41

I came across this question.

If you read the question carefully, you can see it is about a technically non-trivial situation in which somebody would like modify a string in JavaScript that contains HTML markup in such a way that the HTML, when rendered, would be rid of its leading and trailing parts that are visually empty. This includes whitespace characters, including those that exist as HTML entities like  , but also empty HTML tags and tags that only consist of such whitespace characters. This becomes obvious from the question title and from the OP's comments, such as this one:

So in my example, I finally should get the following after trimming: Trimming using JavaScript<br /><br /><br /><br />all leading and trailing white spaces

...and this one:

Will it remove white spaces like <br /> or <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <div>&nbsp;</div> ? Trmming simple spaces is not a problem. Its the white space removal that I am after.

However, it would appear that almost everybody reading or answering this question (or commenting on it, or commenting on answers with "thanks it worked for me", ...) didn't realize this and instead treated the question as simply "how to strip leading and trailing whitespace from a string using JavaScript".

Yes, the OP should have edited the question back then, instead of adding the clarifications only in comments. And yes, they are not using the term "whitespace" in an entirely correct way (or rather, they use "white spaces" in two words and mean something different from what we usually mean when we say "whitespace" as one word), but their examples make it clear what was meant. I'd fix that now for them, but that would make matters worse. The mess already exists.

The question itself has 210 upvotes and there are 8 non-deleted answers, two of which have a ton of upvotes (284 and 73, respectively). The problem is that of those 8 answers, only one answer seems to be written by someone who understood the actual question and attempts to answer it (although not entirely correctly either). Another answer misunderstood the question in a totally different way, and the other 6 answers instead answer the not-actually-asked question of how to strip actual whitespace from a JS string (unrelated to HTML).

This seems wrong. I feel like something should be done about it, but I'm not sure what's the right course of action. This similar meta question has answers saying that the incorrect answer should be commented on, to allow the poster to correct it, or just downvoted and a new answer posted. The problem here is, though, that almost everything in this question and its answers is somehow wrong, some answers are very highly upvoted so downvoting will do nothing, plus there is no good answer to this question at all (as in, I can't think of a good solution to the actual problem that was asked). It's not just one wrong answer that has upvotes, but the whole question thread is kinda... messed up.

In fact I think it would make most sense to turn everything on its head and edit the question to be the one that apparently everyone thought it was, so all the answers suddenly make sense. Then the question would actually be useful and warrant its popularity. But that also feels like a very wrong thing to do, even though the question is unclear as it is now, as "whitespace" is arguably not actually the right term here if it should include also HTML tags that surround the whitespace. Usually, such unclear questions don't even attract that many answers and upvotes, so we don't even have this problem, but in this case, it did.

Is there a recommended way of handling such a situation? Or do we just accept that oddballs like this exist and ignore them? I feel like there is a risk that the question is used as duplicate target for how to strip whitespace... just compounding the mess.

UPDATE: The OP has clarified their question now and even posted an answer!

18
  • 7
    I mean... the question you linked to is very much open to interpretation.
    – Kevin B
    Mar 13 at 21:54
  • 5
    Not if you include the clarifying comment the OP posted a few minutes later.
    – CherryDT
    Mar 13 at 21:57
  • 25
    comments aren't part of the question.
    – Kevin B
    Mar 13 at 21:57
  • 19
    It should have been though. The OP should have edited it in. In some other cases, somebody else would have edited it in for them, but that didn't happen here. Nonetheless, clearly this was the OP's intention. You can also see that from the title of the question which talks specifically about HTML strings. Given that it now has a lot of upvotes (both the Q and the As) I feel like it should be fixed, one way or another. I see such "fixes" happen to other popular questions as well, no?
    – CherryDT
    Mar 13 at 22:00
  • 6
    Have you downvoted, the answers that don't answer the question, because that is the only thing we can do as community users. Once those answers become eligible to be deleted, they could of course be deleted, That will not happen if users find them helpful. I would agree the comments are not part of the question. We cannot assume we understood the author's intent 6 years later. Mar 13 at 23:13
  • 4
    "This becomes obvious from the question title and from the OP's comments, such as this one:" The question should have been edited to include a proper specification based on this comment. It is probably still either unclear or not adequately focused. Mar 14 at 0:49
  • 5
    @SecurityHound rather than racing to downvote and answer, the approach would better be to analyze what relevant information does it add even though it may not 100% answer the original question. Either then answer has merit or it doesn't and by a knee-jerk reaction to jump on the downvote bandwagon is the wrong approach. There are many, many answers that do not 100% address every point of the posters question, yet still provide valuable information to community members -- as evidenced by the upvotes. That is why people come to SE sites. Mar 14 at 1:57
  • 1
    @DavidC.Rankin - It seems clear to me, perhaps I am not interpreting the author correctly, they don’t find the answers that don’t answer the author’s question to be helpful. Cherry was asking how to react to such a situation. My response is, downvote, answers that are unhelpful. Mar 14 at 2:05
  • There are shades of grey. My point being that there are probably 50%+ of answers that can be interpreted as not answering every point of a question, but still provide relevant information for the poster to use. The fact that several of the answers are 10+ or 100+ upvoted would seem to indicate they have some merit and simply applying a technical doesn't hit all points of the question, so downvote ignores that. There are other answers that are rightly downvoted. After nearly a decade on this site, many more fall into the first category, and the community takes care of downvotes for the rest. Mar 14 at 3:37
  • 1
    "Question with many answers" - actually it's a pretty moderate amount given the circumstances. Open-ended javascript question about DOM manipulation, there could have been 50 answers on that for every javascript technology in the world. I think one answer has an interesting titbit: "I know this is a very old question but it still doesn't have an accepted answer.". A nice window into the mind of those that pile on late pretty pointless answers. I can hardly fault that logic either, another victim of the pointlessly misleading acceptance feature.
    – Gimby
    Mar 14 at 8:40
  • 1
    @Gimby I assume the OP never accepted an answer because none of them actually do what he wants. OTOH, like so many OPs, he didn't realise that you're supposed to clarify questions by editing them, not by posting comments...
    – PM 2Ring
    Mar 14 at 8:48
  • 1
    Just passing by, so I didn’t read everything in details, but possible duplicate of meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/280340/… (and this one of mine)
    – Didier L
    Mar 14 at 14:46
  • @DidierL disappointing that my disappointing answer is still the only answer to yours.
    – Gimby
    Mar 14 at 16:45
  • 1
    @Sam Why are bots relevant here? The problems are due to old-fashioned human error.
    – PM 2Ring
    Mar 15 at 14:11
  • 1
    @SamGinrich Not sure what you mean; you don't really address the topic here, this Q&A has nothing to do with bots. You introduced that idea, and then didn't explain how bots are relevant. When asked to explain it, you talked about how it's hard for you to earn reputation. It sounds like maybe you should raise your concerns somewhere else.
    – TylerH
    Mar 15 at 20:02

5 Answers 5

15

The question is obviously very poor, and it's easy to interpret it as a duplicate of an already existing "how do I remove leading/trailing whitespace from a [not HTML] string."

Given that we do have in comments a clear intent from the author, and that the question the author was trying to ask is useful, the best approach is to edit the question to make the actual question clear. Yes, this should have been done long ago, but the other option is to leave open an unclear question that is (not entirely unreasonably) interpreted as a duplicate of (probably several) existing questions.

I don't have an opinion at this time about how to deal with the incorrect answers, but there's a possibility that those will fix themselves over time. If not, a moderator might consider deleting answers that are obviously incorrect.

If the above doesn't sound appetising, the only other option I can think of is to delete the question. (This might be justified on the basis that the original author made such as mess of it.)

Leaving things as they are seems to me the worst of all approaches; it risks better formulations of the question being tagged as duplicates and directed to this version which has so many highly-voted incorrect answers. Better to fix this sooner than later.

8
  • 5
    Normally, mods don't delete answers based on technical correctness. However, they can delete posts that don't attempt to answer the question as asked, or which answer a different question. So we have a tricky situation here. ;)
    – PM 2Ring
    Mar 14 at 3:50
  • 2
    @PM2Ring I don't know that it's all that tricky for the answers that are clearly answering a different question. That said, it probably is worth further discussion and thought about what to do with the answers once the question is corrected. I would say that correcting the question is by far a higher priority, as at least that stops things from getting worse, and gives the possibility that things will sort themselves out on their own.
    – cjs
    Mar 14 at 7:44
  • 5
    If we edit the question to make it clear what the OP actually wanted to do, we invalidate most of the answers. But if we edit it to make it match the answers better (eg, with a simpler input data string), then the edit conflicts with the author's intent. I see that the OP is still active. Perhaps he will visit this MSO question when he wonders why he just lost a bunch of rep on an old question...
    – PM 2Ring
    Mar 14 at 8:54
  • 3
    @PM2Ring Invalidating most of the answers seems fine to me; there are already a ton of answers on other questions to the question that's not what the OP meant. ¶ Remember, we should be looking at this in the context of all the questions on SO, not just in the context of this one individual question.
    – cjs
    Mar 14 at 9:53
  • 1
    One should also note the questions marked as duplicated of this one that don't actually fit the task asked. Also, holy crap, where were you with your rational approach about what can be done and having an actual list of things that we have tools to achieve.
    – Braiam
    Mar 14 at 20:29
  • 1
    @PM2Ring: Invalidating answers is generally bad... but answering incomplete questions is on the answerers. It's tempting. Especially in the race to be the first to answer. But ultimately answerers should take the time to understand what the OP wants; if their answer becomes off-topic because they didn't it's on them. Mar 16 at 14:44
  • 1
    @MatthieuM. "Should" takes a back seat when there is a system set up to reward certain behaviours which you classify as "should not". Mar 16 at 22:46
  • @user253751: Indeed, and I don't see any reason not to punish back seat drivers ;) Mar 17 at 12:20
11

It's a mess. :(

Yes, the OP (or somebody) should have edited those clarifying comments into the question body, but it's too late to do that now, since it would invalidate most of the existing answers.

Answers are supposed to answer the question stated in the question body. Answerers are not obliged to address information presented in the question comments; they are also free to ignore the question title. This is the standard policy on SO and across the network. Comments are second-class citizens, and may be deleted at any time without a trace (for non-mods). Also, trying to search for questions based on info in the comments is madness.

Now the OP's real question (how to remove all the leading and trailing components from an HTML fragment which are rendered as whitespace) is rather hard. To do that task properly, you need to parse the HTML (probably using the DOMParser.parseFromString() method) and then analyse the resulting DOM structure. That's a fairly complicated task, and it's probably too broad to address it adequately in a single SO answer.

OTOH, the apparent question, which most of the existing answers address (how to trim leading and trailing whitespace in JavaScript), is a mundane, trivial task. I haven't searched for duplicates for that particular task, but I expect that there are many. So even though most of those answers have scored a lot of points over the years, and the page has had 262k visits, IMHO this question and its answers don't really add much value to the site. It's a liability, not an asset.

Unfortunately, it has been used as a dupe target a few times, so we can't simply delete it. OTOH, it's only linked to 12 other questions, and there are surely other questions which are much better targets for the "how to trim whitespace" question.

My recommendation is to find a better dupe target for those questions and to delete this train wreck.

12
  • There is one answer that takes a stab at answering the question the OP meant to ask but didn't. Unfortunately using regexes on HTML, which is well known to not be robust or generally a good idea, but possibly has some future value. The user who posted it is still active so could potentially re-post it on a new Q&A if it's worth creating one, if anyone would find one... If they still endorse their HTML regex hack from 6 years ago. Mar 14 at 6:17
  • 2
    Ah, "train wreck" was the word I was looking for, thank you :)
    – CherryDT
    Mar 14 at 6:58
  • 2
    "Answerers are not obliged to address information presented in the question comments; they are also free to ignore the question title." I would not recommend to ignore the question title. It's part of the question. But then I would also not answer unclear questions. If I do and later it turns out that the question was meant differently, my fault. Mar 14 at 7:55
  • 1
    While you are correct that answers are supposed to address the question posted, and can ignore the title and comments, that question itself is open to interpretation. But when you consider that the question was not closed as a duplicate for having been asked and answered multiple times in the 500 earlier questions about trimming strings in JS, the expected interpretation becomes clear.
    – cjs
    Mar 14 at 7:56
  • 5
    That said, your suggestion to "find a better dupe target for those questions and to delete this train wreck" sounds to me like a reasonable approach to consider.
    – cjs
    Mar 14 at 7:57
  • 6
    That should be a close reason. "It's a mess". But I guess historic lock actually serves that function.
    – Gimby
    Mar 14 at 8:33
  • @NoDataDump I agree that we shouldn't ignore the title. But the question body has priority, and if there's a conflict, the title should be edited to reflect the body (not vice versa). OTOH, search engines give high priority to titles, and it's a Good Idea for answerers & curators to fix them when necessary. Sadly, it's not uncommon to see bad titles on popular questions, even on the HNQ.
    – PM 2Ring
    Mar 14 at 8:43
  • "it has been used as a dupe target a few times, so we can't simply delete it" actually we can, it would take more delete votes in general, yes, but we can achieve that. It isn't like people are lacking delete votes to use.
    – Braiam
    Mar 14 at 20:27
  • 1
    @Braiam no, delete votes can't be cast on a question if other questions are closed as a duplicate of it. I know, because I've tried it and gotten the error message on many other questions in the past. This is a separate system check. Those duplicates need to be redirected (or even reopened) first. Then this question could be deleted if it gets closed again and then gets enough delete votes. Mar 14 at 21:40
  • 3
    OP has now gone and edited their question half a dozen times today. I don't have the energy to look whether any of them invalidate existing answers, but it sounds like they might.
    – TylerH
    Mar 15 at 14:32
  • @TylerH this revision by another user already invalidated them. Mar 15 at 16:58
  • @KarlKnechtel you seem to have misread: we can delete those questions as long as we delete those that are marked as duplicate first. In essence, we, users, can solve this by ourselves, at the expenses of using more votes. Instead of using 1 vote on the question, we would use 1+N for each question that is marked as duplicate of that one (not just linked).
    – Braiam
    Mar 16 at 9:04
1

Is there a recommended way of handling such a situation? Or do we just accept that oddballs like this exist and ignore them? I feel like there is a risk that the question is used as duplicate target for how to strip whitespace... just compounding the mess.

It is opinion based. Possible ways to handle such questions include:

  • Look at the accepted answer to figure out what the OP wanted, then re-phrase the question to match.

  • If there is no accepted answer then sift through comments made by OP and others. Re-phrase the question accordingly.

  • If there are too many "wrong" answers with lots of upvotes the re-phrase the question to match the answer.

Personally I don't like the last option but it is what it is. For example, What is the best way to check for an empty string in Javascript — a very specific question not requiring more than a one line answer — ended up becoming How do I check for an empty/undefined/null string in JavaScript because that is how StackOverflow works.

2
  • "because that is how StackOverflow works" -> 2 pages of answers. My lord. In this case though, I can be a little more lenient towards the hoarding behaviour. This is also how Javascript works :)
    – Gimby
    Mar 15 at 10:24
  • Probably the JS question is the opposite: how to check that I have any data on my object, rather than asking how to check that I don't have any data.
    – Braiam
    Mar 16 at 9:08
1

This is ... not great. Reading the comments the question was always about html tags in the string. Therefore the answers have always been wrong and there was nothing to invalidate.

Now OP has fixed his question, answered his own question, got a downvote on the answer for his trouble, and deleted his answer.

It's clear that all of the dupe targets leading into it need to be retargeted. One of the other linked (non-dupe) questions is essentially a duplicate with a different language tag so somebody actually got the original question. However, it has a single answer, and it's wrong.

I don't know what to do with all the wrong answers though. A +200 wrong answer is hard to do anything about. It almost wants editing the answer into the question; that is deliberately setting aside the rule because of the hot mess; but only OP should do that.

2
  • Now the OP undid all the clarifications in their question. They were an improvement though! Perhaps we should roll them back under the no-vandalism rule? Or maybe we should be happy about it being closed as missing details... And fix those dupe targets.
    – CherryDT
    Mar 16 at 7:24
  • @CherryDT: lol race condition; he rolled back before I viewed it and I still thought the question was clear. So I have never actually seen the improved version.
    – Joshua
    Mar 16 at 14:59
1
  • I mean... the question you linked to is very much open to interpretation. – Kevin B 2 days ago
  • Not if you include the clarifying comment the OP posted a few minutes later. – CherryDT 2 days ago

Ask yourself one simple question:

How does it matter after TWELVE(!) years?

I simply unable to understand, how it's even possible to treat a decade old popular question as though it was asked 2 minutes ago in a private conversation. Why should anyone consider such insignificant details after the OP is long gone? What could be possible logic behind that?

You must realize that it isn't the OP, whom you're answering now. It's people coming from Google. Lured by the question title, whatever it is.

A popular question is what people take it for. Period.

For any question asked more than, say, a month ago, it is no more a personal plea for help. It's a community asset. And you should treat it as such. What you should do is to edit the question, removing this irrelevant stuff and making it match the answers. That's it.

11
  • 2
    Except that the OP is not long gone. He's still active on the site, and has made numerous edits to the question in response to this MSO discussion.
    – PM 2Ring
    Mar 16 at 8:03
  • 3
    So what? I am genuinely puzzled, how does it matter either - whether they are active or not. It is not the OP who is discussed here but the question. The fact that two hundred thousand people from Google a bit overweigh whatever intentions some dude had twelve years ago, no matter whether they are still active or not? No? Mar 16 at 8:22
  • 3
    People of here are so accustomed to doublethink (SO is a library of answers, yet each question should be treated as though it's a personal help desk) that they don't even realize the essential controversy of this approach. Mar 16 at 8:26
  • They don't even realize the irony of the fact, that the only reason the OP edited their post is the hype. While millions of less fortunate questions remain mutual exclusive garbage. Mar 16 at 8:28
  • Oh, I agree that the vast number of visitors to that page far outweigh the OP. And that the question has, de facto, become about simple trimming of whitespace from a JS string, not the complex task the OP wanted to ask about. But in that case, it's not a useful question about whitespace trimming, which is why I recommended deleting it. OTOH, we can't stop the OP from continuing to edit it, and he doesn't appear to be interested in joining this MSO conversation. ;)
    – PM 2Ring
    Mar 16 at 8:33
  • Well, I suppose it could be locked, at least until we come to some consensus.
    – PM 2Ring
    Mar 16 at 8:38
  • Yes, deleting (or closing as a dupe) is also an option. But the point is, clarifying the question and adding a new answer (which was suggested here on Meta) is not an option. As it will render existing answers a nonsense. Which is the point of my answer here, but it seems it's too complex to comprehend. Mar 16 at 8:42
  • Several of us have already stated that it's far too late to clarify the question to make it conform to the OP's actual intention. There's the option of editing to make it conform better to the existing answers, but doing such edits that conflict with the OP's intention is pretty controversial.
    – PM 2Ring
    Mar 16 at 8:47
  • 1
    Yes, that "OP's intention" is one of the things that make Stack Overflow so ridiculous a place. One would think, how could it possibly matter for the library of quality answers? But in reality personal help desk always takes a precedence. Mar 16 at 8:51
  • 1
    Yes, the "OP's intention" policy does have its problems. However, we do want OPs to have some sense of ownership over their questions and answers. Without it, post quality suffers, as was seen in the early days when "community wiki" posts were more common.
    – PM 2Ring
    Mar 16 at 9:01
  • Today is not the "early days". The iceberg has turned upside down long time ago. It is not AS MANY QUESTIONS AS POSSIBLE!!! greedy policy should be applied. But "as quality answers as possible". But the system is so retarded to be changed or even to realize the ridiculous mutual exclusivity of its policies. Mar 16 at 9:05

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