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Stack Overflow question How can I reverse a Java 8 stream and generate a decrementing IntStream of values? (previously titled as "Java 8 stream reverse order") states that it is asking both a specific and general question. The specific question is how, in Java, to produce an IntStream of decrementing values in a specific range (e.g. [4, 3, 2, 1]). The general question is how to reverse a Java stream. The general question applies to the specific since the question asker knows a way to produce the increasing stream ([1, 2, 3, 4]), and reversing that would get them what they're looking for.

General question: What's the proper way to reverse a stream? Assuming that we don't know what type of elements that stream consists of, what's the generic way to reverse any stream?

Specific question:

IntStream provides range method to generate Integers in specific range IntStream.range(-range, 0), now that I want to reverse it switching range from 0 to negative won't work, also I can't use Integer::compare

[…]

This is a highly upvoted question with 234 upvotes and no downvotes, and both the general and specific questions are very useful and on-topic for this site.

However, in actuality this is a bit of an XY problem, as the best solutions to generating a decreasing IntStream of values do not involve reversing an increasing stream of values. So the answers to the general problem do not apply to the answers to the specific problem, and vice versa.

To me, this should have been two different questions, either created as such or edited very early on to be asking only one of its questions. i.e. "How do I generate a decrementing IntStream in a range?" and "How do I reverse a Java stream?". However, given the number of upvotes, and the almost decade that has passed since the question was opened, I think that ship has probably sailed, but maybe I'm wrong.

What should be (or should have been) done here?

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    Fully agreed: "reversing" a stream is a more generic task to what they want. Also not what they want. "reversing" a monotonically stepping int stream can be achieved via at least a couple of completely different ways that are in no way applicable to any other (well, non-numeric) streams with very different runtime results. This is a very clear example of an XY problem, as you point out.
    – VLAZ
    Feb 14 at 20:21
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    "the best solutions to generating a decreasing IntStream of values do not involve reversing an increasing stream of values" This appears to be conflating the task of generating something with reversing something that's already generated. Can you clarify which you're talking about here? That's not an XY problem but two totally separate tasks.
    – TylerH
    Feb 14 at 20:27
  • The above ^ being said, from the question: "Assuming that we don't know what type of elements that stream consists of, what's the generic way to reverse any stream?" How does OP expect to reverse something if they don't know what type of elements are there? You have to know the type and order of something for the concept of "reversing" it to have any possible meaning.
    – TylerH
    Feb 14 at 20:27
  • "What should be (or should have been) done here?" Are there good canonical dupe targets already for each of these questions? If so, dupehammering it as a dupe of both seems like the best outcome.
    – TylerH
    Feb 14 at 20:28
  • @TylerH I think this is the canonical for both.
    – M. Justin
    Feb 14 at 20:32
  • @TylerH "How does OP expect to reverse something if they don't know what type of elements are there?" — You can reverse a Java List without knowing what it contains. Collections.reverse(list) (mutation), list.reversed() (view), or List.copyOf(list) (copy).
    – M. Justin
    Feb 14 at 20:36
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    Yes, "reversing" a stream isn't a thing. Streams are just sources of data that comes out in any frequency. That could be function that generates the data (e.g., just incrementing and returning a number), thus the speed would be essentially "instant". But a stream could also be something like reading data over a socket. Most importantly a stream need be finite. In the general case, you can only reverse a finite stream and only by fully materialising it into a collection then reversing that collection. However, for an int stream finite or not a number can be swapped "in-place" w/ arithmetic
    – VLAZ
    Feb 14 at 20:49
  • @VLAZ Yeah, that would make a good answer to the general question. :-)
    – M. Justin
    Feb 14 at 20:57
  • @VLAZ And your "reversing a finite" stream solution of materializing and restreaming is in fact my existing answer to this question: stackoverflow.com/a/75618153/1108305
    – M. Justin
    Feb 14 at 21:14
  • @M.Justin Yikes. I mean, is there not another set of canonicals, each answering one part of this double question? If not, maybe make them w/ the help/input of some Java SMEs here.
    – TylerH
    Feb 14 at 22:59
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    And thanks for the explanation on reversing--another reason why I avoid Java :-) Thinking it can reasonable "reverse" something when there's no clue what the something is...
    – TylerH
    Feb 14 at 23:01
  • The question is very useful as it is. The first three answers provide fantastic solutions to the general and specific problem and are formatted/written in such a way that you can easily skim them for the type of solution you need. Does it really make SO better if we apply Purism to such things?
    – julaine
    Feb 16 at 9:04
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    @julaine It's not about purism, but pragmatism. When this question was originally asked a decade ago, Stack Overflow was a very different place where such questions were accepted precisely because high-quality answers like the ones it has, were the norm. Later the rules of "what is a valid answer" were perverted to allow almost any sort of rubbish, and this in conjunction with the massive influx of reputation farmers meant that unfocused questions were more likely to attract "answers" from such people and it was more difficult to remove such answers.
    – Ian Kemp
    Feb 16 at 16:56
  • @julaine (cont'd) Thus the rules around questions were changed to restrict their scope, such that they would attract fewer reputation farmers posting non-answers. This is not something the community was particularly happy about doing, but it was also necessary.
    – Ian Kemp
    Feb 16 at 17:05

3 Answers 3

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The specific question is how, in Java, to produce an IntStream of decrementing values in a specific range (e.g. [4, 3, 2, 1]). The general question is how to reverse a Java stream.

The relationship between these two questions is not "specific vs general". There are other ways to get a decreasing range that don't involve reversing an increasing sequence.

Aside from that, there's a further ambiguity, since the question and some answers mention sorting. Do we actually in fact want to reverse the input? Or do we just want the values in descending order?

Old questions like these should normally be closed, generally as Needs More Focus; sometimes as unclear. If both interpretations of the question have been separately asked and answered, consider closing as a duplicate of one, and then adding a duplicate link to the other. If every answer answered one of the questions and chose the same interpretation (or if that's overwhelmingly what the answers are like, in cases where there are many answers), instead edit the question so that it only asks what was answered.

If there are clear sub-questions but no good duplicates, new Q&A can be created first, and then the question multi-dupe-hammered as appropriate.

The point of Stack Overflow is that you get a direct answer to the exact question being asked; if you asked the wrong question, it should be easy to find the (similar) right question, but the answers should be over there. When I see that a question has 34 answers (including 3 deleted), and top answers are directly presented as answering two different questions, I scream internally.

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  • Fair. I've updated my meta question to say that the question "states that it is asking both a specific and general question" rather than that it "is asking both a specific and general question".
    – M. Justin
    Feb 16 at 20:46
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One option would be to create a new question for each of the general and specific questions here, and closing the existing question as a duplicate.

We can't really edit this question to be either the general or specific, since half of the answers would be inapplicable.

A cursory search doesn't reveal a good existing duplicate target for either half of the question that could be used instead. I think the current question effectively serves as the existing canonical answer for both halves, which doesn't help.

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Separate from everything else being discussed here, the title of this question only addresses the general half of what this is asking ("Java 8 stream reverse order").

The current title makes it seem like the question is answering just the general question, and doesn't have the specific component to it. Fixing this helps call to light the dual nature of the question, and helps address part of the problem with having this dual-natured question.

Another problem with this is that it makes it harder to search for the specific part of the question ("How do I generate a decrementing IntStream in Java").

I have updated the title of this question to more fully capture the question currently being asked by it:

"How can I reverse a Java 8 stream and generate a decrementing IntStream of values?"

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    Is this an answer? I mean do we have Q&A format for a chat format?
    – Vega
    Feb 19 at 11:44
  • @Vega It is part of a solution to the problem. By better titling the issue, the dual nature of the question becomes apparent, whereas before it was potentially easy to miss. I'll add this explanation into this answer.
    – M. Justin
    Feb 19 at 16:45
  • Can it be added to the first answer?
    – Vega
    Feb 19 at 16:53
  • @Vega It's a completely separate concern, and a different (and not mutually exclusive) solution. Adding it to the answer would make voting ambiguous, since someone might approve of one approach but not the other. Plus the other answer already has a number of upvotes, so I wouldn't want to change the meaning of the answer for people who have already voted. So no, I don't think this would be good to add to an existing answer.
    – M. Justin
    Feb 19 at 18:08

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