-27

The reason is, recently a FAANG company asked me for my Stack Overflow profile. But I have asked some questions recently that may appear basic.

Sometimes, it may be due to me not using that feature, or that I just use one method in a standard way, but after a while, I wonder what are the basic reasons for it.

It turned out after close to 10 hours of interviews, the interviewers and manager decided that I am suitable for the job. However, when the candidacy was presented to the VP, it seems that within a few minutes, he rejected the offer.

It was possible that he clicked into my Stack Overflow profile, and saw some basic questions recently. Sometimes I also ask question that doesn't give a quick 10 points with a quick answer, so some users appeared to quickly downvote it, making it seem like a bad question.

I have noticed some people from day 1, they appeared to use one account only for answering, and use another account for asking questions. (For example, for 8 or 10 years, the user only asked one question or zero questions? That doesn't seem realistic.) If they separate it this way, when they present their Stack Overflow profile, it seems they provide nothing but answers, and it only points to a "hire". I feel this is shallow, but sometimes it is shallow in the real world, as somebody may only have 3 or 4 minutes to judge you.

So the question is: can I divide my account into two parts, one for answers only and one for questions only? Or else, I may need to start from ground zero and use an account that is only for answering. I also found I could not delete some questions because the system says, "enough users have spent some time on this question so now it cannot be deleted", so I cannot trim my account to look any better.

33
  • 21
    not that I'm aware of. But also, it's totally realistic to have 2-3k answers and very few questions without running multiple accounts. Don't think I'd be upset if i got rejected from a company for simply asking a question, that's quite the red flag.
    – Kevin B
    Commented Sep 6, 2023 at 19:54
  • 1
    I guess unless the person has no question much at all. Otherwise while reading a book or video to learn something new: React, Angular, Vue, many people have questions and teachers have told students in a class, "there is no question that is a dumb question" to encourage student to ask questions. Not having any question is strange to me, but I suppose you can say there are such people Commented Sep 6, 2023 at 19:56
  • 4
    Personally, I have no reason to ask questions. That's what debugging is for. If you have the curiosity and desire to break the problem down into it's simplest components... there's no reason to ask a question, you can identify the problem every time.
    – Kevin B
    Commented Sep 6, 2023 at 19:57
  • 1
    If you have no reason to ask a question, what is StackOverflow for? Commented Sep 6, 2023 at 19:58
  • 4
    I used it as a learning tool early on by solving other people's problems, now i just curate.
    – Kevin B
    Commented Sep 6, 2023 at 19:59
  • 5
    I've also never asked a question on SO. I've had plenty of questions, and almost always the answer was already here. Commented Sep 6, 2023 at 20:05
  • 7
    I'm only giving my own personal opinion of asking. I see it as pointless for me to do, not as a general rule for everyone. As an example, I couldn't imagine how I'd manage to accumulate 1400 questions.... but you're certainly not the only member who has accomplished that. Great answers can't exist without questions to host them.
    – Kevin B
    Commented Sep 6, 2023 at 20:05
  • 8
    "Sometimes I also ask question that doesn't give a quick 10 points with a quick answer, so some users appeared to quickly downvote it, making it seem like a bad question." This demonstrates a complete and fundamental misunderstanding of the site. The questions that "give a quick 10 points" are often among the worst on the site, and it is a constant struggle to get them properly closed and downvoted before someone can come along and "help" the OP with an "answer" that makes the site worse. Commented Sep 6, 2023 at 20:14
  • 3
    Aside from that, from what I can tell, it has been almost a year since you asked an undeleted question. You also present no evidence for your hypothesis, and you fail to make a convincing case for why, if you are worried that the profile demonstrates lack of relevant competence on your part, we should help you hide this. Commented Sep 6, 2023 at 20:16
  • 5
    "Otherwise while reading a book or video to learn something new: React, Angular, Vue, many people have questions and teachers have told students in a class, "there is no question that is a dumb question" to encourage student to ask questions." Yes, that is the right attitude for a supervised learning environment where there is a specific person present who is responsible for explaining whatever confuses you on the fly. It is not appropriate to bring to a collaborative effort to build a high-quality reference library. That said, question difficulty has absolutely nothing to do with quality. Commented Sep 6, 2023 at 20:18
  • 5
    "I hope to make my profile look better." Sure. My point is that this has nothing to do with the goals of the site or the community. Commented Sep 6, 2023 at 20:43
  • 2
    I feel their system would be failing if this were the case and perhaps you are better off with a different company. But I am off-topic.
    – QHarr
    Commented Sep 6, 2023 at 21:18
  • 6
    it's fairly pointless to assume the rejection was due to something as inconsequential as having questions existing. It's possible, but it's no more useful than trying to guess who left a downvote on a question. Here you are, ready to separate a large amount of your contributions away from your main account... on a hunch. Knowing how to ask questions is a good skill to have, you should embrace that by improving the ones that get featured on your account.
    – Kevin B
    Commented Sep 6, 2023 at 21:19
  • 2
    "asked one question or zero questions? That doesn't seem realistic". I don't have another SO account, I just don't have any interesting questions. I think I'm a realistic person, but I can't prove it, of course. Commented Sep 6, 2023 at 22:52
  • 2
    As to the reason I have asked 5 questions, which in every single case I have answered myself by the way, is to document the problem. I don't have a lot of problems in my daily life that are worth documenting. The serial downvotes to all my questions, realistically, is another one of the reasons I don't submit questions. Nobody could downvote the thousand plus answers I have submitted. Commented Sep 6, 2023 at 23:00

2 Answers 2

15

I have asked some questions recently that may appear basic.

No problem. Basic questions are good. Experts return to the basics for any number of reasons. The important thing is that the question is well-crafted, on-topic and well-researched. Apparently some of your questions were viewed by the community to be low-quality and were downvoted, but on aggregate points you're among a tiny fraction of elite users in terms of rep, for whatever that's worth (not much as far as hiring is concerned, as I'll argue below, and that's OK).

It turned out after close to 10 hours of interviews, the interviewers and manager decided that I am suitable for the job. However, when the candidacy was presented to the VP, it seems that within a few minutes, he rejected the offer. [...] It was possible that he clicked into my StackOverflow profile, and saw some basic questions recently.

This seems presumptuous. I'm sorry you didn't get the position, and I understand the temptation to jump to conclusions in your post mortem. In my experience, though, candidate ability to accurately guess the reason for their rejection is low. I've been on both sides of the hiring table, and it'd be shocking to me if the determination was made on a few-minute glance at your SO profile. Do you have any evidence that this occurred? Rejections are normally due to interview performance, previous work experience or luck (another candidate presenting better and/or having a more impressive CV, the role being adjusted, budget reasons, etc).

Looking at it from the company's perspective, 10 hours of interviews is a huge investment. It's difficult and expensive to hire decent engineers. If the company truly put that much weight on Stack Overflow question quality, and are making that determination based on a few-minute analysis, wouldn't they save their team a day's worth of work and look at that deal breaker up front? On the other hand, if they were on the edge and this small factor was the straw that broke the camel's back (I don't think this happens, but for sake of argument), most likely they'd want to follow up and ask for clarification rather than toss away all their effort over something that might have a reasonable explanation.

If they really care this much about SO and the company isn't happy with a 140k+ rep SO user, they have extremely slim pickings remaining (unless they look for something other than rep, which would be impressively astute, but if that were true they wouldn't reject you based on a few bad questions either). ~650 people on the planet have more rep than you.

I have noticed some people from day 1, they appeared to use one account only for answering, and use another account for asking questions. (For example, for 8 or 10 years, the user only asked one question or zero questions? That doesn't seem realistic.)

That's me, although I've only been answering questions for ~5 years. I've almost always found my answers by searching the site, which I do a dozen times a day or so. Sometimes I don't find an answer and give up without bothering to ask. Does this factor make me a good fit for a job? I doubt it has any bearing one way or the other.

So the question is: can I divide my account into two parts, one for answers only and one for questions only?

I don't support this. This rewrites history in a confusing way and opens up avenues for abuse.

I may need to start from ground zero and use an account that is only for answering. I also found I could not delete some questions because the system says, "enough users have spent some time on this question so now it cannot be deleted", so I cannot trim my account to look any better.

If you accept my assertion that few hiring stakeholders care about SO in any capacity, then you're potentially wasting time that should be spent on other things. I suggest trying to think of other reasons you may have been rejected and acting on those, or maybe asking the company for feedback (but don't expect a reply).

If you're really that concerned about your SO profile's fitness (I wouldn't be), you could ask new, better questions and "bury" the low-scoring ones a bit. But be careful: asking low-quality questions with an obvious ulterior motive is not helpful for the community. Only ask if you really have a strong contribution to make to the community knowledge base, and it happens to be a win-win for you as well (again making the huge assumption that it even matters to employers).

If you have something useful to contribute to your low-scoring questions, you can self-answer them and draw attention to your growth as an engineer, keeping in mind the above caveat about ulterior motives.

Regardless of how companies may perceive your SO profile, consider owning those questions you're embarrassed about instead of trying to hide them. If a company rejects you because of a few poorly-received questions on a programming website, you've dodged a bullet.

1
  • 1
    The community is smart, asking multiple obvious inferior questions, with the intent to answer them will only result in those questions being not well received. There is no way to ask multiple high quality, well received questions, at a pace that can offset a past history of asking inferior questions unless it happens organically. If I were analyzing a user’s profile I would look at the questions they ask throughout time, probably focusing on questions, that didn’t get a lot of views as a way to judge a user’s ability to do critical problem solving. Commented Sep 7, 2023 at 8:52
6

If there is a way, the method would be using the contact us form. This isn't something you can do on your own or something the mods can do directly, they'd just be escalating it to CM's anyway or rejecting it outright, if this is something CM's have already addressed.

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .