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Why are goGTK widgets not initialized in init() function

This question is clearly 'about programming' and should not be closed. Why was it closed?

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    Why did you feel the need to delete that question 3 times?
    – Thom A
    Commented Jan 9 at 17:08
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    If you feel that it should be reopened, then you should vote to reopen it, which you have not (no one has, yet).
    – Makyen Mod
    Commented Jan 9 at 17:18
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    Unfortunately, I don't have time to look into this in detail at the moment. The closed-question post notice which is being shown is the general banner that indicates there wasn't agreement between the three close voters as to which site-specific reason to use when closing the question. The close voters each selected a different site-specific close reason, which results, unfortunately, in the generic post-notice instead of listing all three reasons. The question has been edited and submitted to the reopen queue, where it should, eventually, be reviewed by other users.
    – Makyen Mod
    Commented Jan 9 at 17:19
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    @ThomA - because the number of unexplained downvotes increased every time I restored it.
    – Vector
    Commented Jan 9 at 17:19
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    General advice: Go through the site specific close reasons and verify that your edits make it such that none of those reasons apply. The close votes were, of course, cast on earlier versions of the question and may reflect issues that existed in earlier versions which you have already resolved. Given that it's self-answered, verify that enough information is in the question for some other subject mater expert to get from just the information in the question to the answer you've provided. This last part is usually difficult, as there's often a lot of context which only you are aware of.
    – Makyen Mod
    Commented Jan 9 at 17:21
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    Re "Why was it closed?": It baffles me too. No, really. Commented Jan 9 at 18:04
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    Unexplained downvotes? The tooltip is always present, whether you deleted the question previously or not.
    – Thom A
    Commented Jan 9 at 18:24
  • @ThomA - but the question is not as visible.
    – Vector
    Commented Jan 9 at 18:27
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    That doesn't really answer why you deleted it then; so why did you delete it 3 times? That isn't helpful and, from a user who attempts to answer questions, is actually incredibly counter productive; it's very frustrating as I go to comment for clarification, can't (as they deleted it while I was authoring), then when they undelete I go to comment and the same happens again... If you need to improve the question, just use the edit feature; don't go deleting and undeleting over and over. Your behaviour might actually attract downvotes as you frustrate users trying to help you.
    – Thom A
    Commented Jan 9 at 18:32
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    "Because the number of unexplained downvotes increased every time I restored it." - The most straightforward way to avoid downvotes is not to delete questions that can be answered. It is incredibly frustrating to perform research on a question to answer it, only for the author to delete it. Wasting my time, while not specifically listed as a reason for a downvote, while not explicitly listed, could be covered by the "not well-researched." reason. Commented Jan 9 at 18:36
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  • @SecurityHound - The question had been closed when most of my deletes were done.
    – Vector
    Commented Jan 9 at 19:21
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    "The question had been closed when most of my deletes were done." - sorry, but this claim does not hold water. Closures, deletion and edits are precisely timestamped in the post's history, although votes are not. Commented Jan 9 at 19:25
  • The last vote was made after the deletes; the history doesn't state when the other votes occured, @Vector (we only know when the last one occurs because the question is closed).
    – Thom A
    Commented Jan 9 at 19:26

1 Answer 1

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Regarding your query here

It appears from the question timeline view that the closure of this question was controversial. Close votes were invalidated in the review queue three times before the question was actually closed.

It appears - although I cannot directly access this information - that the people voting to close, disagreed about the reason for closure (or they identified multiple issues). It appears that currently this results in the closure banner having this generic "not about programming", that comes from the Stack Exchange software defaults. This may be considered a bug related to the change to requiring 3 votes to close a question (versus 5 before the change).

For clarity: the banner on your question reads (for me):

Closed. This question does not meet Stack Overflow guidelines. It is not currently accepting answers.

This question does not appear to be about programming within the scope defined in the help center.

But the banner on a question that actually was closed for the explicit "off-topic" reason will instead read:

Closed. This question is not about programming or software development. It is not currently accepting answers.

This question does not appear to be about a specific programming problem, a software algorithm, or software tools primarily used by programmers. If you believe the question would be on-topic on another Stack Exchange site, you can leave a comment to explain where the question may be able to be answered.

This may or may not appear different for the person who actually asked the question (I can't readily check this without abusing the system by intentionally asking an unsuitable question).


My personal opinion of your question - as it currently stands as of this writing - is that it still needs details or clarity - specifically, clarity. The issue is that the question's use of "initialized" (and especially "properly initialized") is vague - per the comment exchange, it appears that the function does get called and that its purpose is still "initialization", this just doesn't have the specific consequences that you expect it to have. It's also not clear why or how talking about either C++ or Object Pascal is supposed to clarify your expectation, and it makes the question tend to come across more as a rant ("why doesn't this $^@# language work properly? Other languages can get this simple thing right!").

Rather than describe the problem as a failure of initialization, I would focus on making sure there is a truly minimal MRE, and then asking about a specific behavioural expectation that is violated (i.e.: a specific variable should have this value at such and such a point in the program, but it has a garbage value instead), or especially a consequent error (such as a segfault resulting from the program later on trying to use a pointer with an uninitialized value). Show your debugging results (was init() in fact called, according to the debugger? Was it called at the point in time you expected it to be? If it was called, did it successfully return? After being called and returning successfully, was the program state as you expected?); and explain the problem purely in its own terms, without referring to analogous constructs in other languages or using other frameworks.

Regarding your conduct WRT the main-space question

As mentioned in the comments here and as I verified from the question timeline, you deleted and undeleted this question multiple times without anything we'd consider a reasonable justification.

Please keep in mind that users are not required to explain their downvotes, by design. Trying to clear away "unexplained" downvotes, or ones that you consider unjustified, etc. is generally considered an abuse of the system. However, deleting and restoring a question won't have this effect anyway. It only prevents votes from being cast while the question is being deleted - including potential upvotes. While it's understandable that someone who asked a poor question might want to block voting while improving the question (which might take some effort), it appears that you only edited the question (many times) while it was not deleted.

Repeatedly deleting and restoring a question is also likely to annoy other users who come across the question and want to help. This could make them more inclined to downvote the question as a punitive measure. Of course, this is pure speculation on my part; everyone is entitled to use their votes as they see fit - the system is democratic by nature.

Aside from that, the comments here indicate that you had some technical issue with the site that caused you to post the question from a new account. It is never appropriate to discuss such matters within the question. Such meta commentary is off-topic noise in questions that is subject to immediate removal (by other users editing it). If you need to understand how to use a site feature, or figure out e.g. how to merge accounts or what to do about an accidental account creation, Meta is the place to ask (or research); if you have an idiosyncratic issue that requires personalized support, contact support directly. But definitely do not talk about how you are an experienced user, for the same reason that newbies (whether they are new to the site, or to the programming language, or to programming in general) should not talk about that: in principle we don't care who is asking the question. We care about the question itself, and judge the question on its own merits.

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  • and it makes the question tend to come across more as a rant ("why doesn't this $^@# language work properly? Other languages can get this simple thing right!") No such intent - it was merely to add context - 'where I am coming from'.
    – Vector
    Commented Jan 9 at 19:29
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    I understand that, but I am explaining that such a perception could be created. This context doesn't help understand the question: it doesn't tell us anything more specific about your expectation for "initialization" than the term does by itself. Commented Jan 9 at 19:30
  • Just FYI: The system doesn't permit users to edit their own question while it's deleted, if they are the one who deleted it. [OTOH, answers can be edited by the author when the author deleted them.] So, while a user could work on what they want to change in their question while it's deleted, perhaps needing to use an external editor, the author would be unable to apply the edit on SO/SE until after the question was undeleted (when they are the one that deleted their question).
    – Makyen Mod
    Commented Jan 9 at 19:51
  • @KarlKnechtel - if someone doesn't understand what initialization means in that context, they will have nothing worthwhile to say about that question, and will certainly not be able to provide a useful answer or comment.
    – Vector
    Commented Jan 9 at 20:07
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    " if someone doesn't understand what initialization means in that context, they will have nothing worthwhile to say about that question, and will certainly not be able to provide a useful answer or comment." - then why did you bother to mention anything about C++ or Object Pascal? Why is that context useful, if we expect that "initialization" is already well enough understood? Commented Jan 9 at 20:10
  • @KarlKnechtel - then why did you bother to mention anything about C++ or Object Pascal - as explained. context . Is this Q&A or an interrogation?
    – Vector
    Commented Jan 9 at 21:52
  • @KarlKnechtel Regarding your query here ; Regarding your conduct WRT the main-space question : Please avoid personal references. It is unprofessional - you are a moderator, not a judge or a police officer.
    – Vector
    Commented Jan 9 at 22:03
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    @Vector Karl is not a moderator. Commented Jan 10 at 0:38
  • @AndreasmovedtoCodidact - all the more reason why he should desist from his ridiculous, rude behavior.
    – Vector
    Commented Jan 10 at 0:46
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    @GrumpyGramps I am open to suggestions for better section headings. Commented Jan 10 at 0:58
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    He spends quite some effort in writing up a long answer to help you out, and you call him rude over it. Classical. Why would anyone bother helping you when you respond like that? Commented Jan 10 at 6:01
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    "Please avoid personal references." This is your question. Your authorship. Your contribution we are talking about; how can "your" be unprofessional here, when we are discussing actions you have taken or actions the community has taken as a result of your actions? The word "your" isn't being used as an attack, it's merely the correct pronoun.
    – Thom A
    Commented Jan 10 at 8:47
  • On the main site, I am very careful about avoiding personal language, even if I don't think it could possibly be read as an attack. The Q&A format is fundamentally impersonal; it's supposed to be about the question, not the people asking or answering. However, on Meta, there is a clear expectation that the questions and answers are really a discussion hammered into that Q&A format, which revolves around some specific example or incident. Even more so when the question has tags like [specific-question]. Commented Jan 12 at 2:45

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