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I have a couple of questions that are about building C++ with Bazel. I tagged then with , but that tag was removed from both (by the same person fwiw). That doesn't make sense to me. Is there some community rule I'm missing? I don't see it in the tag info.

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    Is the problem in C++ code? If not, then generally it's considered irrelevant.
    – vandench
    Apr 5 at 14:43
  • @vandench probably not
    – joel
    Apr 5 at 14:45
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    I'm surprised you say it's irrelevant, because things like understanding compiler flags is very C/C++ specific
    – joel
    Apr 5 at 14:47
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    Then you'll generally find people will remove the C++ tag. An similar example I found recently was a question tagged with Vulkan, but the problem was entirely within STL. Someone with experience in STL wouldn't need to know anything about Vulkan to solve the problem, and someone's Vulkan experience wouldn't provide anything of value to solving the problem.
    – vandench
    Apr 5 at 14:48
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    What does "building C++" mean? Compiling and linking C+++ code (and testing)? As in build systems? E.g., using Make and CMake? Apr 6 at 19:34
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    @PeterMortensen Bazel is a build system
    – Zoe Mod
    Apr 6 at 19:50
  • @PeterMortensen compiling and linking. I'm using Bazel. I guess it applies to Make and CMake but I'm unsure
    – joel
    Apr 7 at 18:22
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    @joel "I'm surprised you say it's irrelevant, because things like understanding compiler flags is very C/C++ specific" - Indeed! And that is where our personal responsibility becomes hard but necessary. If the question is about compiler flags... is it still a Bazel question? Or is it maybe not specifically a question about compiler flags, but more a "how do you pass arguments to an executable" type of question which isn't related to C++?
    – Gimby
    Apr 9 at 15:17

3 Answers 3

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From my understanding, a question about building C++ code with an intermediate build tool should be tagged both with a programming language and with a build tool. So, your last question should be tagged both with and .

It is true that a C++ expert without Bazel knowledge may not understand the question. But it is also true that a Bazel expert, who normally builds Java applications, may not understand the question about C++.

Most likely, to understand the question a person should be an expert in both fields - Bazel and C++. But we don't have a tag , so we need to resort to separate tags.

Actually, such tags separation is not so bad: in my Stack Overflow usage experience I have answered some questions about the combination of technologies even when I completely lacked expertise in one of those technologies. In those questions my knowledge in one of the technologies involved was sufficient to greatly reduce the "unknown area", so several minutes of googling gave me all information necessary to solve the problem.

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    This is valid as long as the same question would not equally apply to building code for another language. Right now, as I read the example question that I investigated, my impression is that there is not yet a reason that the question is language-specific, nor even compiler-specific. It appears that the substance of it may be as simple as "how do I instruct Bazel to pass a custom command-line option to the compiler?", or perhaps "why doesn't [attempt X] accomplish [the preceding]?". Apr 5 at 16:46
  • 'It appears that the substance of it may be as simple as "how do I instruct Bazel to pass a custom command-line option to the compiler?"' - A funny thing that only expert (in Bazel and, probably, in some languages) could perform such generalization. What is wrong in having language-specific tag until the question will be generalized by an expert? Also, it could be possible for both questions to co-exist, a generalized and a specific one. I remember many specific questions which have a solution absolutely not suitable for the generalized variant.
    – Tsyvarev
    Apr 5 at 17:15
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    "What is wrong in having language-specific tag until the question will be generalized by an expert?" Probably nothing. But for that to work, there needs to be a culture of removing the tag once it's known to be irrelevant. Just like how there's nothing wrong with proactively stating, say, which version of Python is in use, but that information should only be left in when it's actually relevant to the problem. Apr 5 at 17:47
  • I am also not sure if a [bazel-c++] tag would be useful, particularly that part of the questions would be tagged as [bazel][c++].
    – peterh
    Apr 7 at 9:50
  • @peterh I agree; using both existing tags is superior. The hyphenated tags are for cases where the first term disambiguates the second; e.g. [python-import] refers to the process (and semantics) of importing modules in Python, which is Python-specific. (Although this example is marginal; the combination [python] [import] is also commonly used.) Bazel, on the other hand, does not define a different variety of C++. Apr 7 at 20:29
  • @KarlKnechtel: Basel does not define a variant of C++, but it's quite feasible that "C++ project" is a variant of Basel, with myriad subcommands or rules added to the generic build system, specifically for C++ support.
    – Ben Voigt
    Apr 8 at 15:04
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Use tags primarily (almost exclusively) to indicate what kind of expertise is required in order to answer the question.

Building C++ may require some understanding of C++, for example, if your build is failing with a linker error. (If it's failing before link time, then you purely have a C++ question and not a question about building a project - we don't care about what you were doing when you noticed the error; we care about what the error is and what causes it.)

If your question is about understanding the semantics of a particular compiler's flags, that makes it a question about that compiler, not the language it compiles - unless a proper explanation of the semantics would require reference to the language standard.

But it looks to me like your most recent question, for example, is not even about that. It is purely about how to configure a build tool, such that it invokes the compiler in the right way. A generic C++ expert gains nothing from that expertise when attempting to answer the question; therefore, it is not a C++ question.

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  • "But it looks to me like your most recent question, for example, is not even about that. It is purely about how to configure a build tool, such that it invokes the compiler in the right way. A generic C++ expert gains nothing from that expertise when attempting to answer the question; therefore, it is not a C++ question." - As a person with some expertise in C/C++ on Linux, I would say that the tool (Bazel) is irrelevant to the problem: it is NOT the consumer library which is needed to be recompiled, it is object file which needs that. How should I tag my expertise without c++?
    – Tsyvarev
    Apr 5 at 15:09
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    "If it's failing before link time, then you purely have a C++ question and not a question about building a project - we don't care about what you were doing when you noticed the error; we care about what the error is and what causes it." - Compiler errors could be caused by missed include directories, macro definitions, compiler switches (e.g. --std=c11). All these things are added by the build tool, not by the C++ code. So why do you think that compiler errors require c++ tag but linker errors like "undefined reference" don't require it?
    – Tsyvarev
    Apr 5 at 15:18
  • Because if a compiler error is caused by a missing include directory then that's a typo. If it's caused by getting a macro wrong, and there's an underlying actual issue with understanding how macros work, that's a C++ question because the preprocessor is part of the language. Undefined references, on the other hand, are about undefined references to symbols. There's exactly one actual C++ question about them, which is the beginner conceptual question about why they happen, what the One Definition Rule is and why it's necessary. And there's a thorough canonical duplicate for that. Apr 5 at 16:05
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    "Because if a compiler error is caused by a missing include directory then that's a typo." - Missed include directory could be caused by misunderstanding of a build tool, which defines its own model of dependencies between libraries/executables created in a project. That model is not a part of C++ standard, so solely C++ expertise won't be sufficient to solve the problem. The same is about linker errors. E.g. in CMake a mis-order of libraries (which could cause "undefined reference" error) is normally solved by adding dependencies between libraries, not by manually adjusting that order.
    – Tsyvarev
    Apr 5 at 16:30
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Yes, absolutelly. Build issues are inseparable part of C++ development, so you will surely find help faster(because this problem most probably was encountred by someone before) and it just make sense, since build tools are part of C++ ecosystem.

Here example of question about OpenCV building error, related to some CMake stuff: Cannot build Opencv project with cmake. This question was not about C++ itself, but about CMake and it's specifics for OpenCV library(probably just like in your case). It has C++ tag, because pain of dealing with CMake can feel only those, who code on C++, even though OpenCV API exists on many other platforms

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    @dre-hh on meta, downvote = disagree with the post. This person seems to think the tag should not be added
    – Elikill58
    Apr 8 at 6:23

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