-33

I posted ~1850 answers between March 2023 and April 2024, including ~1100 answers to bountied questions during their bounty periods. Of those 1850 answers, about two-thirds were based on generative AI content.

I would like to sincerely apologize for the series of answers I posted on Stack Overflow over the past 13 months, which were based on outputs generated from an AI tool (before being reworked, researched, and sourced).
I understand that this action was against Stack Overflow's community guidelines, which explicitly ban the use of generative AI for creating posts.

I do regret my posts, not only because they violated Stack Overflow's trust, but also because they potentially misled other users relying on the content I posted. My intentions were to contribute helpful information, but I realize I went about this in the wrong way.

I do acknowledge that I used AI tools to assist in creating content, which is clearly prohibited on the platform.
I accept full responsibility for my actions. All 1850 posts have been deleted.

I do understand the negative impact my actions could have had on the community. By using AI-generated content, I contributed to the dilution of the quality of answers on the platform, potentially affecting the trust and reliability that Stack Overflow works hard to maintain.

I will no longer be using any AI tools, and will only contribute by providing answers based solely on my own knowledge and expertise in future contributions.

So I apologize:

  • to the community I misled,
  • to the moderators (who are busy enough without my shenanigans),
  • to the Stack Overflow staff who expect better from me.
63
  • 54
    Huge kudos for accepting and owning what you did and being prepared to move past it 👏 Commented May 2 at 15:28
  • 19
    I appreciate the post, certainly, and was hoping to see it. It's certainly been an "unusual" situation. I'd add to the consequences that the community has been deprived of many answers that we know you were certainly capable of answering without AI assistance during that time. Looking forward to getting back to VonC-business-as-usual ;-) Commented May 2 at 15:28
  • 100
    You're a rather well-established user by nearly all metrics on the site, so I assume you understood the rule banning genAI content the entire time. I'm curious what the motivation was... did it seem like starting with genAI allowed you to write significantly more answers than you could otherwise? Or was it more about enjoying the fun of a novel ability (being able to generate somewhat usable programming content via a tool for the first time)?
    – TylerH
    Commented May 2 at 15:40
  • 16
    As someone who has been identifying AI here for a while now, I'm truly curious about a few technical details, if you don't mind my asking. Some of the content was clearly from ChatGPT (the GPT4 model, at that, at least for a portion). But were there any other generative AI tools involved? At times, it almost seemed like you had a custom embedding or RAG based on Git information, but that could be purely my overactive imagination and was, in reality, based on your in-depth knowledge of that subject matter. Commented May 2 at 18:35
  • 91
    Huh. This post is a bit odd. The tone feels rather like the compelled apology of a scandal-wracked celebrity, but that's a minor point; the bigger one is that you don't address why you did this in the first place. As @TylerH asks, what was the motive? Was it for rep, to play with a new toy, or to help people at larger scale? Do you actually think you were helping people (and that, regardless of the rules, it's a loss to the site that you got busted and the answers nuked)? What can the rest of us learn from this odd saga? You don't say, which leaves me unsure what purpose this post serves.
    – Mark Amery
    Commented May 3 at 13:36
  • 50
    You haven't explained why you did it.
    – camden_kid
    Commented May 3 at 15:58
  • 27
    To clarify, did you decide to confess on your own, or were you caught?
    – Ray
    Commented May 3 at 19:39
  • 18
    @NoDataDumpNoContribution - Suspect a case of “this user has more reputation than the top .1% of the user base” bias was in effect, and nobody thought someone with a history of submitting quality answers, would ever intentionally break the rules so flagrantly. Confused by the light punishment. A user who submitted a half dozen ChatGPT answers was suspended for a year. A user submitting hundreds or thousands of ChatGPT answers should not get the same punishment Commented May 3 at 19:57
  • 21
    Honestly, it’s nice that you will move forward - but having thought about this, I don’t know how to move forward. This is a massive loss of trust into established community members that seems so far completely unheard of. It’s one thing that new actors don’t care, but this puts into question many of the foundations of the community and knowledge repository. (I might put this into a proper answer in case I find myself having any … left.) Commented May 4 at 8:04
  • 32
    The more I think about it the more I'm convinced that even this is AI generated
    – camden_kid
    Commented May 4 at 13:21
  • 31
    @TamásSengel Integrity? Where was that when he was posting over a thousand AI-generated/AI-assisted answers, knowingly breaking the rules? Apologizing after getting caught is not a display of integrity. Integrity is not knowingly breaking the rules on this scale (or any scale, for that matter), in the first place.
    – Cerbrus
    Commented May 4 at 15:36
  • 27
    Not rhetorical: Before AI was available, how would we have handled a high-rep user being suddenly discovered to have 1k+ (out of ~30k) plagiarized answers? Would we have issued a short suspension and done our best to clean everything up? Should it be different for AI? Commented May 4 at 21:12
  • 21
    @Displayname VonC didn't delete them. SO moderators / staff did, as they were in clear violation of SO's rules...
    – Cerbrus
    Commented May 4 at 21:57
  • 15
    @yivi In my opinion this post is suited for MSO as this apology (or at least the action of posting these AI-generated answers which is also documented with this post) has some significance and there is actually Community discussion here (this should be obvious from the comments and answers). Also, it would be possible for VonC to answer questions the Community has (e.g. about his motivation) here (whether or not he plans to do so is their decision).
    – dan1st
    Commented May 5 at 12:22
  • 22
    @VonC: I think that I speak for many in inviting you to address in comment, or as an edit to your original post, some of the more common, pertinent, and non-inflammatory issues that have been brought up in many of the comments and several of the answers. Hearing more from you would be instructive to all of us. Commented May 7 at 21:10

8 Answers 8

153

I can't say I'm very impressed with an apology after the fact, after apparently being caught.
While I can appreciate the transparency, I can't look past the fact that you should've known better than to do this in the first place. I mean, 1850 (now deleted) posts, of which about 1200 were (partially) AI-generated? That's a lot of flouting the rules, and consistently so over a long time span...

I've seen users get suspended for posting AI-generated content. Having your answers deleted isn't "punishment". That's just standard cleanup.

I mean, I really don't get comments like "You're proving once again that you're a great person." How does this make anyone a great person? It's abuse of the site on a significant scale, which got caught, resulting in an apology after the fact... That's damage control.

A "great person" wouldn't have flouted the rules to start with.

So, where am I going with this?

  • I'm not seeing any genuine remorse.
    It's a political apology. "I've been bad", "I'm sorry I've been bad", immediately followed by an excuse: "My intentions were to contribute helpful information".

  • There's no reason provided as to why OP knowingly flouted the rules (on a significant scale).

  • The only apparent "punishment" has been the deletion of the answers.
    That's just standard cleanup. Are we making an exception because OP's a high-rep, high-contributing user?

  • It took way too much effort to get a straight answer from anyone stating, "yes, he's been suspended for 7 days."
    I get that suspension reasons are privacy-sensitive, but the fact that someone was suspended isn't.

Sorry, but I'm less than impressed.
You should have known better and you're getting off easily.


More than a week has passed since this "Apology" was posted, and OP still hasn't answered a single point raised by any of the answers or comments.

I get that this is not a nice position to be in, but it's one of his own making.

It feels like OP is just ignoring this problem now, or hiding from it, which makes me wonder why he posted this in the first place. The more he pretends the responses to his apology don't exist, the more disingenuous it looks, to me.

41
  • 23
    If someone committed a real crime and serviced their sentence, then I believe everyone deserves a second chance to get on with their lives. But this is can't be compared with an actual crime, it's just someone blatantly breaking an Internet site's rules in order to gain imaginary internet points. And besides, they have permanently lost all domain expert credibility now, so it's not like they can continue using the site meaningfully, at least not under that account. A lot of people get banned for like 1 year for CoC violations (and perhaps rightly so), so it does smell like double standards.
    – Lundin
    Commented May 3 at 7:53
  • 38
    @blackgreen Your own answer suggests that he did get special treatment, in the form of a lot of people weighing in on the situation, (maybe even CMs?). That's not the same treatment a newly registered user gets after submitting a couple of LLM answers. Again, I'm writing from what I can see here. And it doesn't look great.
    – Cerbrus
    Commented May 3 at 7:55
  • 35
    The main issue I have here is that disciplinary actions/punishments seem so arbitrary on this network. There doesn't seem to be any relation between the severity of the offense and the disciplinary actions, except for those who are repeatedly breaking rules. I often come across "1 rep" users and then you peek at their account and notice they've been suspended for 6 months to a year. I have of course no idea what offense that such users committed, but mass posting thousands of answers in blatant violation of the site rules seems pretty serious to me.
    – Lundin
    Commented May 3 at 8:04
  • 50
    Then why be vague about it? The way you've written that answer almost looks as if a task force was set up to handle that situation. I mean, read this: "multiple people spent a great deal of time <cut (char limit)> while being fair at the same time." That comes across as a lot of effort that went into this. Again, I'm going by what I can see here and what's communicated here. What "us ordinary users can see" is that he got his >1000 answers deleted and a slap on the wrist, whilst he's being praised for "apologizing".
    – Cerbrus
    Commented May 3 at 8:08
  • 16
    And you can't blame me for trying to puzzle together the pieces @blackgreen. "Why be vague about it" was directed to OP as much as it was to you. If he was suspended, why not just state so in the OP? (I still don't know if he was or not). "Suspensions are not a punishment"... Wat.
    – Cerbrus
    Commented May 3 at 8:19
  • 53
    What's really bothering me, though, is that he's just being praised here. He abused the system on a massive scale. He got caught. His answers got deleted, but he retained a lot of rep. He wrote a political apology. There's nothing to praise here. His past activity and helpfulness are undisputable, but they're not relevant.
    – Cerbrus
    Commented May 3 at 8:21
  • 15
    So, us "normal users" might as well not contribute here, because we can't know all the pieces... Come on. Please don't be so negative, @blackgreen. Try to understand our perspective.
    – Cerbrus
    Commented May 3 at 8:29
  • 12
    To add some context (or a "missing piece") they were suspended for a week, there were 3 MSO posts and 1 MSE post that skirted around this suspension (Discussing a specific deleted answer and one directly asking about the suspension reason). This particular Meta post was posted just after the end of the suspension period. Commented May 3 at 8:34
  • 31
    The practical consequences of this is that this is a huge encouragement to all users who like to "gamify" the system, to mass spam plagiarism and AI generated content all over the site. Everyone is allowed to do that once, at any scale, until they get caught. If you are a new user with no rep, you have nothing to lose but everything to gain from that. And surely the new users won't get treated any harsher since there are no double standards.
    – Lundin
    Commented May 3 at 9:02
  • 39
    @DalijaPrasnikar That is the consequence, since the suspension for posting 1850 AI generated posts is the same as the suspension for posting 1 AI generated post. The only difference is that some user who posted 1 such post and then stopped was caught early on. Whereas in the 1850 posts case, they kept breaking the rules over and over and over, despite the featured meta post which has been sitting on the main site for over a year. They were just not caught by a moderator. There are apparently no punishments handed out retroactively.
    – Lundin
    Commented May 3 at 9:20
  • 26
    @DalijaPrasnikar It also wouldn't take 13 months and 1850 posts before a new (or low rep) user got suspended, surely. Without knowing how the moderation team works, I assume it also wouldn't take "multiple people spending a great deal of time" before punishing said user. Commented May 3 at 9:21
  • 21
    @Cerbrus I 100% agree with you. OP was a role model and breaking rules for a period of more than a year is just not acceptable. Their apology is appreciated but, posting 1000+ banned posts I cannot comprehend. Commented May 3 at 10:26
  • 25
    I doubt it's cultural, seems like a perfectly normal interpretation to me (and there's some research to back that up as well: "An apology does not help at all after clearly intentionally committed offenses.".) Commented May 3 at 10:46
  • 30
    I don't know what there is to discuss here really, but I totally agree with the sentiment. I don't know what users typically get for posting AI-generated content, but besides rep lost due to answers being deleted (not that it could make much of a dent to +1.3M rep, mere pocket change by comparison) aside, we've seen users get slapped with much longer bans for less. This is just like when celebrities get off with some light community service and a well-scripted public apology. The praise just seems... bizarre, I just don't get it.
    – Drew Reese
    Commented May 3 at 16:40
  • 23
    Suspensions are punishment to most users on the receiving end. It doesn't matter that they're not "meant" to be punishment. Saying suspensions aren't punishment is akin to a bully saying "It was just a joke". It's only a joke if both parties laugh. Even if you don't use it as punishment, even if you don't intend it to be punishment, IT IS perceived as such. Heck, ask anyone that's been suspended on SO.
    – Cerbrus
    Commented May 4 at 15:32
76

Concerning rep retained

I accept full responsibility for my actions. All 1850 posts have been deleted.

Despite the post deletions, you have retained approximately between 15,000 to 21,000* in reputation from those posts in accordance to the default system logic for retaining reputation on deleted posts (post has score >3 and was deleted 60 days after creation).

To you, that may not sound like much. But that's 75 days of rep cap. That's enough to unlock the third highest level of reputation-based site privilege. Only 0.0735% of users have that much. It's no small amount.

Since you are committing to take responsibility for your actions, I would like to see you follow through by determinedly seeking for that reputation to be scrubbed as well.


*the number 15,000 obtained in the following way:

  • 1355584 - 1193750 - (427*200) = 76434 (2024-04-23 minus rep on rep on 2023-03-01 minus rep in that period from daily rep cap)
  • 1355584 - 1292783 - (7*200) = 61401 (rep on 2024-04-23 minus rep on 2024-05-03 after end of suspension minus rep in that period from daily rep cap)
  • 76434 - 61401 = 15033

Cross checking with SEDE:


I do regret my posts, not only because they violated Stack Overflow's trust, but also because they potentially misled other users relying on the content I posted.

I'm personally surprised that a lengthy compromise of personal integrity isn't on this list. Regrets reflect an understanding of what was wrong. And indeed, you've shown that you have a general understanding of what negative effect this has had on others and on the platform, and have committed not to make this specific rule violation again. But I wonder about deeper lessons learnt...

Re: comments above

Some of the comments above (now deleted) think that these answers were simply to enhance existing subject-matter-expertise. You may want to take a look at this visualization of the variety of tags that VonC answers in over time (this SEDE query includes the posts that have been deleted):

enter image description here

For each month, it shows the sum of the following calculation over each unique tag for which VonC answered any question with that tag in that month: T_tag / T_total, where T_total is the sum over tags in that month of how many tags were in each question VonC answered in that month, and T_tag is the number of questions VonC answered in that month that had that tag. If all questions in a month only have one same tag, then the value for that month is one. More tag variation means higher number. Answering in a tag less than other tags also means higher number.

30
  • 4
    That's 30 bounties, of 500 each. Question is, what questions would be best fit for those bounties. I'd suggest let VonC choose himself. Commented May 3 at 7:44
  • 4
    The reputation can be deducted again by deleting the answers with the dedicated "plagiarism" flag or by dissociating the author from the posts.
    – gparyani
    Commented May 3 at 7:54
  • 14
    Please, please, effing please with a cherry on top, stop caring about highscores. Even if you apply a x2 multiplyer and subtract 30k rep immediately, it would probably still display as 1.3m rep due to rounding, and rep has no practical effects after 5 digits anyways. I can understand if you think there should be more repercussions/punishment, but a very minor rep adjustment that's literally a rounding error is neither of those.
    – l4mpi
    Commented May 3 at 8:51
  • 34
    @l4mpi I disagree. "I can keep the fruits of breaking the rules- fruit which I was intentionally seeking" is not a good moral to the story here. VonC shouldn't be be allowed to keep a crapton of rep from breaking the rules just because they already have a lot of rep.
    – starball
    Commented May 3 at 9:04
  • 35
    @l4mpi "Stop caring about highscores" Considering ~60% of those answers are on bountied questions, it does seem like rep was a major factor and should therefore be removed. Commented May 3 at 9:05
  • 9
    @l4mpi I mean if you think the rep adjustment is minor then it shouldn't really be a problem to forego it right? Reputation is probably one of the motivators behind this and removing that seems fair. In fact if they were to voluntarily do that or ask for it to be removed it would show more reflection than just an apology. Commented May 3 at 9:07
  • 4
    @l4mpi a reset like that would be totally unfair and unjustified. you're not getting me. I'm not looking for punishment or "additional" repercussions. I'm looking for a fair result.
    – starball
    Commented May 3 at 9:23
  • 26
    We are already aware of the fact that reputation was retained on approximately 200 posts. We became aware of it about a day after the deletions were made. The time from then was spent waiting to see if the company had a way to easily remove the reputation, but, so far, that hasn't panned out. Moderators do have a way to remove the reputation, which is, as described above, to delete the posts as plagiarism (a multi-step process). We were, not surprisingly, already aware of that method. It is, and has been, our fallback solution, should the company not have/provide something more appropriate.
    – Makyen Mod
    Commented May 3 at 13:01
  • 11
    In other words, prior to you posting here, we were already aware of the situation that not all the reputation from the posts had been removed. We already had both a proposal/request to the company and a known-working backup plan. The company has been supportive, but, at this point, it's likely we'll go with the backup plan. If we go with the backup plan, then I expect a moderator will write some code to make the process easier, which is also already planned. So, basically, you seem to be upset about something that's already planed to happen, but just hasn't been accomplished yet.
    – Makyen Mod
    Commented May 3 at 13:01
  • 4
    @Makyen any plans to refund bounties to the users who started them at least ones which were awarded early in the bounty period? Looking at their earned bounties there seem to be 600+ answers that had bounties which are now deleted. There are probably some of these bounties which were awarded early on in the bounty period. Commented May 3 at 13:20
  • 27
    @l4mpi "Please, please, effing please with a cherry on top, stop caring about highscores." Given the behavior being discussed in this thread, your request should probably be levied at VonC, not starball.
    – TylerH
    Commented May 3 at 13:41
  • 4
    @TylerH my request to VonC would not be that polite. But the request was directed towards anyone who cares about his rep number being different than it was before the fraud, even though it has literally no effect. IMO that's a waste of time and any energy directed towards that would be better spent on anything else, e.g. discussing if they should suffer any actual consequences besides the short suspension. But wasting more CM or Mod time on a BS number that does literally nothing seems worse than useless.
    – l4mpi
    Commented May 3 at 15:13
  • 23
    @l4mpi It is not BS, it is applying the rules equally every time. If you don't apply them here, then you lose the argument about applying them when a 100 rep user illegally gains 15,000 reputation too, and all other cases. Just because this case is of someone where the rep doesn't make a difference in terms of what they can do doesn't make a difference in terms of whether the rep should be removed. Otherwise a short suspension and a small rep tax is just "the cost of doing business" for rep fraud.
    – TylerH
    Commented May 3 at 15:16
  • 25
    @l4mpi You are missing the point, which is that the rules need to be equal for all users. This isn't animal farm where high-rep users are "more equal" than low-rep users. And the rules being equal mean you remove all the fraudulent reputation, even if it doesn't impact the privileges the user has access to. That's called integrity, consistency, justice. etc.
    – TylerH
    Commented May 3 at 15:24
  • 14
    @l4mpi Sounds to me like you're instead expecting a different punishment, such as a longer suspension, due to the user having more rep than the avg AI abuser. Removal of rep gained and a 1 week suspension is fairly standard, and is applied to all users who abuse AI in this way. Why should the punishment be different in this case?
    – Kevin B
    Commented May 3 at 15:42
51

Well, good for you, I guess.

Yet moving forward is not going to change that, quote, one of the oldest users on the platform by account age and — at the time of writing — the number #2 by all-time reputation, unquote, felt it justified that the rules don’t apply to them. That such a user felt it justified because, quote, [their] intentions were to contribute helpful information, unquote.

That’s exactly the motivation I hear regularly when closing posts, when voting, heck, even when editing or commenting constructively. Go away, we are helping here, we don’t care for your rules!
Sure, one could lie to oneself. Oh, those are new users, they don’t know better. And yada, Yoda, yada…

Now, this isn’t a how dare you post. This isn’t a how could you post.
Because honestly, it doesn’t matter who exactly overstepped the line. There’s another just around the corner, and maybe another right here and just not caught yet.
Maybe I would have met them on the next Q&A I curate. Maybe I will meet them on the next Q&A I rely on for help. But surely I can’t lie to myself anymore that they are not around, that they are not setting such an example. That they are not sabotaging, at a massive scale, why I rely on Stack Overflow for help.

If even people like you don’t give a jam about the rules either, why bother with them?
Apparently, people want that kind of Stack Overflow. Apparently, experts want that kind of Stack Overflow. Well, good for you, I guess. 🎤⬇️

2
  • 16
    Rules matter. Policies matter. Quality matters. Some users do care. Commented May 5 at 5:11
  • 16
    Now, I am thinking about all those 7000+ questions that I have closed as duplicate that could have been answers. Too much Rep lost following the rules, sigh! Commented May 5 at 7:44
42

What happens to the 1850 questions that now have lost answers? This is a mess that still needs fixing.

A query that finds your deleted answers (plus others - I'm not sure how to narrow it down) reveals a bunch of highly upvoted ones (10k-only links to the top 5: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5), all of them on questions that have lots of views and lack any other high-score answer. I imagine that in at least some cases, those were good answers and the questions have become far less useful to future readers as a consequence of their deletion. Were those answers AI-generated? Were they correct? What should we do to fix this situation, now?

This post is pretty frustrating. You apologise but don't explain why or to what extent you used AI to generate posts, why the mods decided to delete all your posts from the time period (even some valuable high-score ones that look to me like they're surely not AI-authored), what rules (if any) the mods have laid down to you about you revisiting those questions and answering them with manually written answers, or what guidelines there are about people farming your deleted answers as a source of inspiration for replacement answers of their own. Those are things I care about far more than your feelings of remorse, and would like to see addressed.

I think we can probably assume that:

  • the one third of answers that you wrote in the time period without AI were generally correct and valuable
  • some proportion of the AI-generated posts were also correct and valuable despite being AI-generated
  • in both cases, the presence of your answers will have tended to deter others from redundantly answering the same questions - meaning the questions from which your useful answers have been deleted will tend to now not have useful answers at all.

So we probably have somewhere from a few hundred to 1850 bricks fallen out of our library that we now need to repair. I ask both you, the mods, and the broader community: how do we do that?

26
  • 6
    Not to mention the bounties awarded to those answers that are now lost. Will the users stat started those bounties get refunded?
    – Cerbrus
    Commented May 3 at 16:19
  • 13
    @Cerbrus A lot of bounties have been lost on AI answers in general, though that's across many, many users. We don't refund those, and I doubt we're going to start now, just because it's difficult to do. Plus, bounties going to waste is an assumed risk, which is part of why bounties are non-refundable. Commented May 3 at 16:22
  • 8
    @Zoe I get what you're saying, but this is a case of a user deliberately hunting bounties with AI... Oh, wait. That's far from unique. Well RIP that bounty rep.
    – Cerbrus
    Commented May 3 at 16:28
  • 14
    @Cerbrus Exactly. Not sure what the current situation is, but right after CGPT became big, nearly every single bounty attracted at least one AI-generated answer, and usually several. Bounties are known honeypots for AI content - and unfortunately, it means this isn't a unique case. It's a large-scale single case, but across all LLM-posting users, 1100 lost bounties is likely a fraction of the total number of bounties thrown at AI answers. I don't have exact numbers in general, nor can I get those numbers without going through at least weeks worth of manual labour Commented May 3 at 16:44
  • 2
    @AbdulAzizBarkat Some were undeleted after the fact, but they were blanket deleted Commented May 3 at 17:37
  • 3
    @Zoe I have a declined flag where I asked the moderators to review the answers deleted by the staff where it states "All answer deletions were confirmed with mods" so you're saying the moderators simply agreed to delete all the answers? No review involved? Commented May 3 at 17:40
  • 6
    @AbdulAzizBarkat They were mostly reviewed after being deleted and on-demand, because going through 1850 answers to check each of them for AI-generated content is an enormous amount of work Commented May 3 at 17:42
  • 3
    @Zoe so my flag decline message is false in the "all answer deletions" part? I'd have simply appreciated being left in the dark then rather than a lie like that (Not blaming you particularly) :( Commented May 3 at 17:44
  • 4
    It seems fairly clear to me... they blanket deleted them all then reviewed and undeleted a number of them. There's no value in getting into specifics on how many were individually reviewed when it's fairly clear which groups of answers are more likely to have been not ai given the past activity of the user.
    – Kevin B
    Commented May 3 at 19:20
  • 3
    @KevinB Sure, but then the message "All answers' deletions were confirmed with the mods" is a bit misleading. It conveys that the mods individually reviewed every single one of the answers as Abdul Aziz perceived as well. Commented May 3 at 19:27
  • 3
    So what? call it misleading, it doesn't matter. you're never going to get a list of what was or wasn't reviewed and it's unrealistic to expect all 1850 to have been individually reviewed in such a short amount of time.
    – Kevin B
    Commented May 3 at 19:31
  • 4
    This is the part of this debacle that feels the ickiest to me; we've presumably lost valuable content that real curators deemed valuable in the meantime. I'm not sure I have anything of value to suggest as a solution, but that's the piece here that hits me the most... We've burned down a chunk of the library because it was tainted, and that's wildly unsatisfying, even though it was justified under the rules.
    – zcoop98
    Commented May 3 at 19:41
  • 4
    @zcoop98 Yeah, taking that into consideration, I really think there should be more consequences for VonC but then on the other side, I'd feel it'd be unfair to give him special punishment at the moment just due to the amount of content that is lost. I think there should be another SO post as a proposal to detail the extents of consequences for varying level of AIGC violations and see what the community says on that. Commented May 3 at 19:46
  • 3
    eh, i wouldn't want a form of punishment/repentance to be answering questions outside of one's conform zone such that they felt the need to use AI to answer them in the first place. Better off letting those questions attract their own answers if they are worthy of answers.
    – Kevin B
    Commented May 3 at 20:55
  • 6
    @PM2Ring Part of the issue here is that at least the highest scored answers look to me like they were not AI-generated in the first place; certainly they can't have been purely authored by AI. They probably simply need undeleting; high-value non-AI answers to highly-viewed questions should not be getting nuked as part of this process. I really wish we had more information about what exactly had happened, because if VonC is now cooperating and knows which two thirds of his answers were AI-generated then it's nonobvious to me why we're nuking any of his other answers at all.
    – Mark Amery
    Commented May 3 at 21:43
13

I believe I can say, on behalf of the Moderation Team, that we accept your apologies.

It is refreshing — and hopefully inspiring for all users who have been or will be in a similar spot — to see that you decided to own up to your mistakes. Thank you for that.

Rest assured, it was not a decision taken lightly: quite the opposite. Without entering into details which might be best kept private, multiple people spent a great deal of time reviewing the situation as thoroughly as it was reasonably possible and making sure Community policy could be upheld while being fair at the same time.

You are one of the oldest users on the platform by account age and — at the time of writing — the number #2 by all-time reputation. We are certain you have abundant real-world expertise in your field, which you have generously contributed to our platform throughout the years. You do not need to resort to underhanded means to keep being the great contributor you have always been.

Welcome back.

10
  • 21
    I personally concur with this.
    – Ryan M Mod
    Commented May 2 at 16:46
  • 51
    For what it's worth, we've handled other major users in similar fashion and sometimes we get ignored, sometimes we get anger, and we've even gotten open defiance. Once in a while you get a contrite private response at best. At the end of the day, suspensions are about getting the behavior stopped. But the best part of this post? It deflates an argument we get in private from others who say we're ignoring others doing it. Nobody is being ignored, we just can't talk about it. Having a public mea culpa we can point to is a boon to the moderation team in that regard.
    – Machavity Mod
    Commented May 2 at 17:44
  • 18
    I also fully agree with what is written here. I would have written something very similar.
    – Dalija Prasnikar Mod
    Commented May 2 at 17:55
  • 2
    I believe that all of the moderators keep the best interests of the community in mind; in particular I have come to hold @Machavity in high regard over the years, and seeing their comments here helps smooth ruffled feathers a bit. It would be a tragicomic understatement to say that I was disappointed to learn of this whole affair, but I don't know that there is any outcome that would have felt satisfying to me. Commented May 5 at 2:06
  • 1
    I assume you moderators deleted these 1850 posts, most of which contained valuable information, and 1850/3 = 616 of which were legitimate. By this, you did a disservice to the community. So just saying "we accept your apologies" is not enough. So, what of these 616 (and possibly more) posts — is anyone going to salvage them? Without any mention, I assume not, but it's important enough to mention explicitly.
    – anatolyg
    Commented May 5 at 7:52
  • 9
    @anatolyg The only person doing any disservice was the author who caused this mess (knowing well enough what will happen to those posts). The mods are doing their job, following established policy. Can't say I envy their position in a situation like this.
    – Dan Mašek
    Commented May 5 at 8:47
  • 2
    Just to make it clear: I don't intend to attack anyone. Please just regard what I write as facts and not an accusation or anything personal. Before deletion of legitimate posts, the site was better than after. I hope people can regard this as fact, without personal connotations, like we always try to do in this site. What I said (and I still want to say) is that we need more information about this. And possibly actions; I'd say we need actions but without any information, I can't say that for sure. This answer looks like a perfect place to put the information.
    – anatolyg
    Commented May 5 at 9:08
  • 5
    @anatolyg This was a bulk action. As a matter of course, we can't review that many posts. VonC did request some undeletions. We were able to get some community memebers to help us review that relatively smaller list and some were undeleted. But we don't have the time to comb each and every post made. If you find one and feel there's a case to be made that it was no AI generated, please mod flag it and we'll take it on a case-by-case basis.
    – Machavity Mod
    Commented May 5 at 12:51
  • 3
    @anatolyg While we re-look at posts if other people flag them, you should only flag such posts because you know that specific post is not AI generated. You should not flag such posts just because you "like" them, think they are "useful", or they have a high score/bounty, because those aren't what's at issue. Such flags should primarily (almost exclusively) be from the original author, as they are the only one who actually knows if AI generation was used on that post. [Unfortunately, authors still commonly lie about that, even in extremely obvious cases (not a comment about VonC).]
    – Makyen Mod
    Commented May 5 at 17:56
  • The moderator message that's sent to users in AI-generated content cases and for plagiarism explicitly tells the user that they are allowed to raise "in need of moderator intervention" to explain the issue on specific posts and ask for the post to be reevaluated. The text also explains how to find their "deleted questions" and "deleted answers" pages, so they can review their deleted posts. Users with >= 10k reputation also can use deleted:yes when searching for their own posts.
    – Makyen Mod
    Commented May 5 at 17:56
-5

I’m very pleased to see this post, and am happy to see the return of an extremely valued member of this community. I hope that everyone involved, and participating on Meta, will continue to handle this with the same measure of grace displayed here. I also wish to thank the moderators for their patience, discretion, and compassion in the handling of this situation.

While we don't believe that an apology to us is necessary - responsiveness to community concerns is in our job, after all - we believe that your acceptance of responsibility is model behavior for the community as a whole.

-5

Disclaimer: I do not wish to accuse and hope this post is not interpreted as any form of speculating about what are private matters. In a healthy relationship, open dialog is essential.

Based on this unfortunate situation, do you (VonC) have any recommendations regarding the efficacy and hazards of the site's "reputation points" gamification on the site's objective: "To be an open repository of quality Q&A for the use of professionals and enthusiasts." [my paraphrase]

Recognized as "the #2 points holder" -- even feted when you achieved your magic 7 digit tally -- I believe most of us would benefit from hearing what possible role the attraction of increasing your points tally (particularly the alluded-to "bounty questions") might have played in clouding your judgement to play by the rules.

If the Garden of Eden tale can provide an allegory for "human nature", resisting temptation is not one of mankind's/womankind's strong suits. Each of us must objectively examine our own private past carefully before even considering picking up a stone to throw.

The "welcome back" reception some have taken the time to post speaks to how the community has come to value your contributions.

Granting your primary motivation was to add to the SO knowledge base, many responses here seem to imply a niggling thought that temptation of "the shiny brass ring" of becoming the leaderboard's #1 may have been a temptation too strong to resist. (Which of us is so upright as to say we would not be tempted, had we been in your position last year?)

As a "celebrate figure" in this corner of cyberspace, your ongoing silence about (with apologies to Clint Eastwood) "A Fistful of Rep Points" and "A Few Rep Points More" creates a harmful vacuum; a vacuum that will only encourage ongoing and harmful speculations.

From your perspective, returning to the fold just a little bruised, please expound on your past and present thoughts about the benefits & hazards of the site's use of intangible reputation points.

In particular, looking toward the future, should the value of an SO question or an SO answer be solely assessed on its merits? Or should the published-everywhere reputation of the author influence the perceived value of a question or answer?

What would you say about "SO reputation points" at present, please? Granting that reputation points played no role in your motivation for 13 months, as a long time member of the community your acknowledgement of this aspect of the affair -- even the perception of this aspect -- may serve to improve the community in some way in the future.

-24

So you have written two things:

  1. (a) I did something wrong.
  2. (a) I apologise for what I did wrong.

There are basically two reactions:

  1. (b) Some people accept your apologies.
  2. (b) Some people find your apologies insufficient.

So, this is what I expect from your side:

  1. (a) I am willing to do things in order to pay back for the bad things I've done.

This is what I expect from other people:

  1. (b) Set up a list of things he can do in order to pay back for the wrong things he did.
  2. (b) Making sure that the list is feasible but sufficiently large.
  3. (b) Any proposals, just for the sake of revenge-seeking, are to be disregarded.

Good luck.

13
  • 3
    3a: I'm not sure what he can do (himself). He can't strip his gained reputation from his account... All he can do is just not do it again, and I hope he holds to that promise.
    – Cerbrus
    Commented May 3 at 9:56
  • 1
    @Cerbrus Or just positively contribute to the site like he was doing before the AIGC posting. Commented May 3 at 10:44
  • 3
    What a lack of commitment here. A person admits doing something wrong and apologises, I give him the opportunity to do more than just that and immediately I get more than ten downvotes. Guys, I've just done a constructive proposal. Is this the way you handle this???
    – Dominique
    Commented May 3 at 11:59
  • 7
    Your proposal is no different from what is expected of every individual that has an account on StackOverflow, positive contribution. However, this expectation is in no way binding and lack of meeting it has no consequences for anyone. The same applies here. We cannot set a list of things for VonC to do for the sake of amendment as it is not within our rights to do so. StackOverflow is an open community where everyone can contribute whenever they like to whatever extent they want in a non-binding manner as long as their contribution is within the rules of the platform. Commented May 3 at 12:41
  • @SyedM.Sannan: who says I'm only allowing him to perform actions on the public part of the website? Let's face it: the longer people contribute to this website, the more they get access. This person has a reputation of +1 million (!!!), so why not giving him access to the non-public part of the website and have him do some actions over there? Seen his remorse he might be very eager to do so and as a plus, he gets access to the hidden "secret chambers" of the StackOverflow community.
    – Dominique
    Commented May 3 at 13:44
  • 14
    @Dominique There are no secret chambers... unless you are talking about becoming a diamond moderator. And for that, there are only two ways: They get hired by StackExchange Inc. as staff and in turn also get the diamond, or by getting elected. Both of them don't seem feasible as StackExchange Inc., the company, would be less interested in this as a whole, and the community won't like to elect them due to what they did. No one can just "give" them access like that. Also, that sounds more like rewarding for bad action, so not a good idea imho. Commented May 3 at 14:14
  • 4
    What is up with the odd "numbering" on the lists? With the latter two lists continuing the previous numbering and letters, but not actually being continuations content wise, this makes no sense to me. Commented May 4 at 7:38
  • 7
    I don’t think there are "things he can do in order to pay back for the wrong things he did". A high rep trusted user deliberately breaking the rules at a massive scale of both content and time just… breaks trust, not only in the offender that was caught. It’s long been a pain point that some people interpret the rules leniently, but this scale puts into question - at least for me - why one should even bother. Commented May 4 at 7:45
  • @MisterMiyagi: the odd numbering is based on the two roles in the conversation: (a) stands for the things, stated by the author and (b) stands for the things, stated by the rest of the audience. Better would be (a.1), (a.2), ... but I fear StackExchange does not cover such numbering style.
    – Dominique
    Commented May 6 at 8:25
  • 1
    @MisterMiyagi: We seem to agree that the author has done something wrong and has apologised for it. The rest of the site could accept this or not (clearly you don't). My attitude consists of turning a bad thing into something good (I admit, this is a very difficult message to pass).
    – Dominique
    Commented May 6 at 8:30
  • 1
    @Dominique I like your ideas in principle, but I'm not sure there's anything VonC can do to make it right. Unless this apology was a spontaneous confession rather than damage control after being caught (which seems unlikely based on what people have said), then the takeaway is that VonC cares about points more than accuracy, and therefore none of their future answers should be trusted either. (I'll also suspect that other >50k users might have similar motivations (honestly, I kind of already did)). The best thing VonC can do is leave the site so others don't accidentally trust their answers.
    – Ray
    Commented May 6 at 14:41
  • i don't really understand all the DV's on this Answer, I've actually UV'ed it... And I also agree with @Ray's analysis, => apology was a bit some damage control I think (mitigated by no response since 8 days = a bit of shame, I would think, not dare to check the Site), and motivation was a bit clearly Rep+Rep = More Rep...! // Give stg back to the Community, I have a great idea: Give the missing Rep-Pts to 50 ["selected" and proven] Users so they get 2k-Rep and can do Edits without wasting/spending 3 full days for editing a Post on 'SO' to improve its Quality...! :idea:
    – chivracq
    Commented May 10 at 6:15
  • 1
    @chivracq I can't remember any selected and proven users on StackOverflow under 2K rep. Well, I mean, I do remember a few, but they usually spent their time in SOCVR and didn't do much on the site itself. You are either less than 2K reputation, or you are a recognized, frequent contributor. Commented May 10 at 16:31

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .