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I see a trend in burning these so called dependent tags, when they never actually meet the burnination criteria. The proposer of burnination mostly bluffs that it meets the criteria. This is not my just my own opinion, but something that many SO users know. For example the top voted comment in official burninate process agrees with this claim.

  • I believe this is due to recent supply of extra manpower to carry out any burnination and the presence of organized effort. Supply and demand. There's too much supply of manpower without a need for a tag to be burnt.

  • I was recently made aware of the gamification points/leaderboard for burn actions too, which encourages unnecessary burninations, just like SO reputation encourages spamming answers to gamify reps.


I propose to strictly enforce or relax the criteria.

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    I see a trend in burning these so called dependent tags, when they never actually meet the burnination criteria. Maybe I'm bad at spotting trends but except the last burn where you posted a competing answer, which other burninations qualify for your trend?
    – rene
    Jan 16 at 16:52
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    The burnination criteria as defined by Shog was more of a guidelines, and a tag should not fail one to be considered kept (ideally). All tags are supposed to be: unambiguous, on topic, meaningful, and unambiguous (?) again.
    – Braiam
    Jan 16 at 17:43
  • @Braiam If that were so, I'm ok with the requests. If community consensus is all that is required, then that would be great and we can skip these fake portrayal of fulfilling these criteria. But I believe CMs gave teeth/power to these criteria in their posts, which I believe makes it binding.
    – TheMaster
    Jan 16 at 17:49
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    @TheMaster remember that Shog was a CM too. Also, the only binding thing was that there must be discussion, not what the content of the discussion is.
    – Braiam
    Jan 16 at 17:54
  • @Braiam I don't think that's true, if so, users wouldn't be claiming it fulfills all the criteria or that since it failed a criteria it shouldn't be considered like here meta.stackoverflow.com/a/427777 If that were however true, then my only problem is with this post: meta.stackoverflow.com/a/324071 Can we edit it to say these are not binding?
    – TheMaster
    Jan 16 at 18:01

4 Answers 4

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Ultimately this was a self-inflicted wound by the SO community. The criteria was, ideally, that "a good tag should meet all 4 criteria". Just changing fail ALL to ANY and making the process leaner would go a long way towards expediting the process.

As for the "harm" criteria, I would change it around: is doing any "good". I know that harm is easily defined in most context, in this one is the total opposite. A good tag should get eyeballs into the questions, even if it's the only tag on the question. If a tag can't attract eyeballs to the questions asked... then it's not a good tag.

There are a little more than 61000 tags on the system, which gives about 582 unique answers per tag. I seriously doubt that there are only 580 average answers per potential topic on the site, so either we need more answers, or the number of tags is very inflated.

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    I don't disagree with it being inflated (and so we shouldn't be too worried when we loose 6 to 8 tags) but lets not give the SEDE-happy folks the idea that statistical reasons and a clever query can validate a burn.
    – rene
    Jan 16 at 18:20
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    I like the idea if changing harm into good. Love to see a full guidance sentence on that.
    – rene
    Jan 16 at 18:21
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I'm not convinced the problem is at the enforcing / relaxing end of things.

The burninate-request tag wiki already has this guidance:

Your request needs to obtain community consensus prior to being acted upon, so the Meta question you create should present enough evidence to support the removal of the tag. For example, include evidence like wrong/ambiguous usage, lack of context, presence of off-topic questions, and statistics about related tags. Down votes, comments and answers defending the tag are signs for lack of consensus. A burnination should not be taken on before a clear and widely supported solution does obtain consensus.

Some burninate requesters come to meta when they stumble over a tag. That is: before their stumble they hardly ever seen, heard, used or filtered on that tag. That is a pretty weak signal to start with gathering evidence.

If voting is to be believed, and in the process it is made clear we should not, stumbled upon burninate requests might pick-up a fair amount of votes. I'm not going to dictate how the meta crowd should use their votes but usefulness of a burninate request can not be determined by the punny title alone. Use your votes carefully.

I would love to live in an ideal world where all tags are well used and maintained by their SMEs. Unfortunately due to size and lack of sufficient curation it is sometimes needed to clean-up tags. The process might not be ideal but I don't see major mishaps when a burn is decided on. Therefor making changes now without enough signal that the process is actively failing feels premature.

I advice against making any changes.

addressing raised issues:

  1. What causes harm?
    if a tag makes finding questions to answer hard, harder, impossible If SMEs decide it, what to do in cases where there are no SMEs. if there are no SMEs then what is the fuss about?
  2. Is "causing harm" a ultimate criteria and Is it binding?
    No, it is there to trigger self-reflection on anyone proposing a burninate request.
  3. Are the 4 other criteria binding?
    Yes
  4. Can community consensus overrule all 5 criteria?
    No, but I can't guarantee that the meta-crowd rule-lawyers themselves out of this
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    I would prefer if this answer is edited to include pressing questions like, 1. What causes harm? If SMEs decide it, what to do in cases where there are no SMEs. 2. Is "causing harm" a ultimate criteria and Is it binding? 3. Are the 4 other criteria binding? 4. Can community consensus overrule all 5 criteria? The criteria has strict well defined rules, but this post seems intentionally vague, while simultaneously defending the said rules.
    – TheMaster
    Jan 16 at 18:24
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    I hate to bring this to you but the criteria are not black-and-white and needs consideration in each case. It is blurry by design.
    – rene
    Jan 16 at 18:50
  • Thanks for the answer to the questions and especially for the interaction. I do wish they're black and white though - to the point where they could be automated. I can't guarantee that the meta-crowd rule-lawyers themselves out of this That summarised my entire question and my beef :) I did go with the other answer(for now), as the change from "if it causes harm" to "if it is not doing good" would be greatly inline with the actual ground reality and as such is a great suggestion(which you loved as well). Thanks again.
    – TheMaster
    Jan 16 at 18:59
0

My proposal for Enforcing:

To quote rene,

In any case, the ultimate criterion for burnination is whether the tag is actually causing harm

  • No proposer even considers this criterion, even though it is clearly stated as the ultimate criterion.

  • What is harm? How is harm defined? Lest any future proposer bluff their way out. It is defined in burninate process

If a particular tag is bringing lots of off-topic posts to the site, then it certainly is harmful.

I propose adding "75% prevalance rate of offtopic questions in a tag" to define "lots" in the previous quote.

  • Even if we put 5% as "lots", Almost none of the recently large scale burninated tags caused any harm. Yet they're all burninated.

All these large scale burninations efforts, if they themselves didn't actually cause any harm, are mostly pointless and the effort is better spent elsewhere. To quote Shog9,

If it looks like pointless busywork, it probably is pointless busywork...

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    Given that tags are mainly used to get a question in front of the correct SME, harm isn't a number. Harm is done when an SME experiences more and more trouble finding answerable questions due to their tag being inundated with questions that have nothing to do with the tag at all.
    – rene
    Jan 16 at 17:01
  • @rene If you would like to use that definition, almost all recent large scale burns like [ide], [script], [protection] would barely have any SMEs. Would you agree if I said these caused "zero harm"?
    – TheMaster
    Jan 16 at 17:04
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    The existence of bad, ambiguous tags makes it less likely that good tags are going to be used. That causes harm, by making it more difficult for experts that use the better tags to find questions to deal with.
    – yivi
    Jan 16 at 17:06
  • @yivi But I rarely find any SMEs complaining about these tags. For eg, when [protection] was burnt, relatively speaking, we were the only ones with any experience with the tag and we both opposed it, and the only other answer was made by someone who wasn't using the tag and the answer was just "Yes, let's burn it" not that it caused any harm. Who decides this causes harm? The users using it or the users who want something to burn...?
    – TheMaster
    Jan 16 at 17:18
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    The users proposing, voting, and dealing with the burninations are SMEs that complain about the tags. Of course, they weren't experts on "protection", since that's exactly the point: "protection" is not a well-defined subject, so it's difficult to be an "expert" in it.
    – yivi
    Jan 16 at 17:20
  • @yivi So, if I propose that I burn [python], do I suddenly become a SME in python? If I vote for a post that causes for burning [python], do I become SME in python? Those dealing with burninations/voting/proposing aren't necessarily SMEs..
    – TheMaster
    Jan 16 at 17:24
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    That's an absurd argument. It's ridiculous and disingenuous. I'm sorry but I won't take the bait.
    – yivi
    Jan 16 at 17:24
  • The extrapolation is indeed absurd, but that's the point. Those involved in actually answering/ participating in SO tags are different from Meta users who participate in these burninings. That causes harm, by making it more difficult for experts that use the better tags to find questions to deal with. I was an expert in Apps script and [protection] didn't cause any difficulty. There were no other experts using [protection], participating in that discussion AFAIK, that claimed it caused harm and yet, it was burnt.
    – TheMaster
    Jan 16 at 17:28
  • @rene Harm is done when an SME experiences more and more trouble finding answerable questions due to their tag being inundated with questions that have nothing to do with the tag at all. I still believe some kind of quantification is needed. Something like badge holders, with at least some participation in the tag(even if forced to remove it in an tag they are an expert in), have to have weightage over users who have no participation in the tag.
    – TheMaster
    Jan 16 at 17:44
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    @rene what if there's no SME due the tag itself being off topic?
    – Braiam
    Jan 16 at 17:47
  • @Braiam use the off-topic tag on a C++ question. Problam s0lved.
    – rene
    Jan 16 at 18:08
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    It feels like you're really focused on hard numbers here, but we're humans, not machines. We should be capable of using subjective judgment for whether a tag is causing harm or not. Jan 16 at 22:45
  • @JohnMontgomery Are humans better than machines? Is subjective better than objective? If we have a hard set criteria for the right path, wouldn't that be beneficial to all those involved?
    – TheMaster
    Jan 17 at 1:49
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My proposal for Relaxation:

However if the community thinks burnination of these tags is really needed or if people just want to do pointless busywork, let's do it the legal way, instead of sneaking around. I propose the following relaxation.

  • Remove the "harm" ultimate criterion
  • Relax the remaining criteria to 2 out of 4
  • If it fails the above criteria, overwhelming community consensus can still be used to bypass all the rules.
  • Overwhelming Community consensus can be defined as Net +100 on the proposed post and all opposing answers at -7 or lower within 30 days of proposal
2
  • I don't understand the sneaking around. Are that the users that simply edit out useless tags without ever coming to meta?
    – rene
    Jan 16 at 16:54
  • @rene Meaning claiming it meets the burninate criteria, when they know it doesn't, ignoring the ultimate criterion that it causes harm... that's what I mean by sneaking around or just beating around the bush. Answering questions with "No, but..... why this no shouldn't matter in this specific case.."
    – TheMaster
    Jan 16 at 17:00

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