-37

Is it appropriate to let a questioner know when an answer required excessive hours of expert work?

I enjoy solving complex SQL tasks. It is possible for me to do this because of decades of work with the language. Sometimes a problem takes far longer than I expect, and my Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder causes me to overshare instead of quitting.

When I finally answer the question, I feel compelled to include the number of hours it took me, the level of expertise required, the average salary rate for such an expert, and the total cost if the work was contracted instead of accidentally given away for free.

"Oops! I spent half a day on this. Normally I would charge 40*4=$160 for a solution like this"

7
  • 19
    Ask yourself, would this information help future visitors solve similar problems? The key information in any answer is the answer itself, not how much time it would take X person to complete it. I would leave your "expert hours" out of the answer as it would only serve to detract from the actual answer itself. Commented Apr 5 at 12:48
  • 8
    "Normally I would charge 40*4=$160 for a solution like this" - 4 dollars per hour for 40 hours? Some expert *scoffs* /s Commented Apr 5 at 13:14
  • 4
    I think the easiest is to reason as if you were writing an article for Wikipedia. Whatever you wouldn't put in there, you shouldn't put in a Stack Overflow answer either. I would go as far as to not even ever refer to yourself to be honest. Rather than "I would do the following", I would write "A possible way to do it is" or a variant thereof. We're providing knowledge, not counselling. Perhaps if you avoid putting yourself in the text, it is easier for you to contain the amount of oversharing you want to do? I wouldn't know, I know nothing of your.... speciality.
    – Gimby
    Commented Apr 5 at 13:48
  • 4
    @Nickistired You jest, but even $40/hr is definitely not "SQL expert with decades of experience" territory. More like $200/hr. $40/hr is like 1-5 years of experience, as a salary's hourly rate, not a contract rate.
    – TylerH
    Commented Apr 5 at 14:06
  • 5
    @BartMcEndree And just in case you are concerned (if you are new to Meta), the downvotes on your question do not mean "this is a bad question", they mean "we think the answer is no, this is not appropriate" (voting on Meta is confusing and works differently from the main SO site).
    – TylerH
    Commented Apr 5 at 14:15
  • 1
    Thanks for all of the quick feedback. For context, I live in a country with free healthcare so I often get services I don't directly pay for. When I leave the hospital I get an itemized bill for all my care. I see the total cost but I pay $0. It is nice to know exactly what my care cost the government and my taxes indirectly. It gives me pause next time I drive too fast. I wonder if people have any clue the effort that goes into SO. Commented Apr 5 at 16:22
  • 8
    The thing is, your bill doesn't look like that because the hospital wants you to feel like a lazy freeloader. It looks like that because the government wants you to feel like your country is a good place to live. The hospital is acting according to externally imposed regulation. There are also regulations here for writing answers, which are based on entirely different principles. We aren't trying to make people feel like the Internet saves (or costs, on the answer side) them money. We're trying to make them feel like they're sharing useful and interesting information and building a library. Commented Apr 5 at 17:44

3 Answers 3

29

No, that sounds like noise.

I can imagine you include a phrase like that took way longer than I anticipated with an explanation why that was so but I feel that is about maximum what you can get away with.

We know everyone is awesome that share their knowledge for free so many more visitors don't have to spend that time. That is worth way more than your hourly rate, time spend etc. And we thank you for that. Every day.

This answer took 6 to 8 minutes, salary rate between 6 and 8, total cost start at 6 but not more than 8.

1
  • 5
    You will receive payment of 6-8 internet points in 6-8 somethings.
    – TylerH
    Commented Apr 5 at 14:14
19

No. If a problem would take an excessive amount of work for us to answer, in most cases it indicates that the OP didn't scope their question reasonably, in which case the question should be closed as "needs more focus."

From the Don't Ask Page,

Your questions should be reasonably scoped. If you can imagine an entire book that answers your question, you’re asking too much.

Also relevant:

11

No, of course not. At best what you propose to add would be noise; at worst it could violate Code of Conduct.

Oops! I spent half a day on this. Normally I would charge 40*4=$160 for a solution like this

If I were asking a question for which I actually needed an answer, and saw something like this in the response, it would come across like you were scolding me or trying to make me feel guilty for the fact that you didn't get paid for the work. But it was not my choice to write the answer.

Sometimes a problem takes far longer than I expect, and... [I] overshare instead of quitting.

I want to address this claim first, and get to the bit about OCD in the next section.

I looked through several of your most recent answers, and it comes across that most of them are code-only or nearly so. Far from having an issue with "oversharing", I feel like they would benefit from more explanation - if they should exist at all (keep reading). While I have no doubt that a short block of code can legitimately take hours to write - time spent polishing the code as a pedagogical example - it does come across as though you are simply writing code to specification.

Stack Overflow is not a code-writing service. It is not for writing code to specification - and also not for adapting the technique shown in an existing Q&A to a specific situation, by the way. If you can answer the question that way, it is a duplicate and you should instead vote or flag to close it as a duplicate of the Q&A that you found.

...my Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder causes [difficulty with writing answers].... When I finally answer the question, I feel compelled to include the number of hours it took me, the level of expertise required, the average salary rate for such an expert, and the total cost if the work was contracted instead of accidentally given away for free.

If the source of this compulsion is purely due to a mental health issue, please carefully consider whether this is a serious barrier to participation here. Nobody here is particularly equipped to offer mental health assistance, nor can we make allowances for post content on the basis of any special needs of the author: questions and answers here are about the questions and answers, not their authors.

But in my completely unqualified lay opinion, the compulsion you describe sounds like a perfectly understandable result of ordinary human psychology, which might simply be exacerbated by pre-existing OCD. (Similarly for a feeling of determination to finish an answer despite expecting it to be of low value: ADHD exists, but so does sunk-cost fallacy.) So I will also address the point from that perspective:

Knowing how long you spent on something, or how much you would charge as a professional, does not help to understand the answer you have written. Since the goal here is to answer questions, not to fix each others' code, it's clearly not relevant. As such, including it creates the impression that you feel taken advantage of because you were not paid. If you feel this way, then please reconsider what questions you choose to answer. That feeling is a huge red flag for a question that does not meet standards and which should be closed rather than answered.

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .