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Somebody asks a question: they want to code something, but it seems not to work. They add some source code in order to show their efforts.

Question: is this a valid post?

My answer: yes, why not?

Stack Overflow answer: Not at all! If you would actually open a development environment and launch the code, you would see that it works! You are bad!!!

My reaction: Please hold your horses. I am just reviewing the question and this one looks ok. The fact that it isn't because of reproducibility is something I had no idea of.

Next case:

Somebody asks: why does a design tool, which is widely used, not exist for my programming language?

My reaction: although this is more for "softwareengineering.stackexchange.com" it can start an interesting discussion.

Stack Overflow reaction: this proves without a doubt that you are not taking reviews seriously, and you will be banned from this part of the website for more than a year!

Is that guy joking? No, he's not! (Link to first post, link to second post)

Seriously, don't you see you are going too far here?

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    it can start an interesting discussion: Stack Overflow is not for discussions. For the second question it's also quite unclear why UML would be tied to a specific framework or programming language. I'm not even sure what op means by "I see that languages like Java, C# and C++ use UML class diagrams". None of these languages has any "native" support for diagrams. Some IDEs might have, but I'm not sure what op is actually asking for. Also not sure why op thinks that JavaScript or Python developers don't use UML, I've certainly seen it being used.
    – BDL
    Oct 16, 2023 at 12:04
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    "The fact that it isn't because of irreproducibility is something I had no idea of." I mean you yourself admit you didn't know how to properly review the code. Seems a bit weird to then call out the review audit for...confirming that you shouldn't have acted as confidently as you did.
    – VLAZ
    Oct 16, 2023 at 12:06
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    Adding to what BDL mentioned, people on Stack Overflow probably can't answer that question. Maybe the developers didn't even think of such a feature (Whatever such feature would be? Maybe generating part of the code using UML diagrams?), maybe they thought of it but felt it wouldn't be that useful. In the end that question is specifically targeted to the framework developers themselves and should be asked in the appropriate place to get feedback from them. Oct 16, 2023 at 12:09
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    Glad to see that both wrong reviews were caught.
    – Tom
    Oct 16, 2023 at 13:29
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    If you choose to review again after your review suspension is lifted, please consider using a tag filter. It's generally really hard to properly review tags in which you do not have considerable experience answering questions. The only real way to do so is to make liberal use of the Skip button, questions can appear well-asked but still contain incomprehensible code, obvious typos or be common duplicates.
    – Erik A
    Oct 16, 2023 at 14:22
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    Users are not suspended from review for a year, without a continuous pattern of, choosing the wrong action while reviewing items in a respective queue. Furthermore, if I am not mistaken, a year suspension from the review queue is a result of a moderator's intervention. That intervention is only a result of the moderator being made aware, either through reports or their personal observation, of a user's incorrect review decisions. Incorrect decisions in the review process can have significant impacts on the community. Those audits are not bad, in fact they prove, users should pay attention. Oct 16, 2023 at 15:02
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    Pretty sure the site never said "You are bad!!!", that is all in your imagination. The signal you are getting is more that you are wrong.
    – Gimby
    Oct 19, 2023 at 8:22

2 Answers 2

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I am just reviewing the question and this one "looks ok".

Relevant review task.

Sadly, the "looks ok" button help text is rather misleading. It simply says: "This question can be understood and answered as-is (be sure to vote accordingly).". But that's not an accurate and complete description of what "looks ok" is in this context: You should also make sure that the question does not merit closing. If a question should be closed (e.g. a typo question), then it does not "look ok".

The fact that it isn't because of reproducibility is something I had no idea of.

In this case, it's probably for the best that one spends more time familiarizing with the site rules before spending time reviewing other users work to see if it's fine for the site or not.

although this is more for "softwareengineering.stackexchange.com" it can start an interesting discussion.

Relevant review task.

Again, in review, it's important to look if questions are a good fit for the site. That a question "can start an interesting discussion" or not, is not a good heuristic to determine that. Look for quality and topicality, when deciding if a question "looks ok" or not.

Also, please remember that helping first-time users by editing their question -so they are more aligned with site expectations- is a good thing to do. For example, even if the second question was completely good for the site (it's not), at the very least it would have benefited from a general edit to remove noise.

If unsure, skipping is always a good thing to do; and if looking for these things is not for you, you may be better off by avoiding this queue.


and you will be banned from this part of the website for more than a year!

If you were actually review-banned for more than a year, it means this is far from the first time you have issues on review.

Spending additional time on review without stopping to learn how one should be doing it, would simply be bad for you (you'd be wasting time by doing something in a way that's not appreciated) and bad for the site (incorrect reviews are not simply "not good", but actively harmful for the site).

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    Worth noting that in the second review task the question actually asks three distinct questions. One in the title: "Why don't frameworks like Django, Express and others often use class diagrams with UML?" which is probably one that can "start an interesting discussion". However, in the body of the post it also asks "Which software engineering and systems design tool to use in framworks like Django?" which is different. As is "How then to architect these systems?"
    – VLAZ
    Oct 16, 2023 at 12:37
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    'That a question "can start an interesting discussion" or not, is not a good heuristic to determine that.' - Actually I find that heuristic to be quite good: almost any "interesting discussion" does NOT fit for Stack Overflow (as a question).
    – Tsyvarev
    Oct 16, 2023 at 14:46
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Before we get into the technical details of what conclusions you are expected to reach when using the review queues, I need to talk about your mindset.

What's wrong with the Stack Overflow review process?

If you want to have a productive discussion on the Meta site, please approach the discussion from the perspective that there was probably conscious thought behind previous decisions. Questions shouldn't read like a rant here, just as they shouldn't on the main site. If you think something is wrong, then you should focus on one specific thing, clearly state how you think it should work instead, and give reasoning. Asking whether "you are going too far" isn't ever going to go over well, especially when it isn't clear who "you" refers to (the community, the moderators and automated systems such as review queues all need to be thought about separately). Especially not if you assume you're right about everything and preemptively express frustration that others disagree (i.e. "don't you see...").

My answer: yes, why not?

This is fundamentally the wrong way to approach the queue. Keep in mind that the point of the First Questions review queue is to focus on questions that are likely to have issues (since they are being asked by people without experience in asking questions on Stack Overflow!) and get them closed where appropriate. We have specific standards, that have been continually discussed and refined across Stack Overflow's 15-year history, for good reason. The bar is high because of the mission described in the tour, to create a useful, searchable library. Yes, there are a lot (millions) of old questions lying around that don't measure up. All the more reason to care about what comes in now.


Stackoverflow answer: Not at all! If you would actually open a development environment and launch the code, you would see that it works! You are BAD!!!

First off: no, Stack Overflow never tells people that they "are bad". Users doing so would be against the Code of Conduct, after all. If an automated system message gave you that impression, it was definitely not intended. However, if you are objecting to the specific phrasing of such a message, it would be much more helpful to cite the actual message, and offer a constructive suggestion for improvement.

I am sympathetic to the idea that review audits shouldn't include questions that were closed as "not reproducible or was caused by a typo" - they're definitionally harder to notice, and there is no lack of questions that "lack debugging details" instead. However, the problem in this question was indeed caused by a typo. It's perfectly "reproducible", in the sense that someone else can make the same typo. However, such questions about typos aren't good for the site, and are closed for that reason.

To be explicit, the typo is in this part of the code:

        var positive = numbers.Where(n => n  > 0);
        positive.Count();
        var negative = numbers.Where(n => n  < 0);
        negative.Count();
        var zeroes   = numbers.Where(     n == 0);
        zeroes.Count();

Aside from the fact that the .Count() calls are useless (to get the result OP wanted, they should probably be part of the same expression), there's a clear lack of parallelism here. OP tries to do the same thing three times, but the compiler complains about one of them because the technique is different. Specifically, the working lines have n => in them; the non-working line doesn't. (I adjusted the spacing in order to make the issue stand out as much as possible.)

Because the code contains working examples of the same thing OP is supposedly asking to fix, we can conclude that the failure is a typo, rather than the result of a lack of knowledge (which could form the basis for a proper question).

While a good question could presumably ask what is wrong with numbers.Where(n == 0), it would have to do so in isolation. Even then, it would be a little sketchy: anyone who uses LINQ methods like .Where should already be aware that the argument is a little "special" (a sort of higher-order function, in the style that C# uses), because knowing that the method exists in the first place ought to involve either reading documentation or following a tutorial that should have already explained the trick.

A better question would be a how-to question, simply asking how to provide an argument to .Where, what the => syntax means, or something else along those lines. That would allow for answerers to provide a guide that's better than what documentation or typical tutorials offer. I'm not intimately familiar with C# canonicals, but I would hope that high-quality questions of that sort already exist (if I'm feeling really optimistic, I might hope for exactly one such question ;) ).


Somebody asks: why does a design tool, which is widely used, not existing for my programming language?

My reaction: although this is more for "softwareengineering.stackexchange.com" it can start an interesting discussion.

This question is straightforwardly off topic. We don't want questions that solicit opinions, and we especially don't want "questions" that really just complain about a design decision that someone else made.

But aside from that, the question is very unclear. In particular: the title says "Why don't frameworks like Django, Express and others often use class diagrams with UML?" - and here, I have absolutely no idea:

  • What does "others" mean? How should we know, for the purposes of this question, whether a framework is "like" Django or Express? What does the author of the question think those two examples have in common? (They aren't even for the same programming language!)

  • What does "use" mean? A UML diagram is something that programmers create in order to talk about and document a class hierarchy. So is the question really "Why doesn't the documentation use UML diagrams to explain the hierarchy of classes in the framework"? Or is it really "Why doesn't the framework provide utilities to create and manipulate UML diagrams"? Or perhaps something else entirely?

Moving on from there, the question text seems somewhat disconnected from the title, and suggests a general confusion. It starts out "Which software engineering and systems design tool to use in framworks like Django?" which is asking for a recommendation - which is a) also explicitly off topic and b) completely different. Then it makes an observation about programming languages "using" UML diagrams (again the same confusion about what "use" entails, as well as a category error comparing languages to frameworks).

Then OP asks "how to architect these systems" - first off, what systems? But more importantly, this is much too vague: the question also Needs More Focus. We don't field questions about general approaches to roughly defined problems; we field questions about specific techniques that can be directly illustrated. Similarly, the problem description "deal with django project with UML tools" is far too vague; it isn't at all clear what "dealing with" should entail, nor what concrete problem OP is encountering. What should "UML tools" actually do - should they create diagrams, validate code against a diagram, something else? And why should UML tools be necessary for doing such "architecture"? (Let's keep in mind here that the entire concept of UML is not even as old as Python, and is only arguably as old as JavaScript!)

A question like this is in fact an unsalvageable mess, however much it might appear to be "valid" to reviewers (and off-site critics who fail to understand or care that this site is not a discussion forum). To me, the most questionable thing about the process is that it was deleted after 7 days: it would have been appropriate in my view to delete immediately, and the roomba should have gotten to it 2 days later anyway.

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    Re "the entire concept of UML is not even as old as Python": Yes, from ISBN 0-201-32563-2 (Addison-Wesley), page 4: "During 1996, Grady, Jim, and Ivar, now widely referred to as the three amigos, worked on their method, under its new name: the Unified Modelling Language (UML)" Oct 16, 2023 at 15:15
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    Can/ should we really expect reviewers to be able to have a technical understanding of C# code to the degree that they can tell, at a glance, that the first question should have been closed due to a typo? That sounds like a really, really high bar to me (though I do see it called out in the queue's meta FAQ, to be fair). I just thought the going principle of the queues was that you don't need to be a SME to review posts, and it feels like typo questions fly in the face of that.
    – zcoop98
    Oct 16, 2023 at 15:24
  • It may be a nod to the Gang of Four which refers to something in the history of the CCP. Oct 16, 2023 at 15:34
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    If one is casting close/reopen votes, one should have the technical understanding to determine whether they should be cast. If one doesn't, there's a skip button.
    – Kevin B
    Oct 16, 2023 at 15:37
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    @zcoop98 C# is one of C-like languages (which includes JavaScript) and quite a few people should be able to at least parse such a basic code that calls methods... If one only can read Python or Ruby syntax it is better to skip debugging questions in such languages... Also for the linked question missing arrow syntax portion should be familiar to people from more than just C-like languages (langdev.stackexchange.com/questions/570/… shows arrow syntax for languages like PHP, Haskel, Swift...) Oct 16, 2023 at 17:57

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