10

Is there a reason to keep these decade old questions with no activity on them up?

What is there to gain from the questions being up when in many cases the technology being discussed is no longer used in the way it is being referenced and the question itself may no longer be an issue at all?

Not referring to technologies that have specific versions from then that are still in wide use, or technologies which have not fundamentally changed in its structure throughout the years.

Are these specific questions being dealt with?

8
  • 41
    If they're good questions, it's good to keep them open. Even better is to seek answers to these questions, because sometimes we have to work with legacy technology that is poorly documented or undocumented. So these questions about old technology save jobs and skins. Commented Feb 12 at 2:35
  • 7
    Some questions were only adequately answered years later when a new functionality was launched, like: "how to implement X in Y" when much later X became part of Y's standard library. So keeping those questions open adverts someone else re-asking them and it signals an open problem.
    – bad_coder
    Commented Feb 12 at 3:38
  • 28
    Even finding an old question and seeing it is unanswered provides the developer with important information. It tells them that they will likely have to solve their problem without additional guidance, or, if possible, switch to a different technology with a more active community. Commented Feb 12 at 4:36
  • 10
    I used to work on project where we had to upgrade old .NET monolith to support linux. It was full of outdated technologies and cryptic dependencies that doesn't exist anymore. There were no information whatsoever about problems that we had encounter, but sometimes I was stumbling upon a decade old question with no answer that gave me insight on how to continue, as a result I even answered a couple of questions like that. Commented Feb 14 at 12:53
  • 1
    Is there a link to a query page someone can post with unanswered questions sorted by age, oldest first? Commented Feb 14 at 13:59
  • Maybe the questions were rhetorical?
    – Reg
    Commented Feb 14 at 15:22
  • "Is there a reason to keep these decade old questions..." basically translates to what is the value of a question without an answer. Commented Feb 14 at 16:44
  • 2
    @simonalexander2005 there's only unanswered questions, newest first so you need to go to the last page
    – Bergi
    Commented Feb 14 at 18:03

3 Answers 3

34

Are these specific questions being dealt with?

Probably not nearly as much as we'd like. However, that doesn't mean they should be closed or deleted.

in many cases the technology being discussed is no longer used in the way it is being referenced and the question itself may no longer be an issue at all?

The Banks Still Run On Cobol (TM). The fact that someone would never recommend a particular technology for a new project, doesn't mean there isn't anyone else out there stuck with it because migration would be harder.

If the question is actually obsoleted - for example, it's asking about a web API that's no longer provided - then the question can be closed with the "typo or not reproducible" reason.

If the question doesn't meet today's standards for some other reason, it should be closed - even if it met standards when it was asked. In particular: maybe it was ignored, then someone else asked the same question and got answers, and nobody at the time noticed that the new question was a duplicate (the old question couldn't have been used as a target, anyway, if it didn't have an answer). So in this case, the old, stale question should definitely be closed as a duplicate to the new one - chronology doesn't matter.

But otherwise, it could be of significant historical interest. Consider editing to improve the question; consider upvoting if it's interesting; consider placing a bounty if it's really interesting. There are people out there with deep knowledge of how older systems worked, especially when they nominally still do.

3
  • 8
    "actually obsoleted - for example, it's asking about a web API that's no longer provided" - just like your cobol example, there are legacy applications that run (and are still maintained) only in outdated browsers
    – Bergi
    Commented Feb 14 at 10:13
  • 3
    @Bergi I believe by "web API" they mean Server side Web API and not the ones built into browsers. Commented Feb 14 at 12:51
  • 2
    Even when a server-side implementation of an API dies, it does not necessarily render documentation about that API useless or information about it un-findable. Someone might need to re-implement it, or understand what an old piece of code was trying to do by calling a now dead endpoint.
    – 9072997
    Commented Feb 14 at 22:24
7

Is there a reason to keep these decade old questions with no activity on them up?

Corollary:

Is there any reason to close or delete them?

You haven't provided a convincing argument for the latter, so why not leave them be?

2
  • 1
    A good rule of thumb for life in general - when in doubt, do no harm. Commented Feb 14 at 22:04
  • @Mark A better rule is, "do no harm" Commented Feb 18 at 15:19
6

Some old questions will already get automatically deleted. But there are a few criteria for that. Specifically:

If the question is more than 365 days old, and ...

  • has a score of 0 or less, or a score of 1 and a deleted owner
  • has no answers
  • has no active bounty
  • is not locked
  • has view count <= the age of the question in days times 1.5
  • has 1 or 0 comments
  • isn't on a meta site

... it will be automatically deleted. (These are termed "abandoned" questions in the code.)

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .