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From previous discussions, the consensus is that we do not remove or close questions that ask about outdated technology. We keep them to help people who have to maintain legacy systems and for historical reasons.

Now suppose we have a question about the API of a service, but the service (or only the API) does not exist anymore and there is no replacement service available. In this case, there will not be any people who are still using the API, not even for legacy reasons.

Yet there are still upvoted and unanswered questions around that can't be answered anymore due to the lack of API availability.

  • Should we close such questions because they are impossible to answer?

  • Do we just keep them around?

  • Should we answer those questions stating the the API is gone?

  • What do we do with questions that do have answers already?

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    My immediate thought would be to VTC as not reproducible. As for keeping them around; I don't see why we would delete content that was previously seen as useful (I know you say they are unanswered, but that doesn't mean that they didn't get upvotes).
    – Thom A
    Oct 31, 2023 at 12:36
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    @ThomA: Almost all questions that are affected will have upvotes since unanswered questions without votes are deleted by community after some time. If you are interested, this here is the question that actually spared the meta post: stackoverflow.com/questions/24321735/…
    – BDL
    Oct 31, 2023 at 12:38
  • Would the source code for this service no longer be available for public download? Oct 31, 2023 at 12:45
  • 2
    @BDL not true. A question with comments or other interactions may not be deleted by the roomba, even if it has a negative score. Example.
    – Thom A
    Oct 31, 2023 at 12:52
  • Maybe it's better to place the link to the problematic question directly in your meta-question, so no one suffers from imagining justifiable hypothetical situation Oct 31, 2023 at 12:54
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    @AugustoVasques I'd think that's is going to be the exception. For example, Google+ had a public API. But not any more. The source code is (to the best of my knowledge) not available for public download. And even if it was, it'd hardly matter without the actual Google+ service. Twitter and Reddit also shut off their free API, so while they still exist, any old information about API usage is on the verge of becoming obsolete as soon as the API changes. And no source code would "fix" that.
    – VLAZ
    Oct 31, 2023 at 12:54
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    With the source, the individual can recreate the service locally, thus giving meaning to a potential question Oct 31, 2023 at 12:58
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    @AugustoVasques: Running the API locally would only matter if the data the api provided could also be replicated locally (which I doubt for Yahoo Auction or Google+ or google code). I didn't put the link in the question to prevent discussions about this specific question instead of general discussions.
    – BDL
    Oct 31, 2023 at 13:01
  • Note that in this case, we're not talking about non-existent URIs. Or are we just talking about missing URIs? Oct 31, 2023 at 13:07
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    -> If the framework or api isn't available anymore, we/the site may need a new flagging category. | -> If it's still available, it's mostly subjective whether it's outdated or not. | ->> Either way, the questions should stay on the site, as long as they are 'no crap' (very subjective as well) and no duplicates AND no framework with the same name comes around. [my opinion] Oct 31, 2023 at 13:18
  • If the question does document what the API should be doing, then it can probably still be answered, can it not? Otherwise it is probably not reproducible anymore, which would be a reason to flag.
    – Cuzy
    Oct 31, 2023 at 13:44
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    @Cuzy: I'm not sure if an answer is still possible. Let's say the question is "How do I query the number of likes from the Google+ API" and the API is gone, then even if you know in detail what it should return, it's still not possible to answer anymore when API is shut down.
    – BDL
    Oct 31, 2023 at 14:01
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    Why would anything need to be done? A question that hasn't received an answer is a common thing around here. The fact that it's about a system that's no longer in operation doesn't mean that it suddenly turned unanswerable. Neither does this make the question (and potential answer(s)) invaluable. I wonder what specific issue you see that needs to be solved here. Oct 31, 2023 at 14:33
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    For the specific question from some searching it seems the service is still available in Japan and Taiwan. I don't know if the API is any different but given it still exists it might be better to leave it open unless we have clarity on that. Oct 31, 2023 at 14:38
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    I don't see any value in actively seeking out cases like this to close, though i wouldn't fault a no repro close if the problem the question was addressing is unique to the given api.
    – Kevin B
    Oct 31, 2023 at 14:49

2 Answers 2

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This topic has now popped up a few times. IMO the discussions of this topic are doing way more harm than these questions ever could1. There is not, and never was a promise that all questions on SO will eventually be answered (or closed). These questions don't attract new off-topic questions. These questions will not pollute search engine results (unless very badly named new APIs pop up and search engines fail to do their job). It might even be possible at some point to answer these questions. They can potentially be valuable for historic purposes.

So: Why exactly do we have to do anything with the questions? What harm are they causing? We don't need a reason to not do something, we need a reason to do something.


1: Ok, the claim that these meta discussions are causing harm is a bit extreme. I am just not sure if this is a good use of meta user attention when instead it could be focused on burniation requests (for example)

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    Pretty much sums up my feelings: Questions don't hurt and are potentially valuable. Doing anything at this point is doing harm. Oct 31, 2023 at 18:42
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    The linked example is one where someone stumbled upon the question and left an answer saying the API is gone; that then went into the low quality posts queue and required folks' time to review and address, and generated debate on close votes for the question (whereas if there was a policy, it could be closed and done). They also pollute the unanswered tab of tag feeds. Nov 3, 2023 at 19:03
  • @XiongChiamiov That was a new user leaving a bad answer, and then people unnecessarily following up with a debate about the question. Attracting bad answers is not something I mentioned in my answer. Since close votes for that are quick, and the answers hopefully being rare, I don't see that being an issue.
    – MegaIng
    Nov 4, 2023 at 23:53
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Now suppose we have a question about the API of a service, but the service (or only the API) does not exist anymore and there is no replacement service available. In this case, there will not be any people who are still using the API, not even for legacy reasons.

The service no longer exists, but there may be software written to its API. In the future, another service might come along that wants to clone its API, and knowing what the API looked like would be vital for this effort.

Yet there are still upvoted and unanswered questions around that can't be answered anymore due to the lack of API availability.

Existing software still exists. Even if all API documentation has been incinerated, we can still answer questions about the API by looking at how existing software calls it.

Running the API locally would only matter if the data the api provided could also be replicated locally (which I doubt for Yahoo Auction or Google+ or google code).

Auctions, social media, and software aren't things that go away. Nobody's going to make a Yahoo! Auctions API, but they could want to make a Yahoo! Auctions-compatible API for a different auction system: for that, the questions are still valuable.

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    I don't see how Stack Overflow questions are that valuable to reverse engineer the schema of an API, using the wayback machine to access the documentation would probably be much better for that purpose. Personally I don't see much utility in answering something that won't work. Closing as "Not reproducible" sounds like the proper course to me (If the API actually doesn't exist anymore). Oct 31, 2023 at 14:44
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    There's more to an API than its schema. Besides, we're not in the business of closing questions that I can't answer: we close questions that are off-topic, not appropriate for the site, or can't be answered by anyone. (Or are duplicates, but that's a different kind of closure.)
    – wizzwizz4
    Oct 31, 2023 at 14:46
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    We don't close questions that one person in particular can't answer yes. But we do close questions that the community can't answer reasonably (For example questions that would require answers from a package's author or from a company support). In this case someone might be able to answer by looking at old resources but the problem itself isn't reproducible, so there's no way to validate the answer and little value in answering it as well. Oct 31, 2023 at 14:50
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    merely being about an API that no longer exists doesn't automagically make the question irrelevant to the community. There are many issues one may run into when working with API's that aren't directly related to any specific api.
    – Kevin B
    Oct 31, 2023 at 14:52
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    @KevinB I don't think that's under discussion. (Probably worth noting anyway, though.)
    – wizzwizz4
    Oct 31, 2023 at 14:55
  • To be abundantly clear, the API exists. A deprecated service previously known to implement that API may no longer exist, but the API never stops existing.
    – Josiah
    Nov 2, 2023 at 19:52
  • @wizzwizz4 Close a question because it has no answer. But to know this we have to leave the question up in the first place. If the source is not available, there may be people who worked on it, or know another product that used the same code, or knew the paper from which the algorithm was taken. Tag questions that have no answer, and close them after a typical period when 90% of the answers usually have come in, and there is still no sniff of an answer. But give serendipity a chance too. Nov 2, 2023 at 20:09
  • @RichardKirk If no member of this class of question could ever possibly have an answer, then sure, vote to close on those grounds. If, in your expert opinion, this particular question has no answer, stay well away from the close button: by Clarke's First Law, you are probably wrong.
    – wizzwizz4
    Nov 3, 2023 at 2:46

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