-32

A year ago, a YouTuber named Alex Ziskind published this video:

Uncovering StackOverflow's TOXICITY

One can discuss all sorts of aspects of that video. But - I don't want to do that, nor do I accept the claim that "SO is toxic". What I do want to discuss is the conduct of high-reputation and moderation-capable users in this video (until time point 07:21). Mr. Ziskind created a new SO user, digitalix, and posted a poor, "newbie" question, "How to set up Facebook Authentication in my ReactJS web app?". He then followed the question and reported on what happened to it, as well as what happened after he tried to improve it in a newbie sort of a way.

Now, the question was definitely poor:

  1. It did not provide exact, or close-to-exact, details regarding the problem setup.
  2. It did not indicate what the user has tried so far - if anything.
  3. The question suggests the user had not bothered to search for a relevant question, as otherwise they would have found these

but note that:

  1. The user, digitalix was a reputation-1 brand-new user.
  2. The user started their question by saying "I am new", and said things like "I don't know" and "Please help me".

Certainly, as far as question curation goes, that question was heading down the drain fast. However, here's what could have happened:

  • Users could have preferred close votes over downvotes.
  • A user could have said something like "Have you DDG'ed this issue, or Googled it? Better try that before asking here, we expect more concrete questions showing some effort."
  • A user could have said "We already have a few question about FB authentication and react have you read any of them [with a link here]"

This would have resulted in a much less negative experience, and is more likely to have encouraged the user to actually do what they should have done in the first place.

Instead, we see that:

  • a user comment which doesn't indicate why the question is close-worthy, but instead debates the philosophical point of whether web apps should have FB authentication (?) - even if that commenter has a point, it goes way about the head of a newbie user, and above my head, albeit I'm no ReactJS developer.
  • the first user comment was derisive, hinting that the user is stupid for wanting to do what they wrote they want to do.
  • the tone for the "please see [documentation link" question could have been nicer; and - it was a second comment after the derisive comment, without indicating that the derision was uncalled for, so the psychological effect might be something like: "You are dumb. Please see [link] to read why we think you are dumb."
  • the new user is made aware of downvotes, but not of close votes, i.e. they don't even know that the two might be related in this case.
  • the user was temporary banned from asking questions, after asking a single question. Again, yes, it was a poor question, but that user was only a careless newbie, not a spammer or with any sort of abusive intent. They just made a newbie mistake.

I realize that the site's automatic actions need to account for the burden on the sholders of editors and moderators. I also realize that this was the result of a combination of automatically-applied policies and actions by individual users. But the cumulative effect is quite problematic. Instead of encouraging digitalix to carefully cultivate questions, we brow-beat them and, if it weren't an experiment, probably drove them away.


PS - Yes, I used the "welcoming" tag. Sorry about that; I too frustrated with how SE inc. has weaponized it. I tried to be more concrete here.

42
  • 23
    "Users could have preferred close votes over downvotes." Downvotes and close votes are different things; there's no preference over one of the other, as they denote different things.
    – Thom A
    Feb 12 at 13:13
  • 14
    I'm curious whether the user was actually question-banned. While the ban algorithm is a secret, I'm sure I've heard many times (from veteran curators, and mods), that it's impossible to be banned after asking a single question.
    – cigien
    Feb 12 at 13:13
  • 11
    @cigien Yeah, I'd rather guess that they ran into some rate limit imposed on low-rep users.
    – janw
    Feb 12 at 13:16
  • 6
    My guess, @cigien, is that that the question (which we have no details of) was exceptionally poor and so they received a temporary rate limit;, likely they couldn't post for a day or 2. If only there was some unreleased feature that allowed for better user onboarding...
    – Thom A
    Feb 12 at 13:17
  • 13
    If someone is a "newbie" doesn't matter, @einpoklum . Text like "I am new to XYZ" should be removed from questions, as it's just noise.
    – Thom A
    Feb 12 at 13:28
  • 18
    As for being new to the site, a user who is new should have just finished reading the tour, so actually should be in a position to know some standards. They are also forced to use the question wizard, which has statements like explicitly telling them pictures of code isn't allowed; that these users don't read isn't the rest of the use'r bases fault and honestly is a reason why I suspect so many people downvote the content. If that user hasn't takem 30 seconds to read the site, there's no chance they even bothered to do research (or perhaps even try to answer the problem themselves).
    – Thom A
    Feb 12 at 13:31
  • 12
    I'm not sure what you want to discuss here. The actions you suggest are pretty much in line with what actually happened, especially when viewed through such a negative lens - giving only silent close votes instead of visible quality indications, pointing people at DDG instead of giving concrete feedback, pointing at a heap of other questions and expecting the user to sift through them. Notably, none of you proposed better feedback would have helped them improve the question. Feb 12 at 13:34
  • 18
    I must admit, as well, that I doubt that this "Alex Ziskind" was allowing Stack Overflow to play on a level playing field. No doubt they wanted to demonstrate that the site is "toxic", and so they would have done as much as they could to ensure that they got the reaction they wanted, for content. I'm sure I could create an account, ask a question, and show a wonderful experience. They intentionally wrote a terrible question to start with, and misused the site; it's not toxic that someone had a poor experience there, it's toxic that they tried to label the site toxic when they had a loaded gun.
    – Thom A
    Feb 12 at 13:39
  • 10
    @einpoklum I don't think your meta-question as-is is suitable for such a discussion. IMO both the original comments and your suggested actions can well be interpreted as derisive and condescending. This meta-question re-interpreting "please see [documentation link]" as "You are dumb. Please see [link] to read why we think you are dumb." invites very little confidence that constructive suggestions and criticism (of anyone involved and the situation itself!) would not be reinterpreted equally bad. Please strongly consider to edit it in order to remove the up-front demonization. Feb 12 at 14:10
  • 7
    @cigien 3 downvotes and closure would do this in one shot. A 3-day cooldown is, sadly, necessary or you'd have the really low quality folks flooding the site. That said, we could probably have a better process overall, but that takes developer time, which is in short supply of late.
    – Machavity Mod
    Feb 12 at 14:35
  • 6
    I hammered this because it's really the same discussion we've been having for a long time. The video in the question 3 years ago was a bit more acerbic, but it's just a stream flowing to the same river: "Stack Overflow sucks!". I still think Cody Engel's video response is on-point because he takes the time to explain how to correctly use the site.
    – Machavity Mod
    Feb 12 at 14:43
  • 15
    "A year ago, a YouTuber named Alex Ziskind published this video: Uncovering StackOverflow's TOXICITY" Some dude posted ragebait on YouTube... It doesn't get any more irrelevant.
    – Cerbrus
    Feb 12 at 14:56
  • 8
    A year ago the Stack Overflow community moved on as usual.
    – rene
    Feb 12 at 15:24
  • 6
    Alex Ziskind intentionally asked a low quality question that violated the rules. Alex Ziskind intentionally reported that our community was toxic despite the fact, the only toxicity that i can see, is intentionally asking a low quality question. They also failed to do adequate research on our rules and policies dealing with new users and rate limits. In conclusion, Alex Ziskind experiment is null an void, because they intentionally asked a low quality question. There is a term for a user who intentionally break the rules by submitting low quality contributions to a community like ours. Feb 12 at 19:00
  • 7
    Somewhat related - what's the other side of "welcoming"? Something like "being a good guest"? Because that's what I basically never see of users who criticise the userbase without invoking "welcoming" or "toxic".
    – VLAZ
    Feb 13 at 7:21

1 Answer 1

25

TL;DR: A single user posting a very poor question, that they know is poor, to then share their experience on YouTube isn't an example of a toxic community; it's an example of a person intentionally making the community appear so for content. That they go out of their way to do this, in my opinion, is more showing that the individual is toxic, as they want to intentionally paint the site in a negative light while not using a fair test.


Rather than going on in the comments, I feel that I should add some counter points into an answer; comments can't be downvoted, so the comments aren't a good place to weigh proper opinions.

The points I discuss are in no particular order (though I do visit parts I cover in my comments first):

Firstly I doubt that "Alex Ziskind" could be impartial here. I don't doubt that their intention was to make the site look "toxic" to start with, and (in my opinion), this is toxic behaviour itself. Maybe I'm wrong there, but I had a look at the start of the video, and it certainly looks like they went out of their way to intentionally ask a very poor question, and (probably) put in phrases like "I am new to " and making the only question asked "Can someone help me?" intentionally; they knew the type of responses that would get.

Users could have preferred close votes over downvotes.

Downvotes and close votes are different things. A close vote means that the question is unclear, or off-topic, and needs to be closed until a point where it can be answered. Closing is there to stop answers being contributed; answers to unclear questions result in unclear answers, that likely aren't helpful or useful. On the other hand downvotes denote a lack of research, as well as being not useful or unclear. The question I saw at the start of the video lacked research effort, and it was overly broad and therefore unclear; these are reasons to downvote.

True, questions that are closed are often downvoted too, as there is often some overlap, but this isn't always the case. Good questions can be closed as off-topic, and bad questions can remain open as they are on-topic.

A user could have said "We already have a few question about FB authentication and react have you read any of them [with a link here]"

We expect a user to do research before they asked [their question]; the Tour tells you this, which "Alex Ziskind" reads and then ignores when writing their question (back to that loaded gun analogy). Sure, someone could have linked to an existing Q&A, but the question was so broad that it was unlikely a good candidate could be found.

The user, digitalix was a reputation-1 brand-new user.

Irrelevant. digitalix might have had 1-rep, but that doesn't excuse ignoring the tour that they had just read. The fact that they had read the tour and then threw it out the window is more likely to frustrate users, and I suspect the author knew that.

The user started their question by saying "I am new", and said things like "I don't know" and "Please help me".

This is irrelevant as well. Of course they don't know and need help; they wouldn't be asking otherwise. That they are new is irrelevant as well. If that broadens the scope in the sense that the answer needs to elaborate on the solution then the user can ask the answerer to improve their answer to explain it better. This is the difference between an answer that answers the question and a great answer that explains and answers the question.

the new user is made aware of downvotes, but not of close votes, i.e. they don't even know that the two might be related in this case.

Seeing close votes is an earned privilege and only needs 250 rep. Up/Down votes are a rating system, so are public; we wouldn't want a bad answer to have a score of 5 displayed to 1-rep users, because it has 5 upvotes and 107 downvotes (intentionally extreme example), which might outrank another (new) answer with 4 upvotes and no downvotes.

the user was temporary banned from asking questions, after asking a single question.

More likely they were rate-limited temporarily. Without knowing the error they got, and mod intervention, impossible to know, but if a (new) user asks a very low-quality question, they may well be told that they need to "do better" and so won't allow them to ask another shortly afterwards.

15
  • 3
    "Seeing close votes is an earned privilege and only needs 250 rep." I actually think this is rather unfortunate. 250 rep is huge for many people, especially those that would benefit from being aware their question is a candidate for closure. Feb 12 at 14:21
  • True, @MisterMiyagi . I wonder if part of the problem is that close votes often (requires citation) don't originate from the review queue (now a days) and so the Community User isn't commenting on problems with the question like it would for those performing actions from the queue.
    – Thom A
    Feb 12 at 14:35
  • 5
    Note: the video clearly indicates that the user was rate limited to not posting questions for 3 days (the two days which they waited prior to capturing the screen and one day more).
    – Makyen Mod
    Feb 12 at 15:19
  • I don't think the point of the post was to defend the persons poorly recieved question or their impartiality, but rather how rude or "toxic" the response of the community to the persons' question was.
    – Cuzy
    Feb 13 at 13:46
  • 3
    @Cuzy The response was not rude nor toxic. It was only perceived as such because the user in question expected a helpdesk experience, rather than one provided by a curated repository of quality Q&A, in which both questions and answers are indeed subjected to scrutiny.
    – E_net4
    Feb 13 at 15:30
  • 3
    I, personally, don't think any of the responses were rude of toxic. The comment, for example, that links to an FAQ article detailing why "Can you help me?" isn't a (answerable) question gives a user who is willing to read and retain that information more than enough to improve their question. That the YouTuber went out of their way to ingore the tour, help center, and other content doesn't make the users that they dealt with, who were provided with an intentionally low quality question, "toxic".
    – Thom A
    Feb 13 at 15:50
  • 2
    Put it another way, @Cuzy , if I went into your house, which has a sign saying "please remove your shoes before entering the rest of the house." and as I entered you stated, "Please remember to take off your shoes." and I then didn't, would that make you toxic when I didn't take those shoes off and you had to explain why you wanted me to take my shoes off, and firmly stated for me to do so (again)?
    – Thom A
    Feb 13 at 15:52
  • 1
    eh, it's certainly possible to both be correct or in the right while simultaneously being toxic. (downvoting low quality content is neither.) commenting on the other hand can lead one down that path.
    – Kevin B
    Feb 13 at 15:55
  • @ThomA Of course not. However, leaving comments that imply the user to be "stupid" or even just leaving comments with an aggresive tone I would certainly consider to be rude.
    – Cuzy
    Feb 15 at 8:56
  • And, like I said, I don't think any of the comments implied the user to be stupid, @Cuzy .
    – Thom A
    Feb 15 at 9:01
  • @ThomA That's fair but others may percieve something as rude even if you don't think it is. In the question, OP seems to think that way : the first user comment was derisive, hinting that the user is stupid for wanting to do what they wrote they want to do.
    – Cuzy
    Feb 15 at 9:12
  • Yes, and my counter argument is that it was rude of the user who asked (not the OP her eon Meta) to ignore all the content that told them to not do what they did, and did it anyway, @Cuzy . If you intentionally ignore the rules/guidelines, after being explicitly told them, then you are going to have people be frustrated; the guidelines exist for a reason.
    – Thom A
    Feb 15 at 9:18
  • "A single user posting a very poor question, that they know is poor, to then share their experience on YouTube isn't an example of a toxic community; it's an example of a person intentionally making the community appear so for content." - while I appreciate that Stack Overflow is a beloved punching bag for content creators, it's honestly not clear to me that Alex Ziskind understands that the question is "poor" in the sense of unsuitable for Stack Overflow. If that understanding was present, then I can only interpret the video as an appeal to change Stack Overflow policy. Feb 15 at 9:43
  • (Of course, it's an appeal we've heard many times, and continue to reject out of hand, as it's counter to the explicit and well-considered goal of the site. But some people just refuse to see value in that goal.) Feb 15 at 9:44
  • "The question I saw at the start of the video lacked research effort, and it was overly broad and therefore unclear; these are reasons to downvote. True, questions that are closed are often downvoted too, as there is often some overlap" - there is a ton of overlap; "broad and therefore unclear" contains two closure reasons. The supposed reason for downvoting and not voting to close is "not well researched"; but the Internet is better off for the presence of many highly-voted questions on the site that are answered just fine elsewhere. Feb 15 at 9:47

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .