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I have been on this site for a couple of days and brought with me a personal puzzle problem. I had people who totally understood this question and provided some answers.

On the other hand, specific two people have made comments about the clarity of the question, but they were not able to emphatically say why or what was unclear.

As a new user, I think this was quite aggressive and unpleasant.

I was willing to provide all information needed to clarify.

In short, I think it's not enough for anyone of higher points to just say a question is not clear. I'm sure anyone can do this. The true distinction is the ability to nonaggressively and clearly point out what exactly is wrong. If not, how do we tell a person claiming a question is not clear is doing so out of personal reasons rather than constructive criticisms?

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    Re "how do we tell a person claiming a question is not clear is doing so out of personal reasons": You can not know another person's motives. Nothing good comes out of speculating about it. Instead, assume good intent. Mar 1 at 7:46
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    FYI, synthetic puzzles will not generally be well received. The site is meant as a Q&A for practical programming issues. While there can be some overlap between a "puzzle" and a "practical issue", we prefer questions being based on real problems or situations, for which the answer can help future users. Solving puzzles help only the person solving the puzzle, but it's not generally a useful thing to read for future users.
    – yivi
    Mar 1 at 7:54
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    It's unlikely the question would have been posed like this if it was a real problem. You'll find that when you are working on a real situation, the whole problem statement and research change completely. In the unlikely case one still posted this as a "real problem needing a solution", it would still be a very poorly researched question (which could have lead to downvotes), but that's a different thing.
    – yivi
    Mar 1 at 8:05
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    You are now branching into a different topic: downvotes do not require comments, that's something that has been discussed to the boringly long extents and the result is always the same. Users use their votes to cast their opinion about posts. If one receives one or more downvotes, one should assume someone found the post either unclear, poorly researched, or simply not useful. One should take that into consideration and try to improve the post if possible.
    – yivi
    Mar 1 at 8:13
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    @user23463397 The site is meant for users who look for solutions. I have a problem, I search for a solution, which exists because someone else had a similar problem in the past, and got an answer with a similarly applicable solution. Puzzles, do not generally help grow a corpus of solutions to practical problems. I do not intend to discuss this anymore, I was just giving you feedback and advice so you were more successful in your future SO interactions. Use it, or not. It's up to you.
    – yivi
    Mar 1 at 8:15
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    I look at that post you link and it doesn't read like a question. It reads like a homework assignment; one you've set the users of Stack Overflow to complete. In the entirety of the post (Question) you don't actually ask any questions. You don't explain the difficulty you are having solving the puzzle you've created, or what about your attempts aren't working (and what they are). It might seem like a silly thing to state, but part of posting a question means asking a question.
    – Thom A
    Mar 1 at 8:32
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    "Synthetic programming puzzle to solve with the community." - We don't do that here. "If puzzles are not meant to be well received, can we make that clear in policy ?" It is already abundantly clear in policy - questions need to be practical. You could also try looking at existing, recent, well-received questions to get some idea about what is considered appropriate. Mar 1 at 8:32
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    A puzzle isn't a question, @user23463397 .
    – Thom A
    Mar 1 at 8:46
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    @user23463397 "that sounds like synthetic programming questions are not forbidden *" you're just cherry-picking whatever you think supports your point. The "*a specific programming problem, or a software algorithm, or software tools commonly used by programmers; and is a practical, answerable problem that is unique to software development" is the relevant part for what is on-topic. Not how somebody feels about code. I write code and I love it (well, some times). Does that mean it's not forbidden for me to ask a cooking question? Or is that a complete non-sequitur?
    – VLAZ
    Mar 1 at 8:50
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    @user23463397 ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ You've been told what the site is about and where to look for what is or isn't on-topic. We can only warn you not to ask cooking questions because you love writing code. But we can't stop you from doing it.
    – VLAZ
    Mar 1 at 9:00
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    Your experience with this question has nothing to do with you being a new user, though. If I had posted that question, I'd have gotten the same treatment. Maybe even harsher, considering I should know better.
    – Cerbrus
    Mar 1 at 9:19
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    Buddy, please listen to what experienced users are telling you, here. We're trying to help you. It doesn't help if you just stubbornly revert edits.
    – Cerbrus
    Mar 1 at 9:23
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    When reading links about how to ask a good question and what's on-topic on Stack Overflow it should become clear that the word "problem" is not used as "puzzle" or "challenge", but as "difficulty". Also the question template makes that very clear ("Describe what you tried and what you expected to happen." i.e. you're dealing with something you didn't expect and don't know how to solve it). If you insist that "problem" = "puzzle" you're just playing a semantic game. You had a puzzle, not a problem. Mar 1 at 9:24
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    So that last paragraph about abuse of power in downvotes and closevotes isn't a thing then?
    – Cerbrus
    Mar 1 at 9:40

1 Answer 1

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Rather than focus on the post you link to, I'm going to focus on the point you make in your question here. Comments have been made both on the question here, and your "question" on main about why that post isn't on topic.

On the other hand, specific two people have made comments of clarity, but they were not able to emphatically say why or what. ... I think this was quite aggressive and unpleasant.

Saying that someone is aggressive is a very strong statement. If someone truly was aggressive towards you, then you should be using the flags feature to bring such content to the attention of the mods. For comments there is a little flag icon to the left of the comment you can click; click that and then select "It's unfriendly or unkind." In the post you link, however, I see nothing that would come close to requiring this kind of flag.

Being emphatic to a user is something you shouldn't really expect; Stack Overflow isn't some kind of service or help desk where users will want to feel your frustrations and help you work through your feelings on the matter, as well as the problem. The site is for specific programming questions and solutions to those questions. We don't like "noise" in our content, like "Hi", "thanks for your help", "How are you today", etc; posts should get straight to the point and describe the problem in detail, explain the difficulty you (the asker) is having solving that problem, and ask a question.

I was willing to provide all information needed to clarify.

In the post, you don't provide any information on what difficulty you are having. As I stated in the comments, the post reads like a homework assignment, not a question. If you attempted to solve the puzzle and failed, and want to ask about why your solution failed, great! Don't, however, just post an assignment and expect others to do it (for you); that isn't how the site works.

I think it's not enough for anyone of higher points to just say a question is not clear.

Contrary to your opinion, this is how the site works. Reputation is seen as a way for users to demonstrate that they understand the site, and so that comes with privileges. There are always outliers, where posts are closed incorrectly, or people who don't use their privileges often and so when they do they use them for reasons they weren't intended, but this is a very small percentage.

The true distinction is the ability to nonaggressively and clearly point out what exactly is wrong

This is what the closure reason is for. It tells you why the post was closed, and links to the help centre to an article that covers the likely reasons why your question is closed. There's no aggression there. Users may wish to comment on the why, but unfortunately many don't due to the actions of others; "revenge votes" are a big contribution to why these users don't comment.

how do we tell a person claiming a question is not clear is doing so out of personal reasons rather than constructive criticisms?

Again, I see nothing personal about the comments made on the post. The comments are about the content, many expressing the problems we have raised here, such as that it isn't a question, and you didn't describe the problem you are having solving your "puzzle".

I think we need a review of the power of downvotes, closure and how people use them. We must make sure it's not abused. I wish to know what or how this community handle such issues.

Well, you're in the right place; Meta is where we discuss such issues. For asking about a question you've posted, ask a well-voiced question with the tag; be prepared to invoke the Meta Effect.

For ideas about votes, this too is the right place, however, this has been discussed many, many, many times, so you must do research on those posts beforehand, and bring a new, interesting, well-researched discussion. If you don't do that, your post will most certainly be closed as a duplicate and likely be very poorly received.

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    thank you for your detailed response. For clarity I will respond by points: "Saying that someone is aggressive is a very strong statement. If someone truly was aggressive by threatening you, ......" First I did not say they someone is aggressive by threatening me. And the definition of aggressive is not only to do with threat. Please lookup a term called "passive-aggression". So I did not make this up or use the word wrongfully as your answer implied Mar 1 at 9:41
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    "For comments there is a little flag icon to the left of the comment you can click; click that and then select "It's unfriendly of unkind." In the post you link, however, I see nothing that would come close to requiring this kind of flag." I hope that you encountered same, then once you know what exactly my experience was, you could be in a better position to judge whether or not your experience require some unkind or unfriendly flag. Mar 1 at 9:43
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    @user23463397 if you meant "passive-aggressive" instead of "aggressive", please fix your question. They're different words.
    – Cerbrus
    Mar 1 at 9:43
  • Apologies, I misrecalled that flags were accessible to everyone, @user23463397 ; they are actually accessible at 15 reputation.
    – Thom A
    Mar 1 at 9:46
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    One can be aggressive without threats. We can see examples of that all day long in meta. There is plenty to pick on in the question without putting things in the OPs mouth. They never claimed anyone was "threatening" them.
    – yivi
    Mar 1 at 9:47
  • "Being emphatic to a user is something you shouldn't really expect; Stack Overflow isn't some kind of service or help desk where users will want to feel your frustrations and help you work through your feelings on the matter, as well as the problem." I think a fundamental principle of criticizing anything is letter the person know why. Otherwise on what basis will the user make the expected change ? Its like saying something is bad but you have refused to share a clear reason why. Mar 1 at 9:48
  • Personally, @yivi, if someone is aggressive towards me, I find that to be threatening behaviour.
    – Thom A
    Mar 1 at 9:52
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    Your last 3 comments aren't exactly free from passive aggression either, @user23463397: link/ss link/ss link/ss
    – Cerbrus
    Mar 1 at 9:55
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    So if someone insults you or belittles you, you would feel "threatened"? Or you mean that you wouldn't find those behaviors "aggressive"? Sorry, not buying it. I think you are playing a "word definition" game. And frankly, it's unnecessary. There is a lot that's right with your answer, and there is plenty that's wrong with the OP's premises. No need to lower to that. Bye.
    – yivi
    Mar 1 at 9:57
  • " I was willing to provide all information needed to clarify. 'In the post, you don't provide any information on what difficulty you are having'. "; I think @ThomA you may have slightly misunderstood my point on 'willing to provide all information'. e.g user asked a question which I explained (refer to post comments). He then replied in a way I found defensive. Scenario 2, another user (the second one, Ctrlz) said an answer was wrong, yet he refused to say exactly what makes it wrong. Pls check all these in the comments. That's what I meant by "I was willing tp provide all info...." Mar 1 at 9:57
  • "So if someone insults you or belittles you, you would feel "threatened"" I wouldn't find that aggressive or threathening behaviour, @yivi .
    – Thom A
    Mar 1 at 9:59
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    Emphatically means "forcefully or with emphasis"; Do y'all mean "empathetically", i.e. "in a way that shows you understand how somebody else feels because you can imagine what it would be like to be that person"?
    – ColleenV
    Mar 1 at 16:40
  • @ColleenV Emphatically as in with emphasis is what I meant. That is they claimed there was something wrong, but they would refuse to point exactly or emphasis on what exactly this problem is. They simply beat about the bush. Mar 4 at 7:51
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    @user23463397 In that case, you are probably looking for "explicitly" or in an explicit manner : clearly and without any vagueness or ambiguity I feel like this answer misinterpreted your usage though.
    – ColleenV
    Mar 4 at 15:04

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