-7

I posted a question—size_t == sizeof (uint64_t) not returning expected results—which was closed for "This question needs debugging details. It is not currently accepting answers."

I don't dispute that close reason; I was genuinely unable to provide a minimal repro case. Nonetheless, a commenter was able to determine my problem and provide a solution that worked perfectly for me. Is it appropriate to ask to reopen the question, so they can make it an "accepted answer" and get credit for their help, even though the question still doesn't meet the site guidelines?

14
  • 7
    Given you now know the solution, you should know the problem enough to provide a minimal reproducible example yes? If so just edit your post to add the MRE and submit it to the reopen votes queue. Commented May 17 at 19:37
  • @AbdulAzizBarkat The MRE would still require turning ~100,000 lines of code, much of which I understand very little of, into something reasonable sized. Given that my actual problem is resolved, I'm probably not going to sink the kind of time required for that. Commented May 17 at 19:46
  • 10
    A user was able to point out the problem in the comments surely you can create a sample that reproduces that same problem? I am not an SME so I can't really advice further, maybe someone with expertise can guide you further. Commented May 17 at 19:52
  • @AbdulAzizBarkat There's a lot of code involved that I didn't write (and much of it in a language I know only the basics of), and a .dll build process that I can do because I followed a well-written instructional and not because I know what I'm doing. I have no doubt that it is possible to create an MRE from the information available, I just don't have the skills to do it in a reasonable time frame. I have a "Maximal Reproduceable case", but (A) it's far too large and (B) it includes some proprietary stuff I can't post anyway. Commented May 17 at 19:59
  • I just want the opportunity to give credit to someone who genuinely helped me (without violating community standards to do so) Commented May 17 at 19:59
  • 2
    size_t == sizeof(uint64_t) does not make sense. You cannot compare a type with a value. As to whether some_size_t_var == sizeof(uint64_t), that depends on what you put in some_size_t_var.
    – CPlus
    Commented May 17 at 20:14
  • 12
    @Alpocalypse - We are not a help desk. If you don’t know enough to provide a MRE it’s difficult for you to evaluate if an answer actually is correct. If you can’t create a MRE how will anyone verify their problem is identical to their problem and thus the answer you receive applies to their problem also? Commented May 17 at 20:41
  • @SecurityHound well of course I can evaluate if its right because it fixes my bug, but I get your point that it isn't particularly helpful to the community if they can't repro. Thank you all for the feedback! Commented May 17 at 20:46
  • 1
    @Alpocalypse - Let me see if I can help you create a functional MRE. You received feedback your conditional statements were only half complete. You need to provide code that evaluates the size of your object, which you are comparing to size of sizeof(uint64_t). Show code that determines the size of *mySize_tObject. This allows you to implement the suggested: “Then you need to use the debugger on the C++ side to see what the actual values are.” Commented May 17 at 21:03
  • 12
    "The MRE would still require turning ~100,000 lines of code, much of which I understand very little of, into something reasonable sized." No, it wouldn't. It would require starting over and creating a few lines of code that directly cause the problem to occur reliably, now that you know what causes it. There is no requirement for code in Stack Overflow questions to have anything to do with your actual codebase, or anyone else's. Commented May 17 at 22:23
  • 6
    "There's a lot of code involved that I didn't write (and much of it in a language I know only the basics of), and a .dll build process that I can do because I followed a well-written instructional and not because I know what I'm doing." - and almost none of it has anything to with the question, or answer. We know this, because someone else was able to answer without seeing whatever giant mass of proprietary stuff. Commented May 17 at 22:25
  • 2
    If you want to add value to Stack Overflow, and I hope you do, you should seriously consider working backward from the answer to a minimal reproducible example. It may be that you started out not knowing where the problem was, but now that you know where it is a MRE should be possible. Commented May 18 at 12:31
  • 2
    Not all questions, even good questions, are good Stack Overflow questions. Commented May 19 at 0:46
  • "I don't dispute that close reason; I was genuinely unable to provide a minimal repro case." Excellent! Now don't forgo the opportunity to learn from it. You don't go ahead and post a question anyway; posting questions is a privilege, not a right. A privilege you can lose on this site by the way. If you can't make a post Stack Overflow-compatible... well there is Reddit, Discord, Quora, Codidact. So many alternatives where you can actually ask for the help you need.
    – Gimby
    Commented May 23 at 8:26

1 Answer 1

12

Is it appropriate to reopen a "closed for not enough detail" question if a solution was found anyway?

No. The problem with the question still remains. Closing a question as needing details/clarity on Stack Overflow does not mean "this question is unanswerable forever, by everyone"; it means "in its current state, this question is off-topic on Stack Overflow".

The reason for this is that, even though sometimes users might be able to guess or find an answer to a question that lacks details, they can't always do that, and if we were to allow answering partially-formed questions in some cases, we'd have to allow them for all such cases. And that... would drastically reduce the quality of the average question or answer on the site, running directly counter to the original site mission: providing a high quality Q&A repository for programming questions/problems and their solutions.

1
  • And how does one sleep at night knowing a low-value question has been answered incorrectly and then mysteriously and repeatedly UV'd for inexplicable reasons? The OP could have found their own answer in any textbook, even referenced in the Table of Contents and Index, or myriad examples available on SO. The answer does not answer the OP's (implied) question... Message me and I will, again, provide a link to one Q&A that rankles involving a low-rep asker and a hi-rep answerer...
    – Fe2O3
    Commented May 21 at 11:34

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .