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Stack Overflow blog post A day in the penalty box mentions that an account can be placed in a "timed suspension" from 1 to 365 days.

But I recently came across a user that seems to be suspended for the longest period ever (on Stack Overflow until Dec 28, 2297) perhaps.

My questions are that:

a) What is the reason for choosing the date Dec 28, 2297 for the suspension to end. Is there something special about that particular date and time period of suspension? Maybe this is the last date up to which a suspension is allowed so the moderator just choose the last option.

b) As the user is suspended for such a long time period, my thinking is that they must have done something serious that is not allowed on Stack Overflow, so wasn't/shouldn't deleting their profile instead of suspending for such a long time period makes more sense since they presumably were suspended for something serious. Maybe mods suspended instead of deleting because it is possible that they might change their mind in future for some reason and may unblock the ban before the suspension period is over.

Note that I am not asking the reason they were suspended.

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  • 4
    I also wonder if not-deleting the account will allow for keeping the user from creating a new account as IP's are noted.
    – Paulie_D
    Apr 10 at 13:58
  • I mean, when do we delete? When an account shouldn't have existed or when an angry person requests it because they choose to believe it is an effective way of giving the finger. It is not some kind of super-punishment.
    – Gimby
    Apr 10 at 14:19
  • @Gimby In that case I'm sure the account should've been deleted as per this post where they used foul language. Apr 10 at 14:21
  • Well, at least that account was not suspended from chat for 3000 years.
    – E_net4
    Apr 10 at 14:25
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    Related on MSE: the staff answer to Why not perma-ban instead of suspend an account for 275 years?
    – Andrew T.
    Apr 10 at 17:03
  • I'm not sure "temporary" is the right word to use here lol
    – deep64blue
    Apr 10 at 17:50
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    What is the reason for choosing the date Dec 28, 2297 ? Because Dec 29, 2297 would have been excessive.
    – kjhughes
    Apr 10 at 18:16
  • 7
    Maybe the banned person is a physics genius. He's now motivated to advance the high-speed travel to skip time, and have the last laugh Apr 11 at 9:01
  • 12
    Imagine that person starts reusing their id after 200+ years by saying I'm back. Apr 11 at 9:22
  • 1
    If crime was cruel, then the serve time must be much longer to prevent parole. Maybe in few years we will have parole implemented here, that's why extra years, to be absolutely sure. /nod
    – Sinatr
    Apr 11 at 12:22
  • What did that user do? Asking for a friend
    – Spectric
    Apr 11 at 17:55
  • 3
    @Spectric They posted this answer Apr 12 at 1:45
  • 4
    Maybe the user is suspected of being a help vampire 🧛. 275 years is not long enough :-)
    – Stephen C
    Apr 12 at 15:06
  • 2
    jokes on u, user18825286 will come back in 2298. just u wait!!!!!!!! Apr 12 at 19:06

1 Answer 1

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What is the reason for choosing the date Dec 28, 2297 for the suspension to end. I mean is there something special about that particular data and time period of suspension. May this is the last date upto which a suspension is allowed so the moderator just choose the last option.

Only CMs can suspend that long, so technically, mods didn't issue the suspension (though I assume a mod asked for one at some point). Your speculation is sort of right though. The usual process is inserting a sufficient number of 9s into the number of days to suspend. In this case, that number is 99999 days. I'm not sure if that's the maximum number of days possible, but that's already 273 years - even if more is technically doable, it isn't practically necessary.

Maybe mods suspended instead of deleting because it is possible that they might change their mind in future for some reason and may unblock the ban before the suspension period is over.

Deleting an account is sort of reversible. There are no restrictions on creating new accounts1. Suspensions that long exist to deal with a major system limitation in preventing certain users from creating new accounts by effectively locking accounts for the near foreseeable future.

This is, effectively, our equivalent to deleting accounts on some other platforms. It's not great, but that's the system we need to live with.

Also, it's worth noting that suspensions lasting hundreds of years are exceptionally rare. They're not given out at random, and involves Stack employees making the decision. Because of how serious it is to suspend for that long, it isn't a decision that's taken lightly nor often.

1: There are no technical restrictions, aside the built-in spam prevention system. There are lots of restrictions on what the accounts can be used for (for example, ban evasion and sockpuppetry isn't allowed), but these aren't technical restrictions, and therefore outside the scope of this answer.

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    Calling the next 273 years "near foreseeable" :D
    – bad_coder
    Apr 10 at 18:30
  • 2
    @bad_coder in terms of SO's business plan ;)
    – srn
    Apr 11 at 4:50
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    1) Only Ron Maimon got the 270 years long ban, no other 2) no one (incl. you) have any idea, what he did. He "helped" a physics nobel lauretae to not participate the Physics SE any more, that might qualify, but nothing is known. 3) That is right that only SE employee can give network-wide ban, but that these wouldn't be "decision that's taken lightly nor often", well I doubt it. I am nearly sure that a pair of CMs can network-ban anyone for anything (technically already 1 is enough but this 1 still needs social support) and they do not think even a lot. That is not this company.
    – peterh
    Apr 12 at 9:56
  • 4) The 99999 day happened either becuase the relevant CM finally found that textbox on the admin GUI and tried it, or as some "special attention" to show, they are really angry. 5) Btw, Ron got first only the usual about decade long network ban, it increased later to 99999 days, what makes likely that he did some... really unforgivable, maybe as a revenge / resistance while he was banned. | But these all are specualitions and probably no one knows the reality except the old PSE mods and some old CMs. The old CMs have probably long forgotten it.
    – peterh
    Apr 12 at 9:59
  • In generally, you are striking against them, obviously you are not very happy with their decisions. I think, some critical attitude would be very fine against them, most importantly you should watch better, often there are very clear signatures: the CMs and most other SE decision makers are absolutely not one of us, they simply don't understand a lot what is trivial and painful for us, they know absolutely nothing how do we feel, and most importantly: they don't even care. This is why the site network is where it is now.
    – peterh
    Apr 12 at 10:02
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    @peterh "Only Ron Maimon got the 270 years long ban, no other" - several other accounts have. "no one (incl. you) have any idea, what he did" - 1. Ron Maimon was suspended before I became a mod. 2. There are several million users; I don't keep track of all of them. "That is right that only SE employee can give network-wide ban, but that these wouldn't be "decision that's taken lightly nor often", well I doubt it. I am nearly sure that a pair of CMs can network-ban anyone for anything" - Sure, but CMs are still bound by policies. So are mods.
    – Zoe Mod
    Apr 12 at 10:10
  • @Zoeisonstrike Ok, I will check the SEDE, maybe there are some new 99999 day guy. I have never seen these policies, very likely they are "binding" roughly like the meta site are "binding" to the review decisions. The CMs, very likely there are some local, outdated documents, and there is also some "common practice" which is not known in detail but if you "violate" it, they will fire you; and most importantly, all of these rules are applied arbitrarily in the practice.
    – peterh
    Apr 12 at 10:14
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    "The 99999 day happened either becuase the relevant CM finally found that textbox on the admin GUI and tried it, or as some "special attention" to show, they are really angry" - this is blatantly false. "In generally, you are striking against them, obviously you are not very happy with their decisions" - yeah, management's decisions around AI, development resources, and the general direction of the site. CMs are not the problem, and they have increasingly less influence over management (who mainly listen to the shareholders at some level of the now more complex organisational structure).
    – Zoe Mod
    Apr 12 at 10:14
  • @Zoeisonstrike So, that is just an usual, toxic workplace. That makes the best for the CM if the does the least possibly, simply because so is it lesser possible to find a "mistake" in his work.
    – peterh
    Apr 12 at 10:14
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    "Ok, I will check the SEDE, maybe there are some new 99999 day guy" - Look at the one in the question? That's clearly not Ron. There are several both before and after Ron, though I'm not sure why it matters. "I have never seen these policies" - they're a combination of public policies (i.e. the site rules) and internal guidance, split into stuff that mods know about, and stuff only staff knows about. It's not a surprise you haven't seen it. "The CMs, very likely there are some local, outdated documents" - no.
    – Zoe Mod
    Apr 12 at 10:17
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    "and there is also some "common practice" which is not known in detail but if you "violate" it, they will fire you" - if you by "you" mean me/any mod, no. Rules and practices for mods are well-documented internally, and there are well-defined processes before a mod is thrown out. We're not in 2019 anymore. "and most importantly, all of these rules are applied arbitrarily in the practice" - again, categorically false.
    – Zoe Mod
    Apr 12 at 10:18
  • "That makes the best for the CM if the does the least possibly, simply because so is it lesser possible to find a "mistake" in his work" - Also blatantly false; after the last layoffs, individual CMs have had their workloads significantly increased, both because of the reduction in workforce, but also because management (which, again, is at least one layer above CMs) have decided to throw more work at them. See, among other things, discussions (though mainly prior to switching to dedicated discussions mods) and the attempted 1-rep voting proposal
    – Zoe Mod
    Apr 12 at 10:21
  • @Zoeisonstrike That means that a CM has today even much lesser way to even know, why was Ron Maimon banned for 270 years, s/he can not even ask for it, and s/he knows very well, it is better to not ask anything. Beside that, the company still pays well, and is famous, even on the USA standards, however it is a seriously parkinsonised hierarchy. I think it is well visible, what should one do, working here. Remaining silent, collect the cash and the work years, and keeping warm the secondary lines, if the unavoidable firing happens. Now imagine a company where everyone works on this way.
    – peterh
    Apr 12 at 22:23
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    @peterh - Why do you care about a user, who broke the rules, then was banned from the community? Apr 13 at 5:42
  • 3
    @peterh - Users are not suspended for 270 years without a reason. What does a fish have to do with anything? Apr 13 at 20:51

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