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Introduction

Stack Overflow is designed in such a way that negative ratings are easy to give and anonymous - this is the core principle of the site and should indeed be treated as an axiom. I don't want to undermine this in any way, and if you got that impression from the rest of this question, that wasn't my intention.

However, it seems to me that at some point we threw the baby out with the bathwater. Stack Overflow is indeed a very difficult place to ask questions for inexperienced people. And we can't change that - we can't expect someone just entering the world of programming to formulate their question so well that it would be perfectly suitable for placement in a global knowledge library. And in this case, negative votes do indeed serve their purpose. However, the ease of giving negative votes has led to even experienced content creators fearing to share their own case studies. And this is not an isolated case. I have also experienced this myself. Yet Stack Overflow moderators directly encourage creating self-answered questions!

Suggestion

I understand that the Stack Exchange team doesn't want to change the way the voting system works. And that's okay. There are very strong arguments behind this. But what if there was a place where people could share their draft question-with-answer without fear of negative votes? A place where we present a suggestions for a self-answered questions. In this place, there would be no possibility of negative votes and reputation awards would be completely disabled. So only discussion would be allowed in case the question lacks something important. All the self-answered questions could be edited by community under the same rules as regular questions and answers on Stack Overflow. Moderation would also still exist (i.e. flagging, close voting etc.). The author of the suggestion decides himself when the suggestion should be posted as an official question on Stack Overflow.

Such pages with suggestions for self-answered questions wouldn't even have to be indexed by search engines, so there's no fear that we would clutter the site. It would simply be a place to gather constructive criticism and "polish" the text before sharing one's case-study of a solved problem. Posting such a suggestion would be completely voluntary. You could still post directly self-answered question to SO.

I know that there is already a Community wiki, so there is no fear of losing reputation. However, in my opinion, it does not work. Even if a creator of self-answered question is only driven by the desire to gain reputation, what's wrong with that? Let them do it. Writing a good question and answer takes a lot of time. If the only way to reward their work and say "thank you" is the +10 they see, then let's give them that opportunity. If a person is on Stack Overflow solely to build credibility for their portfolio, let them do that too, as long as they provide really good and valuable content. I don't see anything wrong with that. It's a win-win.

However, if a person, who builds such a portfolio has to risk a "random" (from their perspective) negative votes on their case-study, only to be frustrated that they "wasted" hours of their work, they certainly won't write it on Stack Overflow. They will be discouraged and write it on Medium, their own blog, etc. If Stack Overflow is to be the largest encyclopedia of valuable Q&As, then let's do everything to make it so! Let's encourage (or rather not discourage) creators to publish self-answered questions. Let's help them create questions of the highest standard, without the "-1" frustration.

Besides, a place for such question quality validation has an additional advantage: We don't "bury" questions with downvotes that are fundamentally good but just need polishing. I don't know what your experience is. But if I spent 2 hours really polishing a question and answer in accordance with the site's standards (being 100% sure that I haven't duplicated another question from SO), and seeing only "-2" an hour after publishing, without any comment, then I don't feel like guessing what went wrong. I feel like deleting the question and never contributing to the site again because I felt that my contribution was not only unwanted but even unwelcome. I'm not saying that's always the case. I know the meaning of downvotes is different. I'm just describing the typical thought process of a person who wanted to add value to the site, and there's a good chance they will never do it again simply because of a bad user experience.

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    It seems to me that most of this proposal would amount to something already covered by the Staging Ground. We just need to keep poking the company towards making it public.
    – E_net4
    Dec 13, 2023 at 13:43
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    I don't see how this proposal is unique to self-Q&A. It's what every question can benefit from, even if it doesn't contain an answer. As E_net4 said, it's also technically under way as the Staging Ground. Seems recently the progress there has slowed: Is the Staging Ground (un)officially abandoned?
    – VLAZ
    Dec 13, 2023 at 13:51
  • 2
    It's likely not exactly what you are looking for, but chat has rooms for many popular languages/frameworks. Those should have the right audience for discussing how to ask a question in a specific tag, possibly with a self-answer as well. Dec 13, 2023 at 13:59
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    A more succinct proposal would help. I'm pretty sure I disagree... but I find this boring to read, and difficult to follow.
    – yivi
    Dec 13, 2023 at 14:01
  • As already hinted by VLAZ, part of the proposal is based on false premises. This question was linked to suggest that self-answered questions are often downvoted, but the second answer with the highest score at the moment indicates that "none of the reasons [for downvoting] are because they are self answered". Overall, most askers could probably benefit from a staging ground, regardless of whether they're self-answering the question.
    – E_net4
    Dec 13, 2023 at 14:33
  • @VLAZ, My proposal is unique to self-answered questions and not all questions, because I believe the author's goal in these two cases is completely different. When asking a question, the author mainly wants to get an answer, and whether their question is downvoted or not is secondary, as long as they get satisfactory help. No frustrations here. In the case of self-answered questions, the author's main goal is to provide content that will be well-received by the community. These are two completely different goals. And in my opinion, the latter is discriminated against in the current system.
    – Reveson
    Dec 13, 2023 at 14:52
  • @E_net4, Regarding the fact that it's not true that self-answered questions are more often downvoted than others - that's true, but it's not important.The problem is the very fact of downvotes without feedback on content which the author might not even care to publish, because they already know the answer. If we really (!) want the authors to publish self-answered questions, we need to give them a supportive environment.
    – Reveson
    Dec 13, 2023 at 14:57
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    On the other hand, folks downvote such questions and answers because they believe that they are not useful. And we do not want to incentivise low quality content either.
    – E_net4
    Dec 13, 2023 at 15:04
  • @E_net4 Sure, that's a very good point. That's exactly why I don't want to take away the possibility of downvoting self-answered questions that have already been "ultimately" published on SO. My goal is only to avoid downvotes on valuable questions for things that can be easily and quickly corrected, hence suggestion for such place for question validation.
    – Reveson
    Dec 13, 2023 at 15:09
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    "When asking a question, the author mainly wants to get an answer, and whether their question is downvoted or not is secondary, as long as they get satisfactory help. No frustrations here." Wrong. Curators who believe in the original mission of the site are quite frustrated, seeing the site being reduced to a help desk. Dec 13, 2023 at 15:28
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    "But what if there was a place where people could share their draft question-with-answer without fear of negative votes?" - There is such a place - right here. One of the purposes of meta is to also ask for help asking a question when you're unsure. And there is probably also a chat room where you can ask for help. If anything I'd love to see more requests for help with formulating a question rather than requests for help lifting a question ban. But that'd require people to know things before they post things.
    – Gimby
    Dec 13, 2023 at 15:50
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    This doesn't solve the problem that once publicly posted "research effort" must be shown in a question post to avoid downvotes. Even though the self-answer shows research effort it isn't showing in the question. Moreover meta commentary is inappropriate so one shouldn't even be saying in one's question post that a question post is intended to be canonical the research effort is shown in a self-answer. Sometimes one could show research effort by quoting inadequate contradictory unclear etc reasonably-scored Q&A as research results. Yet that's noise.
    – philipxy
    Dec 14, 2023 at 0:42

1 Answer 1

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First, from comments:

When asking a question, the author mainly wants to get an answer, and whether their question is downvoted or not is secondary, as long as they get satisfactory help.

We're generally not particularly concerned with the motivations of those who post questions, as long as there is no malice (abuse, spam, etc.). But we don't only downvote bad questions, we close them; and an important consequence is that closed questions don't get answers (if we're fast enough).


But what if there was a place where people could share their draft question-with-answer without fear of negative votes? A place where we present a suggestions for a self-answered questions.

What isn't explained here is why this should be a source of fear. In the linked meta discussion, we didn't actually hear from the "content creator" responsible for the questions. (Incidentally: those questions did end up at positive score; the reputation system is heavily biased in that it gives +10 for an upvote but only -2 for a downvote; and users overall show a strong bias towards upvoting.)

If there's something wrong with a self-answered question, the same rules apply as for questions the OP cannot answer: it gets downvoted to keep it out of the way and closed to prevent receiving other answers, while it is in a state where answers are seen as inappropriate. (There are some people around who incorrectly believe there is something inherently wrong with self-answered questions; we can't do much about that because we can't herd all the cats to the water of Meta, let alone make them swim.) Ideally, OP responds by addressing the issue(s) identified with the question and editing. A self-answered question needs to be both a proper frame for the answer, and a valid question in its own right.

At any rate, it's certainly completely possible to do well-received self-answered questions - especially if they come from an identified need to close worse-asked versions as duplicates. For example:

Why isn't my class initialized by "def __int__" or "def _init_"? Why do I get a "takes no arguments" TypeError, or an AttributeError?

Why does tkinter (or turtle) seem to be missing or broken? Shouldn't it be part of the standard library?

Personally, I would prefer that all questions a) start closed; b) do not get voted on until they have been opened. But regardless I can see no reason why self-answered questions should get any special treatment.

If "content creators" (side note: many people will naturally associate this term with people who make clickbait YouTube videos to complain about Stack Overflow's "toxicity", completely misunderstand the site's purpose and tell us nothing we don't already know) are writing self-answered questions to help build the library, they are still responsible for meeting the library's standards, style guide etc.

If they are doing it to show off their knowledge of the topic, they also have the option of using a personal blog.

Even if a creator of self-answered question is only driven by the desire to gain reputation, what's wrong with that?

The reputation system has a lot of faults. Generally I would prefer to see content come from intrinsic motivation, anyway.

However, if a person, who builds such a portfolio has to risk a "random" (from their perspective) negative votes on their case-study, only to be frustrated that they "wasted" hours of their work, they certainly won't write it on Stack Overflow. They will be discouraged and write it on Medium, their own blog, etc.

If their content is not specifically oriented towards integrating into the Stack Overflow library, I would encourage them to do exactly that. That lets them have their own comment section that they can moderate as they like; it lets them explain the topic in a free-form way without being bound to the Q&A format; it lets them do their own SEO; it lets them put a PayPal link etc. on the page if they want; it lets them cross-promote their other content....

Stack Overflow is not a publishing platform.

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