which are (at least in principle) reviewed and officially endorsed; this makes it easier to give feedback repeatedly without losing one's patience and possibly violating the code of conduct

But submitting a question is supposed to be difficult. Because the purpose of questions here is not to have a forum- or help-desk-like experience and fix one's specific issue in a specific bit of code - but to help build the site so that it can be a more useful reference for everyone.

These all appear to be noble goals to strive toward, in principle. But one way to raise the percentage of success metric is to turn away those who are likely to "fail". I hope we're not doing that.

Maybe it isn't the nicest thing to say, but I actually kinda hope we are.

Stack Overflow is about the questions, not about the people asking them. A brilliant question can come from a new user, and a complete waste of time can come from someone who has been around for 15+ years. When a question merits an answer, that answer should be calibrated to the expected knowledge of a generic person who might ask the question - not to the perceived knowledge of the person who actually asked. All of this is done, to reiterate, because the questions belong to everyone, not just the OP.

That said, in practice, bad questions dominantly seem to come from serial bad-question-askers. A lot of people are simply not interested in engaging with the site as intended and designed, and won't become interested no matter how much we try to explain that design and intent, and will happily run off and make a YouTube video (or just comment) about their negative experience. (This has a lot to do with why a question ban algorithm exists. I personally think this system is horribly implemented and due for a major overhaul; but it's better than nothing.)

And, well... we can change certain things about that experience, but we can't make Stack Overflow work like the kinds of discussion forum people keep expecting it to be, without losing the wonderful, incredibly valuable, unapologetically not a discussion forum thing that Stack Overflow actually is.

The Staging Ground represents one such attempt at positive change. It's quite possibly the first major feature the site has had in years that I actually thought was a net positive. And this is because it appears quite deliberately designed at forcing people to engage with the site as it actually is, rather than what they'd like to imagine.

Sometimes kids have to be made to eat their vegetables.

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There is a possibility, maybe even a guarantee, that some people will be too picky within the SG and hold back some posts longer than they should be.

However, with the way the SG is designed, I'd expect this to be a rather difficult task to do purposely without abusing the options available. Most of the options we have for tagging a question as needing major changes, or being off topic, being a dupe, etc all require the reviewer to indicate what needs to be fixed and anyone else using the SG can see these actions and take action on their own. This system is far more visible and reviewable/auditable than anything we've had before, directly in the built-in UI.

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