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I wrote an answer today, to a question I found interesting. The answer started:

This is my favorite weird constexpr issue: the constexpr array size problem resolved by P2280.

[... multiple paragraphs of text follow, including suggestions of workarounds ...]

The answer was edited to say:

This is my favorite weird constexpr issue. I've written about it at my blog here: The constexpr array size problem; it was resolved by P2280.

I did not like that phrasing, so I rolled it back. I'm generally very cool with people editing my answers (especially to fix my endless stream of typos), but this read awkwardly, I think it's pretty obvious from clicking on the link that it's my blog. Also the editor didn't feel the need to attribute my paper, and I don't think the attribution is in any way relevant to the answer. Both the blog and the paper are just extended, detailed discussions of the problem at hand that the OP of the question might find useful. I am trying to be helpful.

The edit got rolled back again. I rolled it back and left a comment politely requesting to stop editing my answer. The answer then got multiple downvotes and I got multiple users downvoting the answer alleging that linking to my own blog post without explicit attribution violates the spammer guidelines for self-promotion.

When the original question was closed as a duplicate, to a better worded, more active question (my bad for not searching), I posted a similar version of the answer to the more active question since it provides added useful context and information to the other answers that already existed. That answer was somehow downvoted to -5 and removed (edit: the answer has since been undeleted, so I've removed the link).

This strikes me as way, way too overeager policing. Linking to my own blog post for added context and information for answers, without explicitly saying that it's mine, is not spam. It is not self-promotion (hell, not only do I generate no revenue from the blog, I'm not sure I've even set up analytics properly to track how many views I get... I'm sure it's in the dozens). It is not being a snake oil salesman. And it's not even a link-only answer; the answers have other context that is not entirely included within the link.

I really do not think the original answer merited downvoting, editing, or deleting. I do not know what problem we are solving here.

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  • 17
    Do note that a spam flag automatically down votes the post, the users might not have down voted at all. Jan 10 at 19:28
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    This doesn't make me feel particularly motivated to write answers about C++ features added by papers I authored.
    – T.C.
    Jan 10 at 19:32
  • 18
    What you did isn't fine; removal of the disclosure was incorrect.
    – Thom A
    Jan 10 at 19:41
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    @ThomA Why? It's not self-promotion - there is nothing to... promote. It's not a product. Does T.C. have to disclose that he is affiliated with cppreference for every cppreference link he puts in his answers? Or whenever he links to the C++ draft? Cause he doesn't (because that requirement would be absurd), is somebody going to go flag and edit all of his answers now in the name of purity?
    – Barry
    Jan 10 at 19:51
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    @Barry This isn't based on what your definition of spam is or even what the general definition of spam is. This is based on what Stack Overflow's definition of spam is. On the promotion page, it explicitly states: "if you mention your product, website, etc. in your question or answer (or any other contribution to the site), you must disclose your affiliation in your post."
    – Jesse
    Jan 10 at 20:05
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    Additionally, you were given a link to this page in the comments by multiple people (myself included), which also explicitly said that you needed to disclose affiliation or your answers could potentially be deleted as spam. Only after you not only ignored these comments but even removed the disclosure that someone else added (minutes after at least my comment was posted, mind you) did your first answer get downvoted and your second deleted.
    – Jesse
    Jan 10 at 20:05
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    "but this read awkwardly, I think it's pretty obvious from clicking on the link that it's my blog" I can't even begin to imagine the argument for either of these claims. "Well the two answers there certainly suggest strongly that what I did was fine" - this, neither. Jan 10 at 20:20
  • 16
    It shouldn't require leaving the site to determine that the link was to content you wrote.
    – Kevin B
    Jan 10 at 20:26
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    I get the impression that you aren't actually here to learn where you went wrong, at this point, only to tell us (the community) that they were wrong... I'm out.
    – Thom A
    Jan 10 at 20:28
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    Removing affiliation information entirely isn't word choice preference. That you state that you think it is demonstrates you haven't understood the response here, or don't want to. I would like to assume the former.
    – Thom A
    Jan 10 at 20:37
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    @T.C. The rules for what requires disclosure of affiliation are a bit complex. I'd prefer not to go into detail in comments, because it requires quite a bit more text (trying to distill more than a decade worth of MSO and MSE posts) than can be contained in a comment. I do recognize that more detail is needed here in an answer. However, that said, disclosure is not required for links to official documentation when the question is directly about the thing which is being linked to. In such cases, disclosure is recommended (and often is beneficial to an answer), but isn't required.
    – Makyen Mod
    Jan 10 at 21:13
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    @T.C. "I guess I should start flagging them for deletion then. Too bad I can't just delete them myself." - or you could... edit them? Jan 10 at 23:02
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    @Barry it's kinda hard to see your avatar on your blog without going to it.
    – Kevin B
    Jan 10 at 23:14
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    People post content that is SE spam or SE over-promotion. These things cost investigation by curating users. Disclosure rules reduce that waste. Effort writing & reading posts following disclosure rules is the cost of a larger savings.
    – philipxy
    Jan 11 at 1:58
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    @Barry you've done more than "express disagreement". And yes, it has been aggressive.
    – VLAZ
    Jan 12 at 6:20

2 Answers 2

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N.B. your spam-deleted answer has since had its spam flags canceled and been undeleted by a moderator. As for the matter of disclosure in posts...

It's a site rule that you need to explicitly disclose affiliation in your posts. That's not 'overly aggressively policing', it's complying with the site rules.

Linking to my own blog post for added context and information for answers, without explicitly saying that it's mine, is not spam.

Yes, it is, if you don't disclose that affiliation. From the opening paragraph on the Help Center (AKA The Site Rules) page for How to not be a spammer:

The community here tends to vote down overt self-promotion and flag it as spam. Post good, relevant answers, and if some (but not all) happen to be about your product or website, that’s okay. However, if you mention your product, website, etc. in your question or answer (or any other contribution to the site), you must disclose your affiliation in your post.

Emphasis mine.

Do I think a spam flag is warranted for such an omission? At the outset, no, but if you insist on removing the site rules-mandated affiliation, I can see how a user might get upset about that and just flag it for spam and let a moderator handle it from there.

Pretty much any resource or prior question you find on the subject, including the one linked above by Thom A, is going to say, either explicitly or implicitly, that you need to disclose your affiliation, and for good reason. Doing so is a tiny act that helps make it clear to readers that there is a potential conflict of interest. Even if (big if) one could argue successfully that disclosure is not always necessary, removing that disclosure when it was already there is never helpful, only harmful.

The only thing removing disclosure of affiliation does is obfuscate a potential conflict of interest. And that... makes you look like a spammer.

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    Your points are valid here about declaring affiliation, but spam is wrong; that has a very clear definition on Stack Overflow, and the post linked isn't spam. If a rollback "war" (about affiliation) occured, then a custom flag should have been raised.
    – Thom A
    Jan 10 at 19:29
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    @ThomA Undisclosed affiliation is considered spam according to the site. The goal of the spam is irrelevant.
    – TylerH
    Jan 10 at 19:30
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    What about the linked answer "Exists only to promote a product or service"?
    – Thom A
    Jan 10 at 19:30
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    I'm hard pressed to understand by what definition my link counts as "overt self-promotion." Ironically, the lack of saying "READ MY AWESOME BLOG POST" makes it hard to be any kind of self-promotion...
    – Barry
    Jan 10 at 19:30
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    @ThomA Modal text is often less than ideal, I commiserate with you on that; I've been wanting our close vote reasons to be reverted back to the old, far better, reasons for years. That being said, Help Center articles trump the blurb used to describe a flag. And I don't know how more clear I can be than "here's the Help Center page on spam, which explicitly states not to do what you have described doing in your post".
    – TylerH
    Jan 10 at 19:33
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    I cannot agree with you, @Tyler. Spam is spam; it is only there to advertise something. The OP answer was not that; they provided an answer and simply didn't disclose affiliated to a related blog post. If that link were removed, it wouldn't be spam either. The spam flags were wrong; unless the OP is also affiliated to the other links as well.
    – Thom A
    Jan 10 at 19:38
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    @ThomA Take it up with the site, then, I guess. It's their rules, definition, and practices you need to get changed. OP is complaining about an edit that added explicit affiliation disclosure to a link to OP's blog, not someone else's. They even argue that it should be obvious that it is their blog and thus explicit disclosure is not needed.
    – TylerH
    Jan 10 at 19:47
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    @Barry You're missing the important, overarching point here. One cannot rely on intuition in terms of 'will someone else know whether and to what extent I am affiliated with this link'. That's precisely why we have a rule which, as this answer clearly shows, states you need to disclose that affiliation always, no matter what.
    – TylerH
    Jan 10 at 20:28
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    @TylerH Where I am stuck though is why it is relevant who is affiliated with this link. It is not a product that I am selling. I derive no more value from people reading that post than I derive from people reading an answer I post here. It is extremely hostile to me to cite a rule about self-promotion to attack me about an answer that doesn't even promote me.
    – Barry
    Jan 10 at 20:31
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    @Barry if you want to request that the community change a rule, you can do that. But that's not what you're doing in this post. In this post you're complaining about users who are simply enforcing site rules, and refusing to acknowledge that the behavior violated said rules in the first place. My final advice here: you are in a hole. Quit digging.
    – TylerH
    Jan 10 at 20:35
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    @Dmitry What a ridiculous comment. I am applying "the rule" to "the case" as described by the OP. That's how the world works. That you disagree with the rule is not our problem.
    – TylerH
    Jan 11 at 13:54
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    @Dmitry I literally linked to the rule page and quoted the relevant text with emphasis. Did you read my answer?
    – TylerH
    Jan 11 at 14:19
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    @Dmitry A rule is a rule. Whether or not you think it's "correct" is irrelevant. If you break the law, you'll still be arrested regardless of whether or not you agree with it.
    – Jesse
    Jan 11 at 20:25
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    @Jesse dogmatical belief in any rule is a religion (not knowledge). If that's a case I have nothing to say.
    – Dmitry
    Jan 12 at 8:12
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    @Barry you've already been informed by a moderator that disclosure is needed. The case here is closed, there is no room for you to argue it does not apply to you. If you still disagree, then use the contact form and discuss this directly with staff.
    – VLAZ
    Jan 12 at 21:24
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The edit to your post was correct; disclosure of links you are affiliated to is required. The edit to your post to denote that was actually a good edit and you should not have rolled it back or rejected it. If you were unhappy with the wording you could adjust it, but you needed to retain the disclosure as it's required.

As for the flagging of spam, this I disagree with; the post is not there to solely promote your work. If we removed that link it would still be an answer. If you did rollback that edit then a custom moderator flag should have been raised instead and a moderator would be able to inform you of the importance of including disclosure of affiliation.

If your post was purely to promote a specific product, which you might gain monetary funds as a result from (perhaps due to an affiliate link) I could more understand these flags; there is something for you to gain and affiliation disclosure is so important there. I don't see any malice here, and that's something moderators, and curators, should take into account.

A user in your deleted answer, however, does note that you more or less posted 2 very similar answers to promote the same page on your site; that is less "ok", and I can see why users would be less happy about it. Promoting it once is fine, prompting it twice shortly after the other, with similar (the same) wording, and lacking affiliation in both isn't. Looking at your posts, however, you don't actually promote your site often, so this seems more of an education issue rather than malice again; something that a custom moderator flag could have handled.

TL;DR: you were on the wrong side of the thin line here, but marginally (in my view). The reactions of the users, in my opinion, were incorrect in flagging as spam (a custom flag should have been used), but your actions to remove affiliation and repost the same content was incorrect too.

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    Separate from everything else, I did not "repost the same content." The two answers have same intro sentence, but the rest of the content differs, and are appropriately tailored to their respective questions. I do not see what about this is "incorrect."
    – Barry
    Jan 10 at 20:00

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