9

As the Staging Ground is right around the corner, I think we should make it clear how some things should be reviewed.

The reviewer guidelines state:

Give guidance, but don’t give the answer

However, sometimes the problem is solved while the question is still in the Staging Ground for example by the author discovering the issue on their own or after being asked for details by the reviewer. This issue happened in the beta and it seems there is no specific tooling made for this (Relevant post in the beta team for people with access)

What should reviewers do if the question is solved within the Staging Ground? (and it isn't a duplicate)

5
  • 7
    I suppose the question becomes "Is the question still a good question, and can it still be answered (by others) based on the content of said question?" If it can be then it should still be propagated to the site as an on-topic question. If the question can't be answered (by others) then it's shouldn't be pushed to the site; though you could mark it as needing "major changes" as if the OP improves it so that it can be answered, it can then be pushed the site. (I've not posted this as an answer, as I do wonder if we still see the "beta" version of the site, and tooling has changed).
    – Thom A
    Commented Jun 4 at 8:44
  • Yaakov Ellis did comment on the teams that they are considering a "I solved my problem button" button, like you proposed as well; so it might be that that is in the production tooling.
    – Thom A
    Commented Jun 4 at 8:50
  • @ThomA This is currently marked as [status-deferred] so I don't think it will be available now so IMO this needs to be discussed.
    – dan1st
    Commented Jun 4 at 8:51
  • 1
    I'll post my comment as a more flushed out answer then, as it as a very different take to your own answer, and so gives the community access to the tooling we need here; voting. ;)
    – Thom A
    Commented Jun 4 at 8:54
  • (I plan to accept an answer once I think there is enough Community consensus or CMs/moderators have a decision and make it clear that this is a decision and not just a personal opinion)
    – dan1st
    Commented Jun 4 at 9:19

2 Answers 2

11

I would suggest that you still judge the question on its merits; if the question is a good on-topic question, and it can be answered (by others) in the community, then it should be promoted to the site. Even if the OP doesn't want to answer it themselves, someone else might want to and then that question and answer will hopefully be useful to future users that have the same problem; which is really what Stack Overflow is all about.

If the question cannot be answered (as the information is missing) then has the OP given the missing information in the comments? If so, and the OP doesn't want to make the improvements themselves, then edit the question yourself and then push it to be promoted to the site.

Finally, if the context to solve the problem is missing, then mark it as requiring major changes. I would like to hope we can encourage the user to make the changes in the comments, and that they do, but I admit that the users are likely under no compulsion to do so; they have an answer to their question; as new users, they likely aren't aware that the goal of Stack Overflow isn't to just help them but anyone who has the same question.

I suppose, if they end up in a question ban, maybe they'll choose to edit it in the future, as if it's promoted and well written, it might help them get out of that ban (but I'm guessing how workflows work and hypotheticals now).

13
  • One issue I would think about with this approach that this is publishing questions that the author is (somewhat) likely to delete which they can as long as their is upvoted answer AFAIK. Publishing questions that the author doesn't want to be published is counter-productive in my opinion and it may also be confusing to the author ("Why is the question published when it's solved?").
    – dan1st
    Commented Jun 4 at 9:03
  • 4
    "publishing questions that the author doesn't want to be published is counter-productive in my opinion" If the OP doesn't want their question on the site, they shouldn't be posting it on the site. I'm pretty sure that posting your question, whether it ends up in the SG or not, is still licenced under CC-BY-SA, and so deleting the question like that would be a flaggable action.
    – Thom A
    Commented Jun 4 at 9:06
  • 3
    " it may also be confusing to the author ("Why is the question published when it's solved?")" that leads back to my point, @dan1st, that the site isn't just for them; questions, and their answers, are for any one with the same problem. Posting a question isn't to just get you the answer, it's to get the answer for any one with that same question. It doesn't matter if the user who posted the question solved the problem, it's that others also will want to solve it. This xkcd come to mind.
    – Thom A
    Commented Jun 4 at 9:08
  • Even though the site is not just for the author, I think confusion should still be avoided and that should at least be explained to the author (why the question is published but also why they should make changes if something is missing as opposed to just abandoning it).
    – dan1st
    Commented Jun 4 at 9:09
  • 2
    So, even better onboarding, @dan1st ? :)
    – Thom A
    Commented Jun 4 at 9:10
  • 1
    We have to take what we can get (I guess comments in this case). With the Staging Ground, we have comments. Also I don't know how bad it is to have potentially a lot of posts that are deleted right after being asked (and how any moderation tooling likes that)
    – dan1st
    Commented Jun 4 at 9:12
  • Yeah, a lot of this is likely hypothetical, and could void once the tool comes out.
    – Thom A
    Commented Jun 4 at 9:12
  • It is but due to the question about tooling in the SG beta team being marked as [status-deferred] recently, I think it's unlikely there's something being done about this (though I would love to be surprised in this regard). Also with moderation tooling (like question bans or things informing moderators, I don't know what exactly is in place there), I meant already existing tooling that may not like deleting posts.
    – dan1st
    Commented Jun 4 at 9:14
  • I have now accepted this answer as people seem to agree with it (although I'm personally against approving questions if the OP doesn't want the question to be approved).
    – dan1st
    Commented Jun 9 at 12:13
  • 2
    "I'm personally against approving questions if the OP doesn't want the question to be approved" I really don't understand that stance, if I'm honest, @dan1st . Again, if they didn't want the question approved then they shouldn't have posted it in the first place.
    – Thom A
    Commented Jun 10 at 8:03
  • Because I (as a reviewer) cannot typically judge the whether it's solved in a typo-way or not (I often have no idea what actually solved the issue from reading the OP's comment, especially when it just sais something like "I solved it"). If the author thinks it's worth mentioning their solution, it might also be useful for future readers.
    – dan1st
    Commented Jun 10 at 8:41
  • If you're not sure if it's on-topic, @dan1st, then skip.
    – Thom A
    Commented Jun 10 at 8:42
  • I meant that I wouldn't know whether the OP resolution was something like "I made a typo here" or something else because the OPs sometimes don't include that in their "solved" comments. In the first case, it would be off-topic but in the second case it might not be and it's not something another reviewer could know. Also as (I think) I mentioned before, it could be confusing for the OP to get their question published for answering after they solved it (so I think at least an explaining comment should be added) and I would personally prefer to not approve posts likely being deleted by the OP.
    – dan1st
    Commented Jun 10 at 8:46
2

I'll just explain what I did during the beta. I don't claim this is the best way to do this but I want to suggest what I believe is a reasonable approach (feel free to write other answers if you have different ideas).

I personally think the question author should decide on what happens. If the author doesn't want to write an answer, they can't be forced to self-answer the question and users deleting their questions is typically considered acceptable if there are no answers and there are no answers in the Staging Ground anyways. On the other hand, authors should be able to answer their own question if they want to (at least in my opinion).

Because of this, I think it's best to mark the question as Requires Major Changes with a comment asking the author whether they want their question published and inform them about the possibility of self-answering. During the Beta, I used comments similar to:

Do you want your question to be published and post an answer yourself so that future readers can see it or do you want to keep it unpublished?

If the question still needs some work by the author, that can be included in the comment as well, for example:

Do you want your question to be published and post an answer yourself so that future readers can see it or do you want to keep it unpublished? If you want it to be published, please [edit] your question and include XYZ.

If the author addresses the necessary changes afterwards, I would approve/publish the question such that the author (or others) can answer it. If not, the question should stay in the Staging Ground.

During the beta phases, I used this approach and made the following observations:

  • In most cases (I have seen), the author (unsurprisingly) doesn't want the question to be published so they can self-answer them (but this is different in some cases).
  • Even if the questions are answerable from the information in the question (and complying with the asking guidelines), these questions are typically not that good and I don't think they would typically lead to many other useful answers.
  • I often can't judge whether what the asker wrote in a comment (assuming they did write a comment saying what "solved" it) actually is a solution that makes sense with respect to how the answer was written due to not being a subjext-matter expert.
4
  • 3
    I'm not sure I do like the OP "choosing". If the question is a good question, "locking" it inside the SG doesn't help those with the same problem in the future find the solution. In fact new users, those who will end up in the SG, are very likely the ones that understand the goal of Stack Overflow the least, and so are likely the worst at determining if the post should, or shouldn't end up on the main site (after they've got their answer). If it's a good question, we really should be encouraging them to get the question into a position where it's answerable by the community.
    – Thom A
    Commented Jun 4 at 8:52
  • 1
    I also don't think it's ideal but reviewers are (in general) not subject-matter experts so they don't know how useful the question will be. If there are still important things missing, the question can still be kept in the Staging Ground.
    – dan1st
    Commented Jun 4 at 8:54
  • If the question is one that can be published, why should it be marked needs major changes? if it isn't one that can be published, then it should be marked for the reason it can't be published until the op fixes it. if they abandon it because they've got their fish, that's no different than them deleting it.
    – Kevin B
    Commented Jun 4 at 14:41
  • 2
    The idea behind using Requires Major Changes is that it isn't published without the author wanting it (since there's no other way to do this).
    – dan1st
    Commented Jun 4 at 14:59

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .