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Ok guys, it's a meme at this point. New person asks question, and within 10 minutes it gets marked as a duplicate by some high-reputation user. And y'know what? A lot of times, perhaps the overwhelming majority of the time, they're right to mark it as a duplicate, and it's a good thing to remove the question because it's just a poorly-asked variant of a question that was asked 10 years ago.

On the other hand, this is like 99% of where complaints of "toxicity" and elitism come from when people complain about SO off-site, and for the last 5-10 years, a lot of people just don't bother anymore and ask the question on Reddit and get a better reception. And I figure this question will probably get the same reception (but believe me, I put a lot of effort into looking for a similar question on meta, only to come back empty-handed), get closed as a duplicate, and disappear into the abyss, only for this long-standing problem to continue unsolved. This might just be another case of "Man yelling at cloud".

I think this attitude of reaching quickly for the "Mark as Duplicate" ban-hammer has created a web of blind spots of questions that could have been answered but are erroneously regarded as duplicates. In a recent exchange with another user, I suggested asking a question for something that, indeed, is nowhere to be found across all of Stack Overflow, or even Google searches for that matter. And y'know what, they don't even want to bother asking the question because it will more than likely get marked as a duplicate. They even link to another question that was erroneously marked as a duplicate ages ago that would probably be the question it would be considered a duplicate of.

This problem is that bad, and it has been for nearly 10 years. Mods and high-rep users are so overzealous about marking duplicates that nobody is bothering to ask new questions about old topics. Stack Overflow has effectively become read-only for everything that has been around for more than a few years.

And it's funny too, because most other sites on the network don't have this problem.

So what's the solution here?

In my most charitable analysis of the problem I can fathom, perhaps there's just too much crap coming down the pipe to actually pay attention to necessary details to properly distinguish low-effort real duplicates from actual blind spots. Perhaps there is a shortage of qualified and properly incentivized volunteers tackling this problem. Reputation is damn near impossible to get unless you were around in the early days of the site, so basically no one can get the rep to even downvote, let alone view the review queues- and then there's still little incentive to engage with the review queues. And with one controversy after another driving out good moderators and active users that make this site what it is, perhaps it shouldn't be surprising that there aren't enough good and motivated reviewers (which effectively turns otherwise good reviewers into a bad ones by starving them of the time they need to do the job well).

I think this problem is deeply systemic, and in essence, I don't have any ideas that wouldn't require a total overhaul of nearly everything about the SE network, its systems, and probably its business model. I hope someone else has actionable ideas.

I'm hoping my rant can bring about discussion for change that people have been hungry for over the last decade. But alas, I suspect this will probably get downvoted into oblivion as it ruffles some feathers and ultimately accomplishes nothing. I have no reason to expect that my rant will bring about any positive change just because I complained to the right people about something that everyone already knows is a problem. I'm a nobody with less than 1000 reputation on SO, but I think I speak for a lot of people in my rant above.

So make of it what you will. I'm hitting the submit button now.

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  • 11
    Sure, it's easy to close a question as a duplicate but it's just as easy to reopen it. Perhaps not enough people are actually reopening incorrectly closed questions.
    – Dharman Mod
    Nov 1, 2023 at 21:16
  • 3
    FWIW mods do reach out to some users who incorrectly close as a duplicate. But that's rather rare.
    – Dharman Mod
    Nov 1, 2023 at 21:17
  • 25
    Why is a question getting marked as a duplicate intrinsically bad to you? If someone asks a question, and we can find a duplicate (usually because they couldn't do their own research), then we can give them a wide variety of answers much more quickly. If anything, there are too many people answering low quality questions that are blatant duplicates.
    – vandench
    Nov 1, 2023 at 21:18
  • 24
    And y'know what? A lot of times, perhaps the overwhelming majority of the time, they're right to mark it as a duplicate. Ok great, so there's no problem then.
    – JK.
    Nov 1, 2023 at 21:33
  • 11
    If I ask a well asked question, and it gets closed as a duplicate which answers the question that's not "chilling", it's good; I have the answer to my question. If I ask a bad question and get the answer (due to being closed as a duplicate), that's still good for me as I got the answer; it's just bad on me that I made a poor attempt at asking (or researching).
    – Thom A
    Nov 1, 2023 at 21:40
  • 12
    So it's bad that we provide users with links to existing content? Are you suggesting that bad question should get answers because directing them to good content is "bad"..? I fail to see how pointing users to a solution is "discouraging" them to ask questions. They asked a question, they got an answer. How is that discouraging someone to ask again? Such people are here for answers, not to provide good content (as often duplicates can be easily found).
    – Thom A
    Nov 1, 2023 at 21:41
  • 5
    Speaking for myself only: I don't care if people complain, I only care if their complaints are valid. I also don't care one iota if people use other sites or find them more accommodating. Nov 1, 2023 at 21:44
  • 20
    If these questions are not duplicates, why are the authors not modifying them, to make it clear their reason(s) the answers to the already existing question does not actually answer the question they asked? You say reviewers are too excited to close questions, I say users are too excited to ask their questions and are actually asking questions that has already been answered. Nov 1, 2023 at 21:45
  • 12
    You also say "most questions" are marked as a duplicate, but on the first 5 pages, I see a very low number of questions closed as a duplicate. I see no evidence people are discouraged from asking questions based on the number of new questions that have been asked in the last hour. "Reputation is damn near impossible to get" - This is absolutely false. Nov 1, 2023 at 21:45
  • 9
    @Beefster - Questions are not closed if they are "related", if users are closing questions as duplicates with an answer, that does not answer the actual question then that question is being improperly closed. You say this has been a problem for years but don't provide any actual metrics to validate that statement Nov 1, 2023 at 21:47
  • 5
    If the question is related, then it wouldn't be closed as a duplicate. We close as duplicates not "as related", @Beefster .
    – Thom A
    Nov 1, 2023 at 21:49
  • 12
    At this point in the history of Stack Overflow, for most mature technologies, I'd expect almost every question to have already been answered. See new questions closed as duplicates should really not be surprising at all. To me, that means Stack Overflow is working. Nov 1, 2023 at 21:57
  • 21
    "Dozens of Youtubers have demonstrated how downright hostile the site seems to new users, and it never changes." - I can almost guarantee you that their issues with the community are due to their unwillingness to address the issues with their questions, and mistakenly believe, we should simply answer their questions the way they asked them regardless of the quality of their questions. Nov 1, 2023 at 22:06
  • 4
    Re "Reputation is damn near impossible to get unless you were around in the early days of the site": An (unethical) way is to literally ask thousands of (low-quality) questions and ignore downvotes, etc. This will give tens of thousands of reputation points. The system rewards quantity over quality. Nov 1, 2023 at 22:34
  • 6
    "I once again reiterate my challenge (maybe I should make it into another meta question) to some madlad high-rep user to replicate some measure of success on a new account." I did that in 2018: codeblog.jonskeet.uk/2018/09/19/farewell-daisy-shipton - "Daisy" didn't ask any questions, but did manage to gain a reputation of about 12,000 in under 6 months from answers, proving that it's perfectly possible to still get rep from more recent questions.
    – Jon Skeet
    Nov 2, 2023 at 15:29

1 Answer 1

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New person asks question, and within 10 minutes it gets marked as a duplicate by some high-reputation user.

This gets you an answer faster. A lot of the time the user's problem could've been resolved by doing proper research, that's sort of why we have "canonical" questions, because people keep asking the same question over and over again. Other times the user lacks the requisite knowledge to do proper research, either way, we're still answering their question. It's important to remember that duplicates are based more on the answer than on the question, this has been a longstanding precedent.

they're right to mark it as a duplicate, and it's a good thing to remove the question because it's just a poorly-asked variant of a question that was asked 10 years ago.

A duplicate question is not inherently worth deleting. It may be a novel perspective that still has the same underlying answer. It can create a signpost that helps other users find the answer faster.

On the other hand, this is like 99% of where complaints of "toxicity" and elitism come from when people complain about SO off-site, and for the last 5-10 years, a lot of people just don't bother anymore and ask the question on Reddit and get a better reception.

I've heard stuff like this a lot. We still have a lot of users (both those who ask and answer questions, and people who find an answer here). Just because we're more interested in creating a library of high quality Q&A, and Reddit is willing to repeatedly answer the same zero research question, doesn't mean that we're doomed to fail. Even if no more questions are ever asked, we still have a lot of information available here. I'd bet that a lot of the answers on Reddit source their information from SO.

I think this attitude of reaching quickly for the "Mark as Duplicate" ban-hammer has created a web of blindspots of questions that could have been answered but are erroneously regarded as duplicates.

Marking as duplicate is not a "ban-hammer". As far as we're aware, a question being marked as a duplicate has no effect on a question ban. Marking as a duplicate gets people answers. Why wouldn't you want that to happen quickly in the overwhelming majority of cases?

Of the cases where the duplicate was erroneous, there usually was an underlying problem with how the question was asked that prevented one from fully understanding the true underlying question. That's why you have the ability to edit your question to clarify how it is not a duplicate, and why we have the ability to re-open questions. In these cases, getting closed was still good, as it resulted in the question getting clarified such that it could be answered correctly. In fact, if the opposite had occurred, and the question had been answered (albeit a duplicate answer), you might be more upset to find out that your attempts to change your question are rejected because they would invalidate an existing answer.


As with many things I see people complain about, this is only perceived as bad by people who fundamentally misunderstand our goals. Our goal isn't to help you, it's to help everyone who has the same question in the future.

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