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Previously on Meta (note: you are contractually obligated to read the preceding phrase in the tone of an American TV show narrator).

For context, the Community bot is a process whereby old questions with an un-accepted answer are pushed ("bumped") to the front page of Stack Overflow, to give those questions some extra visibility in the hope they'll finally be accept-answered. The intention behind this is noble, but ultimately futile for one or more of the below reasons:

  • The asker is a one-question-wonder, therefore unlikely to ever return to the site and accept an answer
  • The asker didn't bother accepting the answer then, and is unlikely to do so now
  • The question was on-topic for SO at the time it was asked, but no longer is
  • The question is extremely poor but has been upvote-brigaded, presumably by the asker's friends or colleagues, which is likely why it originally attracted an answer
  • The question is time-relevant, e.g. relating to a specific version of software that has now been superseded

A further downside is that such questions are likely to attract low-quality answers from new users.

I'm sure a few of you are going to correctly point out that some of the above points would be addressed by flagging these old questions for closure. But that requires curation effort that could be far more productively spent on a new question - as opposed to an old, dead one that was quietly and unobtrusively bit-rotting away until its corpse got pinned to the front page.

To quote from an answer on the above-linked Meta question, this pretty much sums up my attitude towards the bot's bumping behaviour and how useful it is:

I don't remember any case where I was glad the bot had bumped a question. It was always just a chore to deal with the question so it wouldn't get bumped again.

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    Does the Community user behave differently on SO than other sites? My understanding is that it won't bump questions that have at least one upvoted answer. That alone mitigates some of the concerns. If the question is good enough that it remains open and undeleted, then why does it not deserve a good answer? Commented Mar 22 at 12:27
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    @ThomasOwens it is the same on SO. From Catija's answer (who was an SO employee at the time) an answer is bumped if it is "not recently active, not closed, not deleted, score of >=0, no accepted answer, is answered, and the answer/s: are not deleted and have a max score = 0 (meaning at least one answer must have a score of zero but no answers may have a score >0)", emphasis mine. If any of these conditions is invalidated then the post is no longer bumped. So you can stop a post from being bumped by accepting an answer, but also by upvoting an answer or downvoting all answers.
    – Marijn
    Commented Mar 22 at 13:02
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    So the only issue remains when there are answers, they are all at 0, and you don't think any answer deserves an upvote but at the same time you don't think they all deserve a downvote, and the question is >0 (so you can't downvote it to <0 by yourself) or the question is at 0 but you think it does not deserve a downvote. This may happen but it seems a bit of an edge case. Conversely, especially in recent years, good answers are often not accepted and not upvoted at first, and bumping provides an opportunity to upvote them.
    – Marijn
    Commented Mar 22 at 13:12
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    There was a question on Ask Different for which I had provided two answers (more fool I), one using applescript, the other automator. The question/answer was bumped several times, seemingly every fixed number of days. The question had received one upvote, the answers no votes at all. Of course, it kept popping up in the 'current' questions when I visited the site. After perhaps four such bumps, I tried revising my answers but eventually had seen enough of the question and deleted the answers. The repeat-bumping is the irksome part.
    – Mockman
    Commented Mar 22 at 16:57
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    How often do questions get bumped, site-wide, nowadays? Commented Mar 22 at 18:19
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    I suppose that many of those close-worthy questions had narrow escapes because the close vote threshold was 5 in their day, rather than the current 3. (Sideways look at Super User.) Commented Mar 22 at 18:30
  • Also, close votes are algorithmically aged away. (I don't know that algorithm.) Commented Mar 22 at 18:55
  • @KarlKnechtel every 120 days according to Catija in a comment.
    – Marijn
    Commented Mar 23 at 6:43
  • @AndrewMorton if (views >= 100) { daysToAge = 4; } else { daysToAge = 14; } stackoverflow.com/help/privileges/close-questions
    – VLAZ
    Commented Mar 25 at 14:38
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    Does this answer your question? Should the Community bot stop bumping dead questions?
    – Lamper46
    Commented Mar 25 at 21:07

1 Answer 1

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The main purpose of the community bot bumping these questions is to attract the attention of curators who are too busy with new question to take care of the old questions. It has nothing to do with the question asker or having an accepted answer.

It still serves its purpose. It's meant to bring to our attention posts that could be good, but most likely need editing or closure instead. It's meant to be a chore.

If you can't see anything wrong with the question or its answers, feel free to upvote something. Usually a single downvote is what it needs to no longer be bumped. Treat it just like another review queue.

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    But it's not addressed to the ones dedicated to curation. It bumps in the questions field, which I suppose is mainly used by potential answerers. The curators will be on the review qeues and won't see these bumps. As an answerer which does my very little curation chores only as part of my attempt to answer, because I don't feel confident dealing with edge cases, these questions are 99% of the time a lost of time with no clear action to take. If you want the curators to see them, maybe bump them in the various review queues as a special category? Or give us an opt-out?
    – Kaiido
    Commented Mar 22 at 22:54
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    @Kaiido They can write a new better answer or upvote any of the existing ones. It's not useless
    – Dharman Mod
    Commented Mar 22 at 23:47
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    The incentives to write a new answer for an old post are relatively low, moreover when said question didn't receive any attentions lately. And once again, the real issue I have with these is that more than often they are in a grey area, like not clear enough to gather a simple answer, but not unclear enough to warrant a close vote either, you know, the kind of questions that with a few leading comments can become actual good questions, but when you come back to it a few days later wondering why your comment wasn't addressed, you notice the user didn't connect in the last decade.
    – Kaiido
    Commented Mar 23 at 0:24
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    Maybe marking them more clearly as being bumped could be a good compromise with lower dev efforts?
    – Kaiido
    Commented Mar 23 at 0:24
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    The curators will be on the review qeues - personally I prefer curating the front page, so the bumping is useful for me.
    – mkrieger1
    Commented Mar 23 at 8:34
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    Maybe marking them more clearly as being bumped - I second this, it always takes me a while to figure out why a question appeared, looking for edits first and finding none.
    – mkrieger1
    Commented Mar 23 at 8:36
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    @mkrieger1: I also prefer curating via a search on some tags sorted by "active", but I can't remember a case where an auto-bumped question was good enough to be worth the extra attention. But often not bad enough to deserve a downvote or close vote. In some cases I've held my nose and up or down voted a marginal answer (or sometimes the Q) so the bumping would stop, in others the answers weren't good enough to deserve even that, but the question seemed very specific so only the long-gone OP would benefit, or confused in their own unique way about a common topic so not quite a duplicate. Commented Mar 23 at 9:23
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    Perhaps after 2 cycles of being bumped without any changes (new answers or votes on answers), the Community auto-bump should ignore a question for further bumping. Commented Mar 23 at 9:25
  • @PeterCordes "I also prefer curating via a search...". That's your preference and may not be the same for everyone. I, for example, would search or look at the recently active questions depending on my mood. If one's really bothered by the bumps, they can look at the newest questions instead of recently active ones. Putting this aside, I like your suggestion about limiting the number of times a question gets bumped up if no changes occurred in the previous cycles.
    – M--
    Commented Mar 23 at 14:14
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    @PeterCordes Indeed. Posts getting bumped 10 times in a row without any modifications in between should qualify for Roomba before they qualify for another bump.
    – Mast
    Commented Mar 23 at 19:02
  • @M-- - I want to see new answers and edits in the tags I watch, so I can see when people mess them up and fix it. Like I said, curate, and also basically review. If I only wanted to see new questions, not even edits to questions, I'd sort by that instead. Commented Mar 23 at 21:17
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    @PeterCordes Or a middle ground: have an exponential backoff bumping frequency.
    – Passer By
    Commented Mar 24 at 9:05
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    @Mast Posts don't need to be Roomba'd if they doesn't actively hurt. Given that bumped posts haven't received downvotes and aren't closed, the only reason there's a problem is because they're getting bumped. IOW fix the bumping logic and the problem goes away.
    – Passer By
    Commented Mar 24 at 9:07
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    @PasserBy "For questions, if it no longer adds anything to the site, it should be deleted.", from the FAQ on deleted posts.
    – Mast
    Commented Mar 24 at 9:12
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    I'd actually like the ability to directly look at random unanswered questions where the asker still has some activity on the site (particularly questions with certain tags). And not just the stuff that received upvotes.
    – David A
    Commented Mar 24 at 22:56

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