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Markdown formatting normally relies on indentations. However, I was having copy-pasting issues with the markdown text between Stack Overflow and Google Docs. I had to do it because Stack Overflow drafts auto-save was not reliable. So I decided to copy the HTML code of the rendered markdown from Stack Overflow instead, because HTML is (ideally) completely supported in markdown and does not rely on indentations at all.

This went well until I was ready to post the answer on Stack Overflow, and then I got an error saying unformatted code. Unfortunately, I didn't take a screenshot at the time, but here's the same error text I found on other people's posts:

Your post appears to contain code that is not properly formatted as code. Please indent all code by 4 spaces using the code toolbar button or the CTRL+K keyboard shortcut. For more editing help, click the [?] toolbar icon.

I now posted that answer by manually rewriting it as markdown. And I can't attempt to replicate it now because it would be bad if I post the same answer again in the name of testing.

Here is my markdown:

<h3>My hypotheses:</h3>
<p>We know that Dart creates different constructors for creating const and non-const objects (even constructors marked as const internally have a non-const copy). The compiler could’ve been made to create a const constructor on its own when it encounters a const object creation, but this leads to redundancy (both time and memory wise) because of issues pertaining code segment memory allocation to the class and pre-compiled header files. So it is better for the class itself to mark the constructor as a const constructor, and hence the rule 1.</p>
<p>Restrictions on modifying attributes, is handled in the form of removing their setter methods. Methods are common for the class, and can not be separated between const and non-const objects without creating different versions of the class. Although, this is likely possible for the compiler to implement internally, Dart perhaps chose the simple approach of leveraging existing mechanisms, which results in rule 2. Because a final attribute does not have a setter method, whether the class has a const constructor or not.</p>
<p>For rule 3,
There are two reasons why we might want to have a body for a constructor:</p>
<ol>
<li>Calculating the values of the attributes from the parameters before setting them. But to assign the calculated values to the attribute of the object being created, the setter function has to exist. But it doesn’t for final attributes. So this use case can not be applied.</li>
<li>Creating side effects: But since the const object is created at compile time, what side effects are we expecting that we can’t hardcode ourselves? Besides, it restricts the compiler on the sequence of passes it makes and the way it compiles codes. And coders may also have wrong expectations of the flow of execution of the various const object creations with respect to each other and the rest of the code. So this use case is not to be applied either.</li>
</ol>
<p>When neither of the use cases is applied (and both cases require additional work to implement, as normally in languages the constructor body is executed after creating the object), why even allow a body? If at all, we need something to be run from the object, we can do it at runtime with class methods (not the constructor)</p>
</div>

The text I showed is the answer I wanted to post. It's literally the content of the answer. It is not supposed to be rendered as a code block (the way it is shown in this question).

This is how I want it look in the end:

enter image description here

Problem faced

Let me show you what happens when you try to play with markdown in Stack Overflow and Google Docs.

Browser: Microsoft Edge - Version 122.0.2365.80 (Official build) (64-bit)

Case 1: Stack Overflow to Google Docs

Stack Overflow:

enter image description here

Google Docs:

enter image description here

Case 2: Google Docs to Stack Overflow

Google Docs:

enter image description here

Stack Overflow:

enter image description here

The question

Is there a way, perhaps via another tag, to tell Stack Overflow explicitly that this is markdown text and not unformatted HTML code?

If your answer is "Don't use HTML", please also suggest alternatives to properly copying markdown text away from and into Stack Exchange, or properly storing drafts within Stack Exchange

Windows Notepad worked without causing issues (but has no rendering engine). I also tried Stack Edit, but that caused issues with copy-pasting too. I will probably have to hunt for a desktop editor

The restriction seems to be enforced only on Stack Overflow. I was able to post the same code in Meta Stack Overflow without getting restricted

This further justifies my stance that this is a bug. It is not a behaviour that was intentional to force true markdown in place of HTML. It is just that the check system thinks I unintentionally neglected to format what it thinks is a code block

19
  • 17
    I seem to be missing something here. What you show is unformattated HTML code, not markdown, even if a markdown engine would just literally add it to HTML output. Commented Mar 12 at 15:35
  • @MisterMiyagi Perhaps I misunderstood the term "markdown" then. By markdown, I meant anything that can rendered by a markdown engine, even if it just adds it to the HTML output, like you said. The text I showed is the answer I wanted to post. It's literally the content of the answer. It is not supposed to be rendered as a code block. You can take a look at the answer directly Commented Mar 12 at 15:40
  • 14
    Using HTML like that isn't recommended, and only a limited set of HTML tags are supported. See What HTML tags are allowed on Stack Exchange sites?. BTW, you have an unbalanced </div> tag.
    – PM 2Ring
    Commented Mar 12 at 15:51
  • 8
    But the engine is correct, it's seen code (HTML) and it's not in a code block, and so flagged it, @AndhavarapuBalu . The correct way to format content in posts/comments is with markdown. The only time I use HTML is when there isn't a markdown equivalent (on Stack Overflow), such as <strike>, <sup>.
    – Thom A
    Commented Mar 12 at 15:52
  • @ThomA I understood the intention of the check system. But the system is no longer correct when it forces me to put something in a code block that isn't supposed to be code Commented Mar 12 at 16:06
  • 5
    Maybe Google Docs is not the right tool for the job? You tried to solve one problem, but created couple of new ones in the process.
    – Dan Mašek
    Commented Mar 12 at 16:07
  • Does it work when you remove the invalid </div> that's at the end of the text you show as wanting to post?
    – Makyen Mod
    Commented Mar 12 at 16:31
  • 5
    That it isn't supposed to be in a code block doesn't change anything, @AndhavarapuBalu . Don't use (HTML) code to format the entirety of your posts, and you can't get the error. The system can't look at your (HTML) code and think "Oh, yeah, that's clearly written like an answer, not a solution, so I'll allow it."
    – Thom A
    Commented Mar 12 at 16:32
  • @ThomA I understand that the current system does not allow it. That's why I call it a bug. But my question was about perhaps there being a way to tell the system your intentions explicitly. To bypass the restriction for HTML codes in specific. Like maybe a wrapper tag like "<md>" Commented Mar 12 at 16:39
  • 11
    "Because HTML is (ideally) completely supported in markdown" not really, no. One of the ideas behind using markdown for posts (other than due to the ease) is because users should not have all the capabilities HTML would provide them with. That would be a big security issue. Commented Mar 12 at 16:42
  • 2
    "I decided to copy the HTML code of the rendered markdown from Stack Overflow instead." getting the markdown of a post is much more intuitive (as a user) compared to this, why didn't you do that? Commented Mar 12 at 16:47
  • @AbdulAzizBarkat It didn't work. I've now attached screenshots Commented Mar 12 at 17:00
  • 13
    Looks like you're mixing google docs list markup with actual markdown list markup... If you want to use an external tool, use one that either doesn't format your text, or one that supports markdown. Google Docs is neither.
    – Cerbrus
    Commented Mar 12 at 17:04
  • 6
    on Meta we don't have the same check because we want be able to assist users that come here with their exact markdown that doesn't work on main. It would be extremely hard to diagnose if meta had the same checks in place. it is relaxed by design here.
    – rene
    Commented Mar 12 at 17:32
  • 2
    "That's why I call it a bug." So, to confirm, the "bug" is that the system is unable to discern HTML that is to format a post from HTML that is a solution to the question when the entirity of the content is HTML? Well, I wouldn't call that a "bug", the site just isn't that intelligent; you likely would need AI for that.
    – Thom A
    Commented Mar 12 at 17:52

1 Answer 1

11

Is there a way, perhaps via another tag, to tell Stack Overflow explicitly that this is markdown text and not unformatted HTML code?

When you post on Stack Overflow, the post is interpreted as Markdown. Full stop.

HTML tags are an extension to Markdown. All the way back to the beginning with a proposed standard on Daring Fireball, Markdown has conceived of HTML this way:

Markdown is not a replacement for HTML, or even close to it. Its syntax is very small, corresponding only to a very small subset of HTML tags. The idea is not to create a syntax that makes it easier to insert HTML tags. In my opinion, HTML tags are already easy to insert. The idea for Markdown is to make it easy to read, write, and edit prose. HTML is a publishing format; Markdown is a writing format. Thus, Markdown’s formatting syntax only addresses issues that can be conveyed in plain text.

For any markup that is not covered by Markdown’s syntax, you simply use HTML itself. There’s no need to preface it or delimit it to indicate that you’re switching from Markdown to HTML; you just use the tags.

The only restrictions are that block-level HTML elements — e.g. <div>, <table>, <pre>, <p>, etc. — must be separated from surrounding content by blank lines, and the start and end tags of the block should not be indented with tabs or spaces. Markdown is smart enough not to add extra (unwanted) <p> tags around HTML block-level tags.


This went well until I was ready to post the answer on Stack Overflow, and then I got an error saying unformatted code.

Excessive use of HTML tags makes the post look "like code" to a separate filtering algorithm. The site judges that you have just pasted in some code without attempting to take advantage of Markdown to format it. Of course, all text is valid Markdown input - it just sometimes produces a complete mess. The filter is just trying to catch mistakes.

But using actual Markdown-specific functionality for your post is easier anyway, and everything you show can be done with that functionality, and doesn't require HTML tags. So I can't understand the insistence on raw HTML. Just use Markdown features for this:

### My hypotheses:

We know that Dart creates different constructors for creating const and non-const objects (even constructors marked as const internally have a non-const copy). The compiler could’ve been made to create a const constructor on its own when it encounters a const object creation, but this leads to redundancy (both time and memory wise) because of issues pertaining code segment memory allocation to the class and pre-compiled header files. So it is better for the class itself to mark the constructor as a const constructor, and hence the rule 1.

Restrictions on modifying attributes, is handled in the form of removing their setter methods. Methods are common for the class, and can not be separated between const and non-const objects without creating different versions of the class. Although, this is likely possible for the compiler to implement internally, Dart perhaps chose the simple approach of leveraging existing mechanisms, which results in rule 2. Because a final attribute does not have a setter method, whether the class has a const constructor or not.

For rule 3, There are two reasons why we might want to have a body for a constructor:

* Calculating the values of the attributes from the parameters before setting them. But to assign the calculated values to the attribute of the object being created, the setter function has to exist. But it doesn’t for final attributes. So this use case can not be applied.

* Creating side effects: But since the const object is created at compile time, what side effects are we expecting that we can’t hardcode ourselves? Besides, it restricts the compiler on the sequence of passes it makes and the way it compiles codes. And coders may also have wrong expectations of the flow of execution of the various const object creations with respect to each other and the rest of the code. So this use case is not to be applied either.

When neither of the use cases is applied (and both cases require additional work to implement, as normally in languages the constructor body is executed after creating the object), why even allow a body? If at all, we need something to be run from the object, we can do it at runtime with class methods (not the constructor)

Use HTML when it's needed to do something that Markdown syntax can't do.

Keep in mind that the site also makes some attempts to sanitize whatever HTML is provided, just so that you don't completely redesign the page or something like that. Your proposed content has an unmatched </div> tag, which seems problematic.


If your answer is "Don't use HTML", please also suggest alternatives to properly copying markdown text away from and into Stack Exchange, or properly storing drafts within Stack Exchange

Stack Exchange isn't meant to "store" anything for you. It remembers a draft so you don't lose it if your browser crashes. There is no question of "properly" storing it, because it just remembers what you typed in.

If copying and pasting Markdown text from Stack Overflow into another site doesn't do what you expect, or if copying Markdown text from another site doesn't give you the text you expect, that's a tech support issue for the other site. Stack Overflow doesn't transform anything that you paste into the post submission form.

Google Docs offers a word processor, not a Markdown editor; there is no reason to expect that pasting Markdown into it would produce formatted text, or that copying formatted text out of it would produce Markdown - just like there would be no reason to expect these things if you used Microsoft Word, LibreOffice, etc. If Google Docs supports some kind of copy/paste "as HTML", that's neither here nor there.

If you want a Markdown editor, neither here nor the main site is the right place to ask for recommendations. Try https://softwarerecs.stackexchange.com.


This further justifies my stance that this is a bug. It is not a behaviour that was intentional to force true markdown in place of HTML. It is just that the check system thinks I unintentionally neglected to format what it thinks is a code block

Yes, it "thinks" this by design. It is very much not a bug.

People come to Stack Overflow all the time and paste in some code and make no effort to check how it will appear after hitting the post button. A lot of the time they don't even attempt to ask a question.

For our purposes, HTML is "code", and it is perfectly allowed that someone could be trying to ask a question about why some HTML isn't rendering as expected. If someone just pastes a ton of HTML into the form, there's no way the system could know that this isn't the intent. It has no way to know that you don't want the post to show <h3>, etc. literally, because many people who would post the same thing, actually do want exactly that.

The system is in place exactly to prevent this situation. That's also why you only see it on the Stack Overflow main site: because people don't try this on Meta, or on other SE sites.

2
  • "There is no question of "properly" storing it, because it just remembers what you typed in." I lost half my draft in between because of some sort of cache mismatch between tabs Commented Mar 13 at 0:51
  • (Unable to suggest edits on meta) Summary: There is no syntax to achieve what the OP asked. Nor is it in the interests of Stack Overflow, as markdown was created for readability and ease of editing by others in the community Commented Mar 13 at 3:38

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