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The other day, I spend several hours to explore a certain aspect of Spring Security and post a high-quality self-answered question. I believe I achieved my goal: the answer is detailed and thorough. In return, both my question and my answer were downvoted, and I had my asking privileges revoked. What's more, the question was closed with a far-fetched reason, it allegedly "needs to be more focused". Even though, the question was very clear and the key parts was even hightlighted in bold, "How do I visit endpoints in a Spring Security app with no explicit config?"

So I wonder, is there any mechanism at all to discipline moderators who abuse their authority? If so, how can I initiate such a process? I realize SO is not a country so it doesn't really have a tiered "court" system, however I hope there's a chance it still provides some ways to appeal and defend yourself against injustice. Thank you

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    No mods have interacted with that question, only "normal" users.
    – Thom A
    Commented Feb 18 at 13:06
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    And by what means have you determined that anyone involved with the closure of your question was "unscrupulous"? This would take considerable mind-reading power. Commented Feb 18 at 13:07
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    Instead of this rant you could have come to Meta and queried/argued against the closure of the question erm, at question. That is the "court" you are looking for. Instead you came to court and argued the court did not exist and called the judges biased.
    – Paulie_D
    Commented Feb 18 at 13:13
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    It's very strong assumption that people who interacted with your question were wrong. It takes 3 users to close a question, so that put them in the majority right now.
    – Dharman Mod
    Commented Feb 18 at 13:14
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    The very long answer suggests that the question is more likely too broad. It should probably be more focused.
    – Dharman Mod
    Commented Feb 18 at 13:16
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    Just to answer the titular question: you can raise an abuse of privilege as an issue via moderator flag. If the abuse is by a mod, you should fill out the contact us form. But of course, you must first understand which users are mods. They are the ones with a diamond beside their name.
    – Dharman Mod
    Commented Feb 18 at 13:18
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    I agree that the question is indeed focused, it can be answered somewhat like: "Security was autoconfigured due to being in the classpath and the @SpringBootApplication annotation being used, here is how you can authenticate your requests ...". On the other hand I don't really agree with this question, instead of focusing on exacting some punishment, etc. on the closers your focus should be on getting the question reopened. Commented Feb 18 at 13:21
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    @AbdulAzizBarkat: indeed. This meta post is focusing on assumed bad intentions when none can objectively be shown or could possibly be shown. It's basic premise, that site mods (or truthfully, normal site users with moderation privileges) were purposefully abusing their privileges, cannot be proven. Without someone explicitly stating, "I closed this question because I am unscrupulous", or without objectively demonstrating such behavior with hard data to back this up, this sort of accusation is doomed to go nowhere. And then they ask for punishment without proven guilt. Yikes. Commented Feb 18 at 13:29
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    @JoreJoh mistakes do happen and the site is built to accommodate that, closed questions can be reopened the same way they were closed (by votes). Its best not to assume malice without proper proof for the same. Try applying Hanlon's razor Commented Feb 18 at 13:40
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    Whoa. I’ve been halfway through the answer and I still don’t see it addressing any of "Is there any way I can interact with a Spring Boot Security application with no explicit configuration and actually visit my endpoints? Or is it in practical terms inaccessible unless I explicitly write some configuration?" Consider that while this would be a great blog post, it might not be so useful for SO in its current form. Commented Feb 18 at 13:48
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    Also, mods cannot revoke asking privileges or undo the automatic system ban.
    – Dharman Mod
    Commented Feb 18 at 13:59
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    @JoreJoh Yeah, that’s kind of what "half way through" means. Mind, I’m not saying it didn’t answer the questions. It just doesn’t look all that useful to someone looking for the actual answer, since it is buried in all the rest. You might want to consider, since it looks like an actual, objective shortcoming that might be reflected in votes. Commented Feb 18 at 16:04
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    I wouldn't personally have voted to close the question as needing more focus, but there are thousands of active users on this site with many differing opinions who are just trying to curate content. Talking about these folks as "abusing" their privilege or asking how to have them "disciplined" for having a different opinion to yours is at best an over-reaction. I know it is irritating, and sometimes feels unfair, when a question or answer we have written is downvoted, particularly if we personally believe it is high-quality and helpful, but don't blame folks for having different opinions. Commented Feb 18 at 16:58
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    @JoreJoh Mods can see all actions taken by the user. If someone says that a user is systematically abusing site's privileges, we will review their past actions and verify.
    – Dharman Mod
    Commented Feb 19 at 10:43
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    Sorry that you think that you were wronged, but reflect on what you are calling "unfair" here: three users looked into your question and considered it too broad for the site. Not only that, you were provided an extensive answer below explaining why, so it does not seem to be an isolated opinion either. At this point, it would seem to be more unfair to everyone if you were given an exception, just because you personally don't want it closed.
    – E_net4
    Commented Feb 20 at 10:19

1 Answer 1

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The other day, I spend several hours to explore a certain aspect of Spring Security and post a high-quality self-answered question.

With respect: you are not the one who gets to judge this.

I believe I achieved my goal: the answer is detailed and thorough.

Length does not equal quality.

It's debatable whether the question requires an MRE for the application at all, since it's clear that the problem manifests with a hello-world app and as such is not caused by the app code per se. At any rate it is certainly not necessary to show us almost 70 lines of XML build configuration just to support the assertion "However, I have it in my classpath" - which still doesn't actually explain what "it" refers to.

As for the answer, it takes up 11 screens for me. (For comparison, this answer is "only" three and a half screens long, and I wouldn't be surprised if some think that's already excessive, even though I have several separate points to explain.) That's extraordinarily long by Stack Overflow standards. Certainly not record-setting, but certainly more than called for. From what I can tell, the substance of your Q&A pair is:

Q. I have a simple web app using XYZ system. When I try to make a GET request in the naive way, I get a 401 error that implies an authorization failure. What exactly is implementing the authorization requirement (since it isn't in my code), and how do I make a GET request that includes the credentials in the expected format?

A. The framework automatically instantiates a default authenticator which uses ABC schemes for authentication. Therefore, this is the expected format for the request. Here is some code (or other process) to generate an example request.

This should not take anywhere near as much vertical screen space as you have devoted to the topic. In particular, it should not require any exposition of the internals of Spring. All of that is talking about how you learned the answer. But Stack Overflow is not about the research you did. It's about the answer you got. The reason we expect research is in order to find that answer - not to tell us a story about the research.

If you want to share your enthusiasm for how you discovered something interesting or difficult after doing hours of research, that's what a personal coding blog is for.

Please try to write more concisely.

In return, both my question and my answer were downvoted, and I had my asking privileges revoked.

The latter is the consequence of an automated system beyond our control. Please read:

What can I do when getting “We are no longer accepting questions/answers from this account”?

As for downvotes, they are a privilege afforded to everyone with at least 125 reputation.

Either way, this has nothing to do with moderators.

What's more, the question was closed with a far-fetched reason, it allegedly "needs to be more focused". Even though, the question was very clear and the key parts was even hightlighted in bold, "How do I visit endpoints in a Spring Security app with no explicit config?"

First off, this, too, has nothing to do with moderators. Everyone with at least 3000 reputation can vote to close questions, and a mere 15 reputation is required to flag posts for consideration by the former group.

The question very definitely needs more focus. Focus does not mean making it visually apparent where the text of the question is within your post. Focus means taking away irrelevant details, making sure that there is a single question being asked (i.e., that the question couldn't reasonably be split into sub-questions), and making it self-evident that the question can be answered reasonably briefly.

If your own attempt at answering the question is that long, and the question itself includes multiple code blocks, people will naturally conclude that the question can't be answered reasonably briefly.

Keep in mind that, as described in the tour, the experience of reading Stack Overflow is supposed to involve getting an answer promptly and directly; and that Stack Overflow is designed with the expectation that more than one person will attempt to answer the question. If you make the question and answer this long, users will have to scroll a long time to see other answers. That's not being considerate of others' time.

As a rule, if you need bold highlighting to make it clear what the question actually is, then you have written too much.

So I wonder, is there any mechanism at all to discipline moderators who abuse their authority? If so, how can I initiate such a process?

What happened here did not involve moderators, did not entail abuse, and only required "authority" under a very generous interpretation of the term.

In the future, if you actually do have a complaint about moderator actions, you can bring it here, but please first read the relevant FAQ on the general Stack Exchange meta:

What recourse do I have if I believe a moderator has abused their privileges?


As some general advice for the future:

  1. It seems that you understand the general expectation to do research for questions on the main Stack Overflow site. The same idea applies to Meta. This is really general, "how to get along with an established, gate-kept community" stuff: when a space documents the basics of its norms openly, you should consider yourself responsible for understanding those basics.

  2. In particular, please do not try to level accusations unless you have reasonable confidence regarding whom you're accusing. It looks bad to complain about "mods" when they weren't actually involved.

  3. If you have a negative experience, when you go to find out what you can do about it, strongly consider the possibility that you may have been at least partially at fault.

  4. If you have a single negative experience, when you go to find out what you can do about it, try not to generalize without more evidence. Ideally, avoid asking about generalities if you can see any possibility of a resolution that's specific to your situation.

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  • The site describes self-answered questions as a way to share knowledge. That's what I tried to do: to share knowledge, to educate. Not simply tell readers how to do X. I see SO as an educational platform. A lot of folks do. I invite SO mods and management to recognize it and stop punishing people for that vision Commented Feb 20 at 9:08
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    @JoreJoh Like others before you, you are trying to tell us to shift the vision for Stack Overflow to become something which was simply not designed to be. Granted, knowledge sharing is something which does happen in the platform. However, that does not make it an educational platform. Once you recognize that, you will be much less likely get the feeling of being punished.
    – E_net4
    Commented Feb 20 at 9:32
  • My question and answer are really beside the point. The point is SO doesn't provide any defence mechanisms for users in such cases. If user N closed my question, as I believe, unfairly, and I want to have them see consequences for that (I don't talk death penalty, at least some formal warning), I first have to prove a systematic pattern. When I try to check if that incident is part of a larger pattern of frivolous closures (and report a systematic abuse if it's confirmed), I discover that such information is not available to me. In other words, SO makes it impossible to defend yourself in such Commented Feb 20 at 10:19
  • ......scenarios Commented Feb 20 at 10:19
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    immediately complaining about mods is the act of assuming Stack Overflow is the same as other sites - exactly the best way to completely misunderstand and probably hate the site, because it really is nothing like any other website so it'll only disappoint. There is no "seeing consequences" to other people, we don't do that as regular curators. We only deal with content. If action against a person needs to be taken that will be based on statistics such as flags and votes and it will be performed by people responsible for doing that.
    – Gimby
    Commented Feb 20 at 14:30
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    @JoreJoh you want a formal warning for what could be an honest mistake? Sounds a bit intense here. Especially that people don't seem to agree this is as high quality as you claim...
    – Patrice
    Commented Feb 20 at 16:39
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    "If user N closed my question, as I believe, unfairly, and I want to have them see consequences for that" - first you must convince others that it was unfair. This is going to be difficult for you, based on what I have seen so far - because the evidence suggests that you currently a) do not understand the standards for closure and b) are heavily resistant to having those standards explained to you. In fact, to merit "consequences" you should be expected to show more than simply that the closure was unjustified; you'd have to show intent. Commented Feb 21 at 11:00
  • "The site describes self-answered questions as a way to share knowledge. That's what I tried to do: to share knowledge, to educate" - yes, but within the framework of a question that is on-topic for the site, and an answer that just answers the question rather than giving reams of background context. At any rate, the content should be entirely aimed at solving practical programming problems. If you want to talk about the research process, use a personal blog. Stack Overflow is for the conclusions of that research. Commented Feb 26 at 10:18

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