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I have several pending flags going back to mid-August that are all pending. They are all for ChatGPT generated content which is perhaps why they are yet to be dealt with.

Is this a fallout of the recent(ish) strike action?

pending flags going back to Aug 30th

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    I flagged suspected AI use the other day and it was handled within a few hours. I still have flags from this summer pending. I just assume it's strike backlog that hasn't been gotten too yet (If it ever will be).
    – Shawn
    Nov 6, 2023 at 19:26
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    I also have a flag from late October on an answer that matched a strong heuristic, meaning the flag shouldn't be too time-consuming, so it's quite possibly just a long backlog. Not sure exactly what you wrote... but more generally, writing good flags may help with handling time, as "This answers is ChatGPT-generated" gives a mod less than "This answer was likely AI-generated because [reason 1] and [reason 2]". It's not always possible, but it can help.
    – cocomac
    Nov 6, 2023 at 20:22
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    I wish I knew what is happening with them and I am a moderator. I just skip all of these flags for the time being.
    – Dharman Mod
    Nov 6, 2023 at 21:13
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    Part of the problem with a lot of AI flags is that they don't explain why they believe the content to be AI-generated. Based on the length of the redacted flags in that screenshot, they appear to have that problem.
    – Ryan M Mod
    Nov 6, 2023 at 23:01
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    Also, if you haven't realized, now there's an (Interim) Policy on AI-content detection reports that mods have to consider before being able to take action.
    – Andrew T.
    Nov 7, 2023 at 0:58
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    @cocomac and RyanM, When you talk about giving reasons, you're only talking about borderline cases, right? Otherwise for straightforward cases (which I assume is the majority), I don't see how it would help to give "explanations" of AI phrasing/structure. If anything, I'd expect that to slow down the process for all parties involved.
    – tdy
    Nov 7, 2023 at 1:47
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    @tdy When a diamond moderator deletes content for being AI-generated, the post needs to be eligible under the heuristics. If a flagger says "This post contains the text 'As an AI language model', so I think it's LLM-generated and should be deleted", the mod can search for that text, confirm it's fake, and delete it. Otherwise, a moderator needs to read the entire post to check if any heuristics match, and then take action. That takes longer, so even if it's obvious to you, please add a reason to save the diamond mods time with these flags. It also means the "why" is partly already recorded.
    – cocomac
    Nov 7, 2023 at 2:05
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    @cocomac I see. I can start including my personal heuristics, but I think your scenarios are only true when the flagger knows the official heuristics. Otherwise if I provide a list of 1 actionable reason and 5 non-actionable reasons, then that doesn't save the mod's time, and it doesn't actually document the "why" (in fact the opposite -- it would include 5 invalid reasons).
    – tdy
    Nov 7, 2023 at 3:34
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    @tdy the problem is that what's obvious to one person may not be obvious to another, especially if the reason it's obvious is subject-matter- and context-specific. Separately, even when we can tell, it requires a lot of analysis if we need to read the question and answer to tell if it makes sense. If the flagger has already done that, it saves a lot of time, especially with literal thousands of these flags and a couple dozen volunteer moderators. The influx of AI content has increased the moderation workload dramatically, at a time when we were already barely keeping up.
    – Ryan M Mod
    Nov 7, 2023 at 4:57
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    on the point about helping out the mods by putting detail in your flags about why you think something is AI-generated: see What does a good flag for suspected AI (e.g., ChatGPT) content look like? by NotTheDr01ds on MSE.
    – starball
    Nov 7, 2023 at 6:25
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    @tdy my personal stance (not backed by anything official) is that it's fine to mention heuristics that aren't approved yet, or if you don't know that they are approved (though it would be a waste of everyone's time and space to mention a heuristic that you know is not approved). maybe the heuristic will be approved in the future. again- this is a personal stance of mine. I'm not a mod, so I'm not deeply familiar with what affect it has on their workflow, though I imagine this might have drawbacks (but I'll put the blame on tooling needing improvements)
    – starball
    Nov 7, 2023 at 6:28
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    @RyanM: well there are tools like zerogpt.cc and gptzero.me that perform statistical analysis on AI-generated content. While not very "robust", often people that post AI-generated content, don't stick to one or two answers (based on, of course, a biased view), so as the number of answers increases, so does the probability. Anther aspect is that these people typically answer a very broad range of topics. Nov 7, 2023 at 8:34
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    @willeM_VanOnsem These topics were discussed at length a few months ago. One of the problems which led to the strike was blind faith in AI detection tools by some actors.
    – tripleee
    Nov 7, 2023 at 9:59
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    @willeM_VanOnsem Many of those detectors are pretty bad, and they're not especially useful for moderators trying to validate flags. For example, the first one you link is highly suspect, with conclusory assertions like "its functioning stems from authentic and well-grounded research" (why should I believe that?) and statistically flawed statements like "The results presented a 99% and higher accuracy rate." (measured how? on what data?). I do not believe current technology can achieve 99% area-under-curve accuracy on a reasonable dataset, making that claim very likely misleading at best.
    – Ryan M Mod
    Nov 7, 2023 at 21:58
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    The only way I've seen automated detectors used effectively is as a way to filter all new posts down to more suspicious stuff to consider flagging.
    – Ryan M Mod
    Nov 7, 2023 at 22:03

1 Answer 1

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Is this a fallout of the recent(ish) strike action?

To some extent, but there's a lot more at play here. I do think we probably owe you (and the other flaggers) some explanation of what's going on.

The wind died down

Prior to the strike, we actually had the queue decently in hand. There was a good mix of moderators who were handling lots and lots of flags. The call-up was, by all accounts, a true success.

The strike hurt all that. Active mods slowed down long before the strike itself hit. The strike itself dragged on for nearly 2 months. Mod activity has not returned to anywhere near pre-strike levels. Recent events have not helped that sentiment.

We will have to run an election at some point. There's been discussion on that, but we wanted to let the strike things settle, to see if some mods returned and/or resigned. With the SE staff shakeup, that's left things unsettled even more (we have less staff to work with, and it's still not clear who does what with less folks to do it). I expect things will settle out, but there's just not much in the area of moderator drive right now.

AI policy isn't all that clear

Let's talk about the real elephant in the room: AI policy. It was central to the strike but the initial resolution wasn't clear

Stack Exchange has agreed to allow the removal of content based on a single strong indicator of GPT usage, or on several weaker indicators. Effective immediately, the interim standards that we have agreed on will serve as policy until a more permanent policy is established with the help of the broader community, including determining further heuristics and what category they will fall into. Moderation should follow the standard escalation for suspensions, beginning with a warning and then escalating suspensions if infractions continue.

There's been progress between SE and the community on making some clear reasoning to deal with AI posts, but there's also a general sense that there's a lot more to enforcement of AI than before, and we have to not only navigate the belief of users that there are AI posts being made, but navigate these more difficult waters. Because of that, AI flags (which weren't that easy to handle before) are now even more cumbersome to handle.

There's a lot of AI flags

Unlike plagiarism, I don't think it's practical to request a specific flag at this time. But the strike left us a giant pile of flags and the lion's share of them are AI related

Mod flags as of now

Of that number, I'd estimate 90-95% are AI related. We are still removing AI content and warning users when it's clear they're doing so. But it's going to take time (and likely some new mods) to clear the log entirely.

TL;DR

We're handling flags to the best extent of our volunteer moderator force. They are not being ignored. But there's a lot of these flags hanging out there after months of strike-induced buildup. It's going to take time. After the AI policy is hardened up, and the staff is clearer on who does what, hopefully some folks will step up and volunteer to help with it.

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    am I interpreting the TL;DR right that preconditions for the next mod election are the "hardening up" of the AI policy (what exactly does that mean?) and SE sorting out its staff roles? (I've been seriously considering self-nominating to be a mod to help with the chatgpt and other flags, and honestly I'm kind of itching to have a go at it)
    – starball
    Nov 7, 2023 at 10:06
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    @starball the point is, we want to make sure we don't set new mods up for failure by placing them before a huge non-actionable backlog. There is no Company-imposed requirement about what flags users can raise, only recommendations and community consensus. But the interim policy is binding for moderators, who are those who eventually press the "Delete" button.
    – blackgreen Mod
    Nov 7, 2023 at 11:59
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    Then there's the very practical issue that moderator elections are organized and run by Staff, and after the last layoffs it's unclear who in the Company is in charge of that.
    – blackgreen Mod
    Nov 7, 2023 at 12:02
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    To be explicit, Catija has run every SO election since Shog9 left. Considering CMs are still trying to figure out their other roles, it's not clear who will be running them now (case in point, see Rev 14 on this post)
    – Machavity Mod
    Nov 7, 2023 at 15:16
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    "We will have to run an election at some point." Honestly I'm surprised one hasn't been run this year. We're running out of time and it's been a year since the last one. We've only been raising more flags, and losing experienced moderators to inactivity/protest.
    – TylerH
    Nov 7, 2023 at 16:49
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    I will say that if y'all (SO Mods) have interest in holding an election, definitely contact the CM team as early as you can. SO elections take some time to schedule and a lot of time to run.
    – Slate StaffMod
    Nov 7, 2023 at 20:34
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    @TylerH it hasn't been run for the reasons mentioned in this post. Even with the team in full force, 90% of flags are unprocessable.
    – blackgreen Mod
    Nov 8, 2023 at 8:58
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    @blackgreen What do you mean by "unprocessable"? If you can't find sufficient indicates of AI generation, a flag can be declined or at best disputed.
    – TylerH
    Nov 8, 2023 at 14:47
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    @TylerH unprocessable because many posts are clearly AI-generated but there aren’t approved heuristics to support its deletion. So the flag is valid, but we effectively can’t action it and leave it pending. Obviously, a mod wouldn’t dream of declining a valid flag just because the company requires a lot of bureaucracy. Also, only R/A and spam flags can be disputed.
    – blackgreen Mod
    Nov 8, 2023 at 15:27
  • @blackgreen Does this mean that you are hoping for a change (additions) to the heuristics? Because otherwise I think declining them is the least of the two evils Nov 8, 2023 at 15:39
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    @IslamHassan yes, the heuristics are being actively discussed together with Staff and expanded
    – blackgreen Mod
    Nov 8, 2023 at 16:10
  • @blackgreen "...90% of flags are unprocessable." That is some quantitative information that wasn't available so far. Even if only say half of all flags are really positives, it would mean that most of AI generated content isn't removed at the moment. Maybe the strike result is less positive than it was announced and at least for the present most AI generated content won't get deleted. Nov 9, 2023 at 11:30
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    @NoDataDumpNoContribution FWIW, I think that 90% "unprocessable" is probably not the best term. 90% of the flags are better described as "very difficult to process". It takes me, on average, 5-10 minutes to do my AI evaluation. In terms of flag handling, that's a pretty long time for a single post, and we have thousands of such posts. It's a fair question to ask how much a moderator can do with such a workload before them before burnout sets in.
    – Machavity Mod
    Nov 9, 2023 at 13:42
  • Many times I've wanted to use Plagiarism as a flag for ChatGPT answers, since that's pretty much what it is, a copied answer.
    – Daviid
    Nov 13, 2023 at 7:49

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