53

How can I test what my readme.md file will look like before committing to GitHub? is locked and closed by a mod as "seeking recommendations". The question itself does not ask for recommendations. It's just that people have posted a lot of answers giving software recommendations (and pretty much everyone gave a recommendation missed the nuance of the question).

In fact, no software recommendation is needed. GitHub's interface itself provides this functionality.

  • This answer was pretty much right. People pointed out a limitation in the comments that is now solved by a "show diff" checkbox. Another limitation pointed out in the comments about centering is no longer reproducible.
  • Essentially the same answer was also posted by another user.
  • Another great answer was posted here showing how to use GitHub's API to render markdown as GitHub renders it.

This seems like a rather unfortunate situation. Because the post is locked, the best answers can no longer be voted up, and people will need to scroll at least 4 answers down to see an instance of the best one...

I don't know where I'm going with this, sorry. Neither do I have a particular suggestion in mind of what to do.


I'm personally surprised how many people think this question is off-topic. GitHub is a cloud hosting service for remote Git repositories. Git is clearly a tool for / used by software developers. A readme is documentation, and there are tons of other documentation markup formats and questions that we allow about usage of tools that render those markup formats (Javadoc, JSDoc, Doxygen, reStructuredText, etc.) The question is much more specific than it might first appear to be. It's about how to get a specific rendering and presentation of a specific Markdown specification / flavour - that is - GitHub flavoured Markdown, as converted to HTML in the precise manner that GitHub's Markdown-to-HTML converter does it, and with the specific presentation of that content that GitHub's UI uses (its stylesheets).

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  • 8
    While the question does not seek recommendations, I would argue that it's not about programming. It's about the use of the Github site for document publishing, not for a programming task. Markdown isn't a programming language. Jan 10 at 0:43
  • 59
    @KarlKnechtel neither is HTML or CSS :)
    – Gimby
    Jan 10 at 9:34
  • 68
    @KarlKnechtel Questions about using tools "commonly used by programmers" are on-topic, and I'd argue that GitHub fits that category, even if it is about publishing documentation.
    – Hulk
    Jan 10 at 11:18
  • 5
    @hulk point 4 in that list is an AND. so it's "tools commonly used by programmers AND it is a practical, answerable problem that is unique to software development". It is written as poorly as it can be, but at some point it has to stop being in the blind spot.
    – Gimby
    Jan 10 at 12:39
  • 10
    I guess the point is not with the question being closed (and not accepting new answers), but locked (and not accepting votes on existing answers).
    – Cerberus
    Jan 10 at 13:53
  • 7
    I dunno, it looks like it's asking for tool recommendations to me. How else do you interpret "how can I view a .md file" where OP accepts an answer that recommends some tools? Put another way, this user is asking "what programs or services can read/render a .md file". That's off-topic all day long.
    – TylerH
    Jan 10 at 15:30
  • 13
    @TylerH Uh... no? Asking for "how" to do something is definitely not off topic. Just because something can be accomplished with a third party tool doesn't make the question off topic– otherwise we'd be closing every programming question that can be answered with a library suggestion, which is obviously not the case.
    – zcoop98
    Jan 10 at 17:16
  • 10
    @Kevin I'd argue what Hulk did above, that using GitHub (and GitHub's feature of displaying a readme Markdown document in repositories) is using a "tool commonly used by programmers", which is also squarely on topic, just as much as asking about a feature in an IDE would be.
    – zcoop98
    Jan 10 at 17:25
  • 4
    "How do I preview markdown", absent any given IDE that the user is already using, is asking for recommendations even if it isn't directly saying so. The obvious answer to how should i preview markdown before i commit it is to preview it in whatever editor you wrote it with. Suggesting to use github's editor is no different from suggesting to use vscode. The question isn't answerable without recommending tools. It will always be the tool recommendation question that it is.
    – Kevin B
    Jan 10 at 17:35
  • 15
    @KevinB I disagree with regard to this specific question, since it's specifically about GitHub. GitHub has built-in, first-class support for viewing readme files as Markdown (they're displayed as rendered information about the current directory being viewed). Since the question is specifically about built-in GitHub functionality, that can be solved with built-in GitHub functionality, and questions about "software tools commonly used by programmers" is explicitly on-topic for SO, this can fully be answered without recommending additional tools.
    – M. Justin
    Jan 10 at 17:39
  • 8
    @KevinB I think the answers need to be something more than just recommending a Markdown editor/renderer. It should be somehow specific to GitHub (e.g., specifically rendering GitHub-flavored Markdown, built into a tool officially supported by GitHub such as VS Code, in the GitHub UI, etc.) and include that information in the answer (as opposed to, say "In the web, use [name of tool]. It's awesome."). That would remove most or all of the lower-quality answers.
    – Ryan M Mod
    Jan 10 at 22:10
  • 7
    @KarlKnechtel - never forget, that for StackOverflow asking about "software tools commonly used by programmers" is specifically On-Topic. Now there is an argument whether github is within the meaning of the word "tool", but at that point we are really splitting hairs over something that is not defined in the Help pages. I think the question should be valid and reopened. Jan 11 at 0:12
  • 3
    Indeed, that question is not about github at all, it's literally "how can I render a markdown file", which I really can't believe we don't have a duplicate for? Jan 11 at 20:07
  • 3
    @TylerH: How is that question not about Github? It mentions Github 3 times and it is tagged Github. Using a different tool than Github itself for the preview is pointless, since Github displays it differently than other tools. This is only about Github and all other answers are incorrect. Why? Because "a readme for my GitHub project" is the README.md file which is always displayed by Github automatically when visiting the project. Jan 11 at 21:26
  • 12
    BTW, I think that's a really good question, because I have committed a readme several times in order to fix it, just because my markdown editors render it differently. I would really like to be able to preview my readmes exactly as rendered by Github, not by VS Code, not PyCharm and other JetBrains tools, not Typora, not Marktext. Github does it differently. Jan 12 at 0:05

7 Answers 7

21

I closed and locked it. Another moderator had closed it some time back, but the community reopened it.

Part of the problem here is that it had degenerated into "Just use this tool!" responses. I trimmed some dead and duplicate links, then closed and locked it.

There's no easy fix to the "best answer is #5" (my only tooling option is to delete all the answers above it, which is a terrible solution). I agree it's an unfortunate one. I'm not deeply wedded to the idea of locking it, but neither am I OK with this collecting link lint (as it did yesterday) when some members of the community decided to reopen it.

I'm open to suggestions.

EDIT

I have unlocked, reopened, and protected the question. I also removed answers in keeping with this comment from RyanM

I think the answers need to be something more than just recommending a Markdown editor/renderer. It should be somehow specific to GitHub (e.g., specifically rendering GitHub-flavored Markdown, built into a tool officially supported by GitHub such as VS Code, in the GitHub UI, etc.) and include that information in the answer (as opposed to, say "In the web, use [name of tool]. It's awesome."). That would remove most or all of the lower-quality answers.

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  • 15
    "Link lint" is such an excellent term for this phenomenon. We should all clean out our pockets. Jan 10 at 15:36
  • 8
    We could just delete all the answers that simply recommend tools. That would leave... this answer and this answer, with all others being deleted. That would solve OP's concern about ideal non-rec answers being buried. Then it could remain locked.
    – TylerH
    Jan 10 at 15:36
  • 3
    At the very least there are multiple newer repeats of the 'use the GitHub editor' solution that need to be deleted.
    – TylerH
    Jan 10 at 15:38
  • 4
    delete it so there's no question whether or not it should be locked.
    – Kevin B
    Jan 10 at 15:39
  • 3
    If we're certain best answer is #5 edit in a link to the answer at the bottom of the question.
    – Joshua
    Jan 10 at 15:57
  • 2
    @Joshua That's... not a terrible idea. Trim the link-only answers and apply an edit-only lock instead
    – Machavity Mod
    Jan 10 at 16:08
  • 4
    "I'm open to suggestions." Delete the not so useful answers? Jan 10 at 17:14
  • Sugg: Keep the Thread locked, but close it as a Duplicate of a newly to be created clean/concise/scoped (Wiki) Q&A... :idea:
    – chivracq
    Jan 10 at 18:14
  • 3
    I doubt a newly created question would be all that useful. "How do i preview markdown in github's editor?" -> "by clicking preview..." the value that people found in the current question is the recommendation nature of it.
    – Kevin B
    Jan 10 at 18:20
  • 9
    Asking about "software tools commonly used by programmers" is specifically On-Topic on SO. Jan 11 at 0:14
  • 9
    Unlock, Reopen and Leave as is. Trending votes would eventually take the newer answers to the top. Locking this post especially, when the meta effect in play, robs the more-correct answers of the exposure needed.
    – TheMaster
    Jan 11 at 9:56
  • 7
    @DavidC.Rankin No. The question must specifically also be about a practical, answerable problem that is unique to software development. This is explicitly spelled out in the Help Center and the interpretation of that "and" has been clarified many times on Meta. Programmers commonly use any number of software tools, the ordinary use of which clearly has nothing to do with programming. It's just like how we take questions about shell scripting, but not about individual command-line invocations, unless they're practically a DSL (like with ffmpeg) or needed to install something. Jan 12 at 2:34
  • Less radical suggestion: Add h2 headers to the top of every answer, including the github official way. (Some answers already have them). This just makes it easier to scroll and see the different suggestions, without having to read/parse the rest of the answer. I have done this before on Arqade occasionally - Ex 1 (basically the same situation - multiple answers and voting not helping the sorting), Ex 2, multiple answers following question merges for different versions and situations.
    – Robotnik
    Jan 12 at 4:36
  • 1
    FYI, in response to your edit: Mou does not document support for GH-flavoured MD ("GFM"). The info I found says that Atom doesn't support GFM, and I know for a fact that VS Code's buitin Markdown preview doesn't support several features of GFM, such as task list items. That hits the current top three answers... and yet they're still up?
    – user
    Jan 23 at 6:26
26

This is a valid on-topic question for Stack Overflow, that's not explicitly seeking recommendations, and which can currently be answered using just the tool under discussion.

Barring exceptional circumstances, non-duplicate questions that meet the site's criteria for inclusion should not be closed.

Setting aside for the moment how or whether it should be locked or cleaned up, this question should at minimum be reopened.


Additional points to address some common concerns raised.

On-topic

Per "What topics can I ask about here?" in the Stack Overflow help center:

if your question generally covers […] software tools commonly used by programmers; and is a practical, answerable problem that is unique to software development, then you’re in the right place to ask your question!

This question meets all the above criteria:

  1. GitHub is a software tool commonly used by programmers. The question is specifically about the display of the readme.md, which is a file GitHub has special handling for, so the file being edited is directly related to GitHub and not an incidental markdown file.

    You can add a README file to a repository to communicate important information about your project. A README […] communicates expectations for your project and helps you manage contributions.

    […]

    A README is often the first item a visitor will see when visiting your repository.

    […]

    If you put your README file in your repository's hidden .github, root, or docs directory, GitHub will recognize and automatically surface your README to repository visitors.

  2. This is a practical, not theoretical question, as it asks how to accomplish a specific goal.

  3. This is an answerable problem. There are ways to achieve the goal, some of which are posted as answers to the question.

  4. This problem is unique to software development, or unique enough to qualify for inclusion. While it is possible to use GitHub for non-software projects, its primary use is for developing software. And as mentioned above, this is specifically dealing with the REAMDE.md file, which typically contains documentation about the software being developed.

Recommendation question?

As noted in various comments on this question, recommendation questions are off-topic:

Questions asking us to recommend or find a book, tool, software library, tutorial or other off-site resource are off-topic for Stack Overflow as they tend to attract opinionated answers and spam. Instead, describe the problem and what has been done so far to solve it.

As currently stated, I would not classify this as a recommendation question.

Markdown-based readme files have built-in, first-class support in GitHub. They're displayed as rendered information about the project or the current directory being viewed.

Since the question is specifically about core built-in GitHub functionality, that can be solved with core built-in GitHub functionality, this can fully be answered within the GitHub tool without needing additional tools. And even if it couldn't be solved within GitHub, "No, this is not a built-in feature of GitHub" would be a reasonable and useful answer to this question.

Software development question?

Arguments have been made that this is not a question unique to software development. The key argument has been that it's about display of Markdown, and that rendering of Markdown isn't unique to developing software.

First, this question is specifically about the display of the README file for the project:

I am writing a readme for my GitHub project in the .md format. Is there a way can I test what my readme.md file will look like before committing to GitHub?

As I mentioned above, the project README file is a key part of documenting information about the software project, with first-class support within the GitHub tool. Knowing how the documentation is being rendered is very much a software development question.

I personally would also argue that Markdown is close enough to software development that questions about it should be allowed on Stack Overflow, for the same reason that HTML or templating questions are. It's source code that's processed by the computer to produce a result. Being able to preview the rendered result is a key part of development with such a language.

9
  • 2
    "This question meets all the above criteria." - no, it does not. It's very obvious that it does not, and I can't understand why so many people agree with this and are willing to knee-jerk downvote the clear logic to the contrary. Jan 12 at 2:16
  • 4
    @KarlKnechtel "It's very obvious that it does not [meet all the above criteria]." — It is a software tool commonly used by programmers. It is a practical question. It is answerable. GitHub is unique to software development (or at least, primarily used for it enough to qualify). Which of these criteria does it not meet? It does not seem obvious to me at all that it does not meet all the above criteria, and I don't see how you could conclude such.
    – M. Justin
    Jan 12 at 3:22
  • 3
    "GitHub is unique to software development (or at least, primarily used for it enough to qualify)." That is irrelevant, because the question is not about using GitHub. It is about using a document that is written in a particular format. And documents in that format can certainly be used in places that are not GitHub. The phrasing of the question explicitly asked about previewing the document before putting it on GitHub, even. (Which is why some people disagree with OP's selection of the "best" answer being the one referring to the built-in preview.) Jan 12 at 4:06
  • 2
    Whereas I'd say it's about previewing the document before viewing it as the project info page in GitHub. i.e. making sure it's fit to publish in the software development tool GitHub before the software project's description is viewable to everyone with access to that particular project in GitHub.
    – M. Justin
    Jan 12 at 4:18
  • 1
    "Whereas I'd say it's about previewing the document before viewing it as the project info page in GitHub." - yes, exactly. And because previewing a document doesn't depend on where it will be published, it's not a question about that destination. Jan 12 at 4:18
  • 4
    @KarlKnechtel GitHub uses its own flavour of markdown, so the question is rather specific to that platform. The real question IMO is whether the proven disregard of answers to this fact also reflects back on the question itself. Jan 12 at 6:11
  • 6
    @KarlKnechtel it is distinctly NOT "obvious that is does not" meet 'all the above criteria'. I've been here since the Beta days. And think it obviously meets question requirements. You apparently think it does not. That someone who has been here for 13 years thinks the opposite of someone who's been here for 15 shows just how INobvious this question must be. Favoring leaving a question open vs closed and unlocked vs locked is the smart decision.
    – warren
    Jan 12 at 15:11
  • Convenient how the "obvious" or "smart" choice when there's a dispute is the side one agrees with.
    – Kevin B
    Jan 12 at 17:43
  • Added to my "additional points" section — Expanded why it's on topic; addressed why it's a software development question
    – M. Justin
    Jan 12 at 20:03
8

I personally apply a "value test" when I come across questions like these, which as its name suggests basically goes along the lines of:

Is this question, and its answer(s), likely to be of significant value to future visitors to Stack Overflow?

And in this case the answer is a resounding "no". The question itself is 12 years old and the answer that says "this is baked into Github's UI now" is only 2 years newer; that's an eternity in software development terms. So long, in fact, that Github's own documentation - which is the first search result for "github markdown preview" - explicitly mentions the "preview" feature. While I'm aware that Stack Overflow wants all the SEO juice, I don't see any value in directing people to a question and answer that basically says "it's built in" when users can just go directly to Github's own docs to get the same information - especially since those docs can reasonably be assumed to be the most up-to-date source for information about their own product.

Note that the above would be my view of this question even if its only answer was the single correct one. Bad questions attract bad answers, and this question has attracted a lot of the latter, which only strengthens my belief that it's inherently poor.

Not everything that's nominally on topic, is suitable for Stack Overflow.

8
  • 10
    Github's own documentation - which is the first search result for "github markdown preview" - I just copy-pasted "github markdown preview" onto Google in private browsing, and although I kept scrolling down and clicking the "see more results" buttons, I haven't been able to find that Github page. I guess I just picked the short straw today. (Edit: if anyone else is reading this comment and actually has it as a first result, it means you're luckier than I am, because search engines always tailor the search results depending on where you live and many other factors).
    – Clockwork
    Jan 11 at 8:31
  • 10
    Alternatively, in this particular case, a question I might ask is "If this were posted for the first time today, would we keep it around?" In this case, I think the answer would be "yes". It would be a very basic question from a newbie user who wasn't aware of the built-in support for markdown viewing, and should have an equally basic answer of "It's built into the tool. Here's how you use it." It's the sort of question that would have value to someone just starting out with the tool, but be obviously basic/skippable for those with experience.
    – M. Justin
    Jan 11 at 16:34
  • 3
    @Clockwork I don't know what to tell you. I tried copying and pasting github markdown preview into DuckDuckGo, in an incognito window (although this shouldn't matter for DDG), and the first result I got was https://docs.github.com/articles/markdown-basics, which redirects to the logical parent of what Ian linked. The third result was exactly what Ian linked. I used to say "this is easy to search for; you don't even need to use Google" - but maybe I should start actively advising against using Google, on more than ideological grounds. Jan 12 at 2:22
  • 1
    "because search engines always tailor the search results depending on where you live and many other factors" - if you believe DuckDuckGo, they only do basic localization of results, and even then only on an opt-in basis. Jan 12 at 2:24
  • 1
    "In this case, I think the answer would be "yes". It would be a very basic question from a newbie user who wasn't aware of the built-in support for markdown viewing, and should have an equally basic answer of "It's built into the tool. Here's how you use it." - have you tried using this editor? The Preview button is right there. Jan 12 at 2:27
  • 4
    @KarlKnechtel "have you tried using this editor?" There are a lot of developers who may have experience with command-line Git, but not with using GitHub. As such a user, the fact that there even is an editor, let alone one with Markdown preview support, could well be surprising.
    – M. Justin
    Jan 12 at 4:01
  • 3
    You don't need experience with github to understand how tabs in a browser works.
    – Kevin B
    Jan 12 at 4:05
  • 2
    @KarlKnechtel Yeah, I seem to have an easier time finding that page on DuckDuckGo. Now, here's the funny thing: a few months ago, some people on Travel Stack Exchange were "arguing" with me over the usage of a US acronym in an answer, because "everyone knows what it means" (except me apparently). The expected result was the name of a garage or something, but when I searched for that acronym, I kept stumbling on random companies. The other persons argued that I must be using Bing (when in fact I was using DuckDuckGo and Google; it's just that I don't live in the US, so no US based results).
    – Clockwork
    Jan 12 at 7:42
2

Converted from a comment upon request:


Radical suggestion:

Delete the answers that simply link to/spruik about individual tools, and create a Community Wiki post that captures the crux of those answers - just the external tool name and how do use it in context. You can add a disclaimer into the answer about how this is the most commonly recommended external tools if you feel it will help as well.

The side-effect of making it a new CW answer, is that it will have 0 votes and thus be ranked lower than the Github official way.

1
  • Delete the other answer too and just put them all in one CW mega answer, then apply a wiki lock. Problem solved.
    – TylerH
    Jan 19 at 21:25
-4

When people ask for a software tool or library rather than asking how to write the code themselves, I typically tell them that it's excellent software engineering practice to reuse existing code, but it's not something SO encourages. I suggest to them that they should write the question as if they plan to write the code themselves, and if it turns out there's a library to save them the trouble, someone will respond saying so.

What's particularly damaging about SO's disparagement of questions asking for tools or libraries is the notion that choosing a tool or library is a matter of opinion (whereas presumably writing the code yourself isn't). Now it's true that such questions do attract opinion-based answers, but that's generally (a) because the questions don't give enough information about requirements to enable an objective assessment, and (b) because responders typically have positive experiences of some tools and negative experiences of others, and make their recommendations based on these experiences. But these factors apply just as much to code-based answers.

2
  • 1
    I agree, and this lines up pretty nicely with meta.stackoverflow.com/a/386006/11107541, but how is this relevant to the discussion here? the question did not ask for tool recommendations. It asked how to achieve a goal.
    – user
    Jan 12 at 17:57
  • 3
    This answer seems simply off-topic here, as it's trying to challenge a general policy rather than considering whether the policy applies to the [specific-question]. Jan 12 at 19:51
-5

I endorse the moderator decision to close and lock the post. This is exactly the kind of content that is better dealt with via a historical lock than by trying to get it deleted. But it blatantly does not meet site standards, would not have for many years, and could not feasibly be fixed (whether or not GitHub had actually implemented a preview feature).

Clearly off-topic

People have repeatedly argued with me in the comments and been supported for it, despite the fact that we've had this discussion before. I'm going to spell it out as clearly as I know how.

but if your question generally covers…

  • a specific programming problem, or
  • a software algorithm, or
  • software tools commonly used by programmers; and is
  • a practical, answerable problem that is unique to software development

I set the important parts in bold. An on-topic question needs to meet at least one of the first three criteria and must also meet the fourth criterion of being unique to software development. That is, we don't care about the motivation of the person asking the question. We care about the non-existence of an ordinary motivation that is outside of software development.

"How do I preview Markdown?" clearly fails this test. The document itself is not software, and Markdown text clearly is written for reasons that have nothing to do with software - for example, to use on a personal blog, or to post on Reddit, or to ask or answer a question on a non-programming related Stack Exchange site.

Yes, GitHub has its own "flavour" of Markdown. This does not rescue the question, any more than "what image editors support XYZ format?" becomes a programming question because ABC framework requires images in that format. The term "Markdown" is commonly known to describe a family of slight variants on a basic idea, and anyone would naturally expect a Markdown document previewer to be able to handle several such variants (and perhaps even have some kind of extension/plugin mechanism for more) - unless it were built specifically for purpose, such as a preview built right in to a website.

Clearly a recommendation question

At the time the question was asked, there was apparently no preview built in to GitHub. It would be absurd to ask the question if there had been.

Given the absence of such a preview, the question can only reasonably be interpreted as a request to identify a tool that could preview the document.

It can't have been intended as "how do I use Markdown viewer X to view a Markdown document?" because a) it would again be absurd without identifying a specific problem and b) it would have to identify a specific Markdown viewer to make sense. But even then, it would still fundamentally be a question about the ordinary use of a program that can be used by non-programmers, and the fact that the OP intended to publish something on GitHub would not actually matter to the question.

The interpretation as "how do I create a Markdown viewer?" is unreasonable given how the question was answered. If people had understood it that way, then it would have been blatantly too broad ("Needs More Focus" today).

Clearly does not have enduring value

As noted, the site has a preview function now, and has apparently had one at least since that one answer was written - which was close to 10 years ago. Yet, other answers recommending an external tool got added after that one, and some even became more popular - apparently because people are treating it as a generic "recommend me a Markdown viewer" question. One of those was added all the way in 2017, and even explicitly says that the recommended tool does not support GitHub-flavoured Markdown! Granted, it appears this context was added by someone who had written one of the other answers - but that answer is also recommending using the Markdown view support built into a different IDE. So that just makes it even clearer that everyone ended up treating the question as a place to make competing proposals for Markdown viewing tools based on whatever arbitrary criteria of the answerers' choosing.

So not only is that an off-topic recommendation question; it's showcasing the exact problems that are why we disallow such questions by policy.

14
  • 2
    your very first comment said that the question isn't seeking recommendations. now you say it's clearly a recommendation question? I think at least the answer about using GitHub's API to render the markdown as GitHub's own website does is clearly of lasting value.
    – user
    Jan 12 at 2:21
  • 5
    When I wrote the comment, I meant that the question itself was not explicitly written to solicit recommendations. However, the evidence given by the answers shows that it cannot reasonably be interpreted in other ways - or at least, other interpretations would fail in other ways. " I think at least the answer about using GitHub's API to render the markdown as GitHub's own website does is clearly of lasting value." - I would endorse such a new question with that specific focus, if it is not a duplicate. Jan 12 at 2:29
  • 6
    The question: "I am writing a readme for my GitHub project in the .md format. Is there a way can I test what my readme.md file will look like before committing to GitHub?" This is specifically about the readme that GitHub specifically displays at the root of the Git repo, and how it would then be displayed on GitHub. It is not a general-purpose "what does the Markdown look like" question, but rather a tool-specific "How can I tell what my GitHub project page will look like without having to create a commit for the potential change" question. That context is unique to software development.
    – M. Justin
    Jan 12 at 4:07
  • 5
    "I am writing a readme for my GitHub project in the .md format. Is there a way can I test what my readme.md file will look like before committing to GitHub?" This is specifically asking about the readme file" - no; "the .md" format can be used for many things. The fact that OP specifically wanted to use it in this context is not relevant. Jan 12 at 4:09
  • 6
    "The fact that OP specifically wanted to use it in this context is not relevant." Whereas I feel that the context in which it is used is specific to software development is supremely relevant. It's analogous "How can I preview my Markdown file in IntelliJ IDEA"; IDEA is a tool used primarily for software development, so a question on how to use it to achieve one of its purposes would be on topic.
    – M. Justin
    Jan 12 at 4:13
  • 4
    Like I already explained in the answer, if someone were asking specifically about how to do it in a specific IDE, it would be a question about that IDE. But this is not a question about GitHub, because OP was not specifically interested in using GitHub to do the previewing. Just like how, if I have a question about code that I'm writing to pad my resume, it doesn't become a question about job searching. Jan 12 at 4:16
  • 4
    "The document itself is not software" — But the README.md file specifically asked about in the question is part of software — it's the publicly visible documentation of the software for that particular GitHub project.
    – M. Justin
    Jan 12 at 4:40
  • 4
    "a recommendation question" This section feels like the strongest argument to me. But it really doesn’t benefit from being lumped together with the others, and especially not by all of them being branded as "Clearly"; if that were the case, we clearly would not be discussing this. Perhaps you might want to split this answer or tone it down a bit. Jan 12 at 6:21
  • 4
    About "An on-topic question [...] must also meet the fourth criterion of being unique to software development": what about a question asking how to exit Vim? 5000+ upvotes, around 3.000.000 views. There was even a blog post when it reached one million views. But Vim can be used for everything, not only for development: shall we close that question too? And close all the other questions about Vim, while we are at it? Jan 12 at 13:58
  • @FabiosaysReinstateMonica there seem to be different views about whether and which vi/vim questions are still on-topic here since the creation of the vi/vim site. see or example meta.stackoverflow.com/a/401027/11107541 (mod answer in 2020 with 50 score) and meta.stackoverflow.com/a/287108/11107541 (answer in 2015 with 36 score)
    – user
    Jan 12 at 18:06
  • 5
    To be clear, if this was a general "How do I preview Markdown files?" question, I would probably agree that this is not a suitable question for this site (since that is very close to being a general tool recommendation question). I feel this is fit for the site as it's specifically asking about GitHub (a tool used primarily for software development), and about a specific Markdown file (README.md) that has special meaning and handling within the context of GitHub and which has a specific software dev meaning (project documentation). The fact that it has an in-tool answer further cements it.
    – M. Justin
    Jan 12 at 18:45
  • 1
    So, effectively, because it was tagged GitHub, you feel it’s fine, because it’s supporting a specific company rather than being the general endpoint people looking for how to preview markdown generally have been reaching for 12 years. Deleting a bunch of recommendations for alternatives to make it serve a specific purpose rather than the one it’s been serving, just so it can be saved for… reasons… seems like a loss for everyone involved. It being locked as it is is likely the only reasonable outcome that doesn’t destroy what has been useful content.
    – Kevin B
    Jan 12 at 19:01
  • 3
    @KevinB The question isn’t just tagged for GitHub, both its title and body explicitly reference this scope; what else would you feel is needed to not make this scope dismissible? All those suggestions for other flavours have been missing the question literally since day one. Jan 12 at 21:49
  • 3
    @MisterMiyagi i don't disagree that the question is explicit in targeting github; what i disagree with is pretending the question wasn't obviously used as a reference for far more than what the original question intended and just deleting/actioning against all other answers, 12 years later. The question should have been corrected a long time ago, back when an answer to it would have been useful.
    – Kevin B
    Jan 12 at 21:54
-6

I'm going to play devil's advocate for a moment, and raise something that appears to have been danced around a bit. I think it's a reasonable consideration, but not one that I ultimately agree with. I'm putting this up to see the community up/downvote consensus. I'm not editing it into my existing answer since I don't want to change the meaning/focus of something that 23 people have already weighed in on with their votes.

This question is too basic and its answer is too obvious for Stack Overflow

The question and other answers have argued that while this question may be on-topic, it's not particularly useful due to being clearly documented by GitHub and has resulted in a lot of undesirable recommendation answers. It seems that the reason for this is that GitHub did not have a built-in preview feature when it was created, so the context in which the question was originally asked caused answers to tend toward tool recommendations. However, the current state of the tool (with preview support) means that there is trivial in-tool support for this.

Let's say this question were asked today, without the historical baggage. For context, here's the question as it currently exists:

I am writing a readme for my GitHub project in the .md format. Is there a way can I test what my readme.md file will look like before committing to GitHub?

One could argue that Markdown preview support is too basic and too obvious in the UI to warrant being a useful question. The edit button and preview button are both very clear and standard, so there is negligible value having this be a Q&A on Stack Overflow.

Edit button

GitHub UI showing the "edit" button

Preview button

GitHub UI showing the "preview" button

1
  • 7
    "This question is too basic and its answer is too obvious" - that isn't a reason to exclude questions here. It only becomes a problem if that "obvious" nature makes it "unlikely to help others" (as in the wording for the "not reproducible or caused by a typo" closure reason). Jan 12 at 4:43

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