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I will be referring to this stackoverflow question: Get global variable dynamically by name string in JavaScript

The title is clear, but I don't think most know what the body text is asking for. Nobody seems to mind though, because as this comment says, "I don't care what OP actually wanted. I care about what is in question title and therefore becomes google result in my searches." Given this popular question was asked over a decade ago, I tend to agree.

So I wondered if the question body should be rewritten to match the question title and/or the accepted answer. That way, other users don't waste time trying to interpret the unclear question body.

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  • My instinctive answer would be: If the author is OK with it, or, if the author is inactive/deleted, then yes. Nov 24, 2023 at 21:27
  • @user16217248 As far as I can tell, their last activity was 2020. Does that count as "inactive?" Nov 24, 2023 at 21:30
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    On their profile it says 'Last seen this week' so probably not. Nov 24, 2023 at 21:31
  • Just to note: google points me directly to answers because that is what I will be looking for. I have to actively remind myself (and the site periodically helps me with a message box) also to look at the question when applying votes. Because under normal operating circumstances, I have zero interest in the question. Not the title, not the body.
    – Gimby
    Nov 28, 2023 at 10:42

1 Answer 1

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So I wondered if the question body should be rewritten to match the question title and/or the accepted answer. That way, other users don't waste time trying to interpret the unclear question body.

There is nothing fundamentally wrong with either the question or answer. I can imagine making some cosmetic edits for clarity, but the question body does already match the question title and the accepted answer perfectly well. You just got a bad search result.

Search engines don't understand natural language (although those powered by a LLM might be more accurate). Programming terminology is heavily overloaded, and describing problems precisely is difficult - especially for people who are still learning the fundamentals working in a new programming language, framework, etc. and even more especially for people who are entirely new to programming. But those are also exactly the people who, by necessity, ask the overwhelming majority of questions, clogging search results. But even if we only allowed experts to post "canonical" Q&A targets and figure out what everyone else needs to know in order to learn programming, search engines would still get it wrong constantly.

That's partly because of the terminology, and partly because of the difficulty of understanding English. An LLM today might manage to "summarize" a web site accurately, or even accurately decide whether a given Stack Overflow question ought to be relevant to a natural-language search query that describes a specific problem (using all the same words as a completely different problem, which happens constantly in programming). But this simply doesn't scale to "indexing" the entire Web, for arbitrary questions that haven't even been asked yet.

I googled, "javascript how to get the name of the global variable"

The intended meaning of this query isn't clear to me as a human in the first place. In particular, I can't make sense of "the global variable", because there is more than one global variable.

If you meant, how to find out the name of the object where global variables are stored, you don't need to "get" that, because it's hard-coded in the DOM specification:

>> window["window"] === window
<- true

If you meant, how to use that object to access the global variables, that is exactly what the Q&A is about.

If you meant how to get the symbolic name of a particular global variable, then (a) the fact that the variable is global is completely irrelevant; b) that question is nonsensical, because it's equivalent to "how do I find out what code I just wrote"?

If you meant how to take an object that is stored in a global variable, and get a string that represents the name of a global variable it's stored in... it directly follows from what we've already seen here, that you can just search the properties of window. However, you won't be able to do a direct lookup because programming languages do not work that way. Objects do not contain the names that are used to refer to them, just as your own name is not encoded into your DNA.

If you meant anything else, I simply can't fathom it. I am already at the limit of my interpretative creativity, and the questions I'm reaching already barely make any sense to ask.

and this was the first result: Get global variable dynamically by name string in JavaScript

The title asks, given a string whose text corresponds to a global variable name, how to access the corresponding global variable, in a Javascript program.

The question body initially sets up an example of a variable named someVarName_10, and then proposes that "in another script" (I infer, another <script></script> tag on the same HTML page), the "name of the variable" (I assume, a string such as "someVarName_10") should be usable to access the first variable.

Then there is a more expanded example, where OP proposes to be able to do something like alert(all_vars['someVar' + 'Name' + num]); - that is, construct the string "someVarName_10" and use it to get the variable. As it happens, this is possible, and has the exact form that OP imagined; the hypothetical all_vars is identical to the actual window.

In short, the body of the question asks the same question as the title.

The accepted answer also addresses exactly that problem. There are also other answers that also address local variables - that is, doing the same sort of lookup within this, or within some other object explicitly created to serve as a namespace.

as this comment says, "I don't care what OP actually wanted. I care about what is in question title and therefore becomes google result in my searches."

This comment was made in 2015, and refers to a fundamentally different problem from the one that you are raising now. At the time, the question title said "local" instead of "global". That made the problem different enough for the commenter to object to the answer. But, as I said, there are other answers that also address the local variable case, including ones posted before that comment.

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  • "You just got a bad search result." I shouldn't have included that detail. It has nothing to do with my question, so I have removed it. Sorry for all the headache that caused :( Nov 25, 2023 at 0:03
  • I assume, a string such as "someVarName_10" That wasn't clear to me until I read your answer. I noticed the missing _, assumed that num was a number, not a string, and couldn't figure out what it was trying to do. In the end, you are right: this doesn't require a rewrite. I've edited the original question for clarity. Nov 25, 2023 at 0:10
  • I mean, num might very well be a number. That wouldn't cause a problem in Javascript since it will happy coerce the number to string for concatenation with +. But even if it didn't, that would be a completely separate issue. Clearly, the question is about how to, given that the string has been constructed, use it as if it were a variable name. Nov 25, 2023 at 0:47
  • IMO it would cause a "problem" because, before my edit, the string would've evaluated to someVarName10 which did not exist in the global scope, only someVarName_10 did. Since I didn't know why they would want to do that, I found the question confusing. Actually, I still find it confusing. [I]s it possible with local variable?" makes no sense to me. I didn't know where all_vars or num came from and guessed one or both of them was the local variable in question. In hindsight, I think that "local variable" statement is a red herring and should either be removed or rewritten. Nov 25, 2023 at 1:02
  • Oh, you were talking about the missing underscore specifically. If the entire problem really boiled down to that, then the question should be closed as caused by a typo, of course. If there's a detail like that which is irrelevant to the question actually being asked, then just edit to fix it. "[I]s it possible with local variable?" makes no sense to me" - I don't understand why you are confused. The natural interpretation is: given a string constructed the same way, (how) can we look up a local variable with that name? Nov 25, 2023 at 1:06
  • The natural interpretation is: given a string constructed the same way, (how) can we look up a local variable with that name? But that's the opposite of the title and the opposite of the accepted answer. They look up global variables with a string, not local. Nov 25, 2023 at 1:17
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    It seems that there was some misinterpretation along the way, and the title was edited, as I already noted. But this is not by any means "the opposite". Fundamentally, the same technique is used regardless of whether the lookup should be global or local - all that changes is where the lookup occurs. And existing answers cover both cases, exactly because of that initial confusion. Probably the question should be edited to be clear that it's about either case. That kind of scope broadening is useful and leaves a coherent question. Nov 25, 2023 at 1:23
  • It seems that there was some misinterpretation along the way, and the title was edited, as I already noted. Yes, the edit you are referring to happened in 2016, but that's irrelevant to my original question: my original question was/is about how the question looks now. "The same technique is used regardless," is only true if one assumes the author's unstated intention. IMHO, that makes the question "fundamentally wrong." Nov 28, 2023 at 2:19
  • The only reason I'm harping on this is because your answer acts like I misread or misunderstood something: I can imagine making some cosmetic edits for clarity, but **the question body does already match the question title and the accepted answer perfectly well**. No it doesn't. The title asks about globals, the body asks about locals, and the answers talk about both, due in part to the confusion over the question title/body! Nov 28, 2023 at 2:28
  • Yes, it does, because the same technique is used for both, and anyone who understands why the answer works for one, needs at most trivial additional information to solve the second. If both questions had asked (and the distinction sought) from the start, it would duplicate a lot of information and cause serious annoyance later when people fought over the inevitable attempts at duplicate closure. There was "confusion over the question title/body" exactly because people who want their code to work this way are likely not to expect the distinction to matter, if they even recognize it. Nov 28, 2023 at 3:22

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