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Should reproducible questions that become non-reproducible be closed and/or downvoted?

For example, I answered question Error using Google Studio Formula with Case back in 2020 and it was closed today (probably due to a request in SOCVR) and my answer was downvoted (probably to facilitate deletion by Roomba). However, the question was reproducible and not caused by a typo at the time of writing the answer. Google seems to have updated underlying syntax and the documentation. The documentation no longer says what's quoted in my answer and the code no longer produces the same error.

Another example: was recently deprecated. At least one user wanted to close all questions, since they're no longer reproducible.

Does the community think such questions should be closed? If so, should they also be downvoted (to facilitate deletion)?

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    If the question was reproducible at the time of asking then it should not be closed.
    – Dharman Mod
    Oct 8, 2023 at 19:26
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    Even now it appears the that problem is reproducible from what I'm reading. The close voter has stated it's not reproducible due to a syntax error; that isn't what non-reproducable means... It's also not a typo. It's more that the user hasn't read the documentation, or made assumptions about it (perhaps due to how CASE works on other languages).
    – Thom A
    Oct 8, 2023 at 20:56
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    No one should be downvoting an answer solely or largely to facilitate deletion by Roomba. Oct 8, 2023 at 21:17
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    Is this question about that specific question (was thinking of leaving an answer). After some digging it looks like the CONTAINS_TEXT function was (always?) supported at the time, thus as noted above - the "Invalid Formula" error message was Not Reproducible. Here is a YouTube video from 2019 where it worked as expected. I also checked my answers - there is one from November 2020 that shows that the CASE statement used in that question should work as expected.
    – Nimantha
    Oct 8, 2023 at 21:44
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    @ThomA - (left a comment above) As noted the issue is not Reproducible now (and it looks like nor was it at the time) - That CASE statement should have worked without the "Invalid formula" error, thus the issue is Not Reproducible or Caused by a Typo. "Invalid formula" is an place holder of sorts which seems to pop up as an other (something like if no other error messages fit use that error message)
    – Nimantha
    Oct 8, 2023 at 21:53
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    @Dharman: "If the question was reproducible at the time of asking then it should not be closed". Noted - in this case the "Invalid formula" error message is and was Not Reproducible or Caused by a Typo (after some research it looks like CONTAINS_TEXT was always supported). That error message looks like a generic message for any issues without a specific error message (such as no internet connection / change in data source schema / random bug, etc)
    – Nimantha
    Oct 8, 2023 at 22:00
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    @Nimantha IMHO you are miss using the NRorCbT close reason. Maybe need MVE or needs detail. Or maybe not closable at all. Oct 8, 2023 at 23:28
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    @Nimantha I've read your comments (both here and on the linked Q&A). I stand by mine Oct 8, 2023 at 23:33
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    @chrisneilsen, Yes, I had previously voted to close as Needs Details or Clarity and it's the first comment that I had left on that respective question, requesting for a [mre]. That said reproducing that formula at the time (as well as the present), would not result in that error message (it was a temporary issue that is not reproducible, and it's not clear exactly why - perhaps client side such as with internet connectivity, data source schema change, connectors (there are 800+) or server side in the form of a change in the codee base). The formula worked and works as expected
    – Nimantha
    Oct 8, 2023 at 23:50
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    @Nimantha Thank you for the research. Assuming all facts you quoted is true, what you're saying is not that it was not reproducible, but you're saying it was not 100% reproducible and the reason it was not reproducible is not the reason I gave in my answer, but that probably and I quote "perhaps client side such as with internet connectivity, data source schema change, connectors (there are 800+) or server side in the form of a change in the codee base". In that case, I believe that makes a excellent answer. Do you believe all questions which are not 100% reproducible be closed?
    – TheMaster
    Oct 9, 2023 at 1:48
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    @Nimantha I think we're deviating more from this meta question to that specific question. I believe it was reproducible at that time, as seen in the screenshot of the asker with the exact code, whether 100%reproducible by all users - probably not - due to the reasons quoted by you. Whether a different close reason is applicable...Maybe- but personally I don't think so. Regardless, I want to stick to the question: If a question, which was reproducible(produces 'invalid formula') becomes non-reproducible-due to whatever reason(here, you say it's updates by Google), should it have been closed?
    – TheMaster
    Oct 9, 2023 at 2:25
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    @NoDataDumpNoContribution It's next to impossible to say when Google updated what. They don't add any version tags.
    – TheMaster
    Oct 9, 2023 at 6:34
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    I just searched for version information on this software (support.google.com/looker-studio/?p=relnotes) and saw that they make new releases roughly every week (or more often). The natural version information would then probably simply be the date. It's automatically added to all contributions, so it's fine. Oct 9, 2023 at 6:34
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    @TheMaster "It's next to impossible to say when Google updated what." We could only limit the range to somewhere between 2020 and 2023. Given that people can hardly download and use older versions for themselves, this question and answer have outlived their usefulness somewhat. But trying to close or delete it for some obscure reason is bending the rules. Maybe a new close reason "really, really outdated" or similar might be in order but would need to be discussed first. Oct 9, 2023 at 6:38
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    @Dharman Would you like to add a answer explaining your rationale for your stand? We have two answers "for" closing/deletion, but nothing "against" closing/deletion, except your comment.
    – TheMaster
    Oct 10, 2023 at 0:48

2 Answers 2

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If something becomes not reproducible, it is not reproducible.

The simple fact that a new technology, language version etc. comes out that obviates an old problem, does not cause the problem to "become not reproducible". As long as the older version can be installed and run, the new technology can be ignored etc., there is still a problem of potential interest to people who must maintain legacy systems. (Of course, we should take efforts to make it less likely that people who have a genuine problem with a new version, get mistakenly directed to wrong advice that pertains to an older version.)

However, for a web API that has been completely replaced, none of that logic applies. If, say, the server has started publishing a set of /v2/ endpoints while still supporting /v1/, then there is still a legacy system to talk about. But if they patched what happens when using /v1/, then it doesn't do anybody any good to talk about the problem that used to exist and be reproducible. It simply isn't any more. The general public simply doesn't have access to the system that reproduced the problem any more, so it's clearly "not reproducible" and doesn't add value to the site.

Remember that the goal is to help people solve practical problems. No matter how outdated the technology is, a problem can still be "practical" - tons of business still runs on COBOL. But a problem that requires a time machine to demonstrate is not ever practical.

Similarly, we should be getting rid of Google Contacts API questions as long as the API is not actually available. They are noise that can only possibly clutter search results.

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    I read what you say but I still haven't found how to handle such questions from your answer, IMO. Oct 10, 2023 at 8:30
  • 1. Do we know for sure that Contacts API is never coming back? Yes, this is how Google usually does things - never reinstates a sunset api. Are we believing Google's history to predict the future? 2. Closing and deleting all the questions: Is this worth the effort? What do we gain? You yourself acknowledge that this will only possibly clutter search - Clutterring search is almost never a issue. Old error messages would almost never be repeated in new APIs. And search engines are usually smart enough to adapt - ranking question links lower, which people didn't find useful anyway.
    – TheMaster
    Oct 11, 2023 at 9:06
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    @TheMaster I can rephrase that; search will never be uncluttered. Because the knowledge base will never be uncluttered. It is one big beautiful extremely functional dumpster fire which grows way quicker than can be curated. It is quaint that people still try to remove freckles from it but it is energy better spent elsewhere. Like wading through a mountain of duplicate and off-topic questions trying to find something worth answering. Isn't that more concerning than a SAAS which was replaced or removed?
    – Gimby
    Oct 11, 2023 at 14:12
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(Assuming the tangle of tags is all sorted out, but that's Google being their usual terrible selves. Never trust a Google product to be supported beyond the next quarter.)

Questions that can no longer be replicated maybe should end up getting closed, but that doesn't make them bad questions as that matter was assessed when they were asked. If they were clearly effortful and answerable (and had reasonable answers including an accepted one) then the bias ought to be towards thinking that the question was a good one within the scope of that particular domain. I'm not particularly keen on closing them, but if it's very unlikely that they'll ever receive a new answer of any sane value then perhaps they should be. (In this case, it's sort of marking the question being archived and of historic value rather than something that's expected to be especially useful going forward.) Note that question topics can have a substantial half-life, perhaps because the questions are actually being asked as part of understanding someone's old code as part of a migration effort (transforming an old program whose intended effect needs to be replicated in currently supported systems); that's an entirely valid reason to ask new questions on the topic and to want to find old questions on it, even though the subject of the topic is retired.

Such questions should not be voted down! Proposing voting down something that was well asked and well answered just because a third party decided to churn their API naming? That would be terrible! Against the ethos of this site. Wash your mouth out with soap! (Or worse, SOAP.)

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    The ethos of the site is to sort what is useful and practical to the top. It has nothing to do with rewarding or punishing the authors of that content. Oct 9, 2023 at 8:58
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    @KarlKnechtel Indeed, but I don't see this answer as contradicting that statement. It does not talk about rewards or punishment. The content was useful, and it was rated appropriately. Now, for reasons entirely unrelated to the content itself, it can no longer be used. The content has not become lower-quality, so there is no reason to downvote it. If the resolution of this discussion is indeed to remove this content, there is absolutely no requirement that a single downvote be cast in the process; it can be done entirely with close and delete votes.
    – Ryan M Mod
    Oct 10, 2023 at 1:19
  • Your point about understanding what a no-longer existent system used to do is a very good one. I wonder how we could balance the concerns about polluting search results for the systems that do exist today with preserving that content somewhere accessible.
    – Ryan M Mod
    Oct 10, 2023 at 1:27
  • @RyanM my understanding of "quality" includes utility. Oct 10, 2023 at 4:52
  • @RyanM it can be done entirely with close and delete votes. I'm sure you would agree that the same ends can be brought about much easier with downvotes rather than the delete votes.I also believe downvote is the most commonly used method to bring about deletion wherever Roomba is possible. Also, External search engines aren't bad. If a question is never visited or if it is visited and people come back and choose a different question, I believe those links would automatically rank less -not to mention the old errors message txt may never come up and therefore never searched in the first place
    – TheMaster
    Oct 10, 2023 at 10:32
  • "I'm sure you would agree that the same ends can be brought about much easier with downvotes rather than the delete votes" in some cases, yes, of course; it's a shortcut that people use because it does work. I'm at least less concerned about the cases where that's significantly easier than just closing and deleting it (e.g., no upvoted or accepted answers). Also, if there's a clear consensus in favor of it, it could be pretty easily done with moderator assistance, as we have unlimited close/delete votes and can close/delete unilaterally.
    – Ryan M Mod
    Oct 10, 2023 at 11:21
  • @RyanM Are you suggesting we mod flag for posts that should be closed whenever we run out of CVs? :-)
    – TylerH
    Oct 11, 2023 at 13:32
  • @TheMaster One potential issue is that external search engines don't really care about our up/downvote system. They care about their own page rank calculation, which will depend primarily on things like inbound links. They have no way to appreciate the semantics that we assign to the vote tally number. Oct 11, 2023 at 14:16
  • @KarlKnechtel Are you sure net votes/score are primarily determined by us, without search engines? My belief is popular questions/popular keywords in questions/answers creates higher seo ranks and therefore more visits to that question and therefore more voting on such questions and higher score. I'm sure you would agree that, If I were to look through your answers for the highest scoring posts, that they are more popular with high views, but not necessarily your most valuable(high quality) post. You propose quality∝score. While that may hold, keyword/popularity∝score holds much better.
    – TheMaster
    Oct 11, 2023 at 15:03

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