-15

I'm rather mystified by the pushback on Why did Python argparse stop documenting nargs=REMAINDER?.

It's been accused of requiring opinion-based answers, though it does not (simply pointing to documented reasons and/or discussion and giving a brief summary is a fine answer to the question) and also of not even being programming related, which I have just addressed with:

To address the "closed because not related to programming" issue: I am a bit mystified as to how someone could consider API documentation, and in particular deliberately "undocumenting" part of a public API without deprecating it, not related to programming. The answer is is likely to bear directly on how a developer answers clearly programming-related questions such as:

  • Is the API broken in some way for my purposes, and does this imply that my code that uses it also broken?
  • Should I look for a replacement for this API?
  • Should I continue to use this API in new code? After all, it hasn't been deprecated.
  • Should I be converting existing code that uses this API to use something else?

Can someone explain to me what is leading people to believe that the question is not programming-related? Do I need to include detailed justifications such as the above in all questions about documentation?

17
  • 22
    Why an entity decided to change their web page in a certain way isn't a programming problem.
    – Kevin B
    Aug 28, 2023 at 1:28
  • 13
    Put another way, the information you're looking for isn't actually related to the website. There's certainly a question hidden in there that can be pulled out of what you wrote, but asking for the motivations of the documentation changing the way it did... is just a side effect of what you're looking for.
    – Kevin B
    Aug 28, 2023 at 2:03
  • 2
    I am further mystified by why this question is so massively downvoted. Is it off-topic? Is there some reason it should not be asked? Is it not possible to answer it? (The current answer seems to do a decent job of answering it.) ¶ I may be wrong about this, but I get the feeling that people here are getting more inflamed with passion about whether they like SO question to which this refers than feeling that answers to this can't help bring clarity to the situation.
    – cjs
    Aug 29, 2023 at 3:56
  • 1
    @KevinB I don't see why you bring web pages into this; publishing API docs on the web instead of, say, in a book, is not exactly unusual or unacceptable. My question is about why the developers explicitly thought it was best not to document part of the API that is not deprecated; that it was there and removed is a key indicator that this was an explicit decision.
    – cjs
    Aug 29, 2023 at 7:12
  • 5
    @cjs On Meta, voting works differently. What baffles me is how many long-term high-rep user's aren't even aware of that.
    – Dan Mašek
    Aug 30, 2023 at 14:14
  • 1
    @DanMašek Apparently SO isn't aware of it either, since hovering over the up- and down-vote buttons on this very question gives me "This question shows research effort; it is useful and clear" and "This question does not show any research effort; it is unclear or not useful," respectively.
    – cjs
    Aug 30, 2023 at 17:20
  • 3
    @cjs they are very much aware, it just isn't a problem that they've decided to do anything about.
    – Kevin B
    Aug 30, 2023 at 17:48
  • @KevinB Well, now I have to decide whether I believe a couple of unknown (to me) random people I don't know on the Internet, neither of which have provided a shred of support, evidence or references for what they say, or the official documentation of the site. I don't think it's going to be a hard choice to make.
    – cjs
    Aug 31, 2023 at 6:58
  • 2
    @cjs It’s documented in the help center on Meta in the "Voting is different on meta." section. That said, people tend to stretch that very far well beyond tagged or untagged feature proposals and I don’t see this question falling into either category. Aug 31, 2023 at 7:36
  • @MisterMiyagi Thanks for the reference! That's quite clear that voting is not different ("For most posts, votes reflect the perceived usefulness: well-written, well-reasoned, well-researched posts tend to get more attention and more upvotes") except for posts tagged feature-request, which this is not (and should not be).
    – cjs
    Aug 31, 2023 at 7:40
  • 3
    That doesn’t change the fact that people use votes the way they want to. 😉 it doesn’t really matter if you decide to just not believe what you want to not believe, it will continue to be what it is regardless.
    – Kevin B
    Aug 31, 2023 at 7:42
  • 1
    @KevinB As they should. But it would be helpful if people downvoting a question that is (at least arguably) reasonably well researched and clear if they explained what their disagreement with it is. Is it actually unclear in some subtle way? Do people disagree that I should be schooled on what's people think is wrong with the original question? Even a comment saying, "I don't like this, I don't like you" would at least give me feedback indicating that there's nothing I can change about questions like this to avoid being massively downvoted.
    – cjs
    Aug 31, 2023 at 7:46
  • 1
    I mean, I did leave a comment with my reasoning, a bunch of people upvoted it, so you could look at that information to conclude that’s the reasoning behind most of them.
    – Kevin B
    Aug 31, 2023 at 7:51
  • 1
    @KevinB I am loath to conclude that people are seeing a question, an answer they agree with, and thus feel the need to downvote the question that produced a good answer. Are they really that irrational? (Also, that looks like an answer; why is it a comment? Also also, I did respond as to why your answer appears not to make sense; are API docs on the web somehow different from API docs in a printed manual? Are API docs not a key part of the library?)
    – cjs
    Aug 31, 2023 at 7:57
  • 2
    There is very little reason to go on a crusade regarding how voting works on meta. It doesn't matter what people say, it doesn't matter what is written down. The only accurate description is "it's subject to too many variables to list". I personally judge a meta post by how it is answered. If it gets good useful answers, it's a good meta post. Even if it sits at -50.
    – Gimby
    Aug 31, 2023 at 7:58

3 Answers 3

5

It's been accused of requiring answers based opinion, though it does not (simply pointing to documented reasons and/or discussion and giving a brief summary is a fine answer to the question)

My reasoning at the time was that it's not reasonable to expect reasons for this kind of change to be documented or publicly discussed.

However, I managed to look up actual documentation of a reason, and I see that someone else found essentially the same thing and posted it as an answer. Unfortunately, it's really all you're going to be able to get in this case: it was removed from documentation because it's seen as buggy, and it wasn't deprecated because the whole thing is somewhat legacy status. (My personal recommendation is to look for a third-party library such as Click.1)

That said - just because it's answerable doesn't make it, in my mind, a suitable, on-topic question:

I am a bit mystified as to how someone could consider API documentation, and in particular deliberately "undocumenting" part of a public API without deprecating it, not related to programming.

What the documentation says (or doesn't) about the feature is a question about programming.

What the documentation author thought about the need to document the feature, is certainly not. Even if they wrote down their motivations somewhere, we can't do anything about the removal. Therefore, in the future, if you have reason to suspect that a removal was erroneous, then that is something that should be discussed with the people responsible.

Aside from the issue tracker, which has a label for documentation issues, you can try the documentation section of the official Python forum.

Whatever the author thought doesn't change how the code is actually used, and it doesn't change how to find out how the code is actually used. In short, knowing the reasoning does not enable you to solve a practical programming problem.

Is the API broken in some way for my purposes, and does this imply that my code that uses it also broken?

We cannot tell you what "your purposes" are, and we do not test code for you. If you want to know whether the code is broken, it's on you to test the cases you care about, use a coverage tool, use a fuzzing tool etc. If you want to know whether the API has a known limitation, that's a question you can ask directly, without reference to the history of the documentation.

Should I look for a replacement for this API?

Should I continue to use this API in new code? After all, it hasn't been deprecated.

Should I be converting existing code that uses this API to use something else?

These would all need to be recast to be more objective - "Is this API expected to stop working?" "Is this API suitable for task X?" "How can I [get the effect of this API] [with other, fully documented parts of the library]?"

But at any rate, it isn't appropriate to ask something simply because it would help you figure out the answer to something else. Just ask the "something else" instead.

Do I need to include details justifications such as the above in all questions about documentation?

No. For example, if you are directly asking us to clarify something that's said in the documentation, or give an example of a concept, that's self-evidently on topic. Similarly if the documentation motivated you to try something and you are confused by the result according to your understanding of the documentation.

1 Recently, there has been increasing recognition that the "batteries included" with Python are starting to "leak", and there has been an effort to clean things up. However, this is a very slow process - keeping in mind how much people complained about the 2->3 migration, even when they were given an extra five years out of the normal schedule to do it.

For what it's worth, I have my own ideas about how an argument-parsing library should work, and have considered throwing my hat in the ring in the past, too.

12
  • 1
    "My reasoning at the time was that it's not reasonable to expect reasons for this kind of change to be documented or publicly discussed." Of course it's reasonable to expect this from an open source project, particularly one like Python which has always promoted open discussion of changes. (Consider the whole PEP process, for example.)
    – cjs
    Aug 29, 2023 at 7:04
  • "..it was removed from documentation because it's seen as buggy..." That's arguable. Some on the bug thread believed it was buggy, others not. Taking into account all the comments, I read it as being removed from the documentation because, as I state in my answer, ""nargs=REMAINDER is very hard to document, and may not even fit well into the design of argparse, causing complex edge cases."
    – cjs
    Aug 29, 2023 at 7:04
  • 1
    "What the documentation says (or doesn't) about the feature is a question about programming." Ok, so read the question this way: "nargs=REMAINDER is not documented in the argparse API documentation, though there appears to be no intent to remove this API. What does this mean?" If it helps, feel free to change the title of my question to that."
    – cjs
    Aug 29, 2023 at 7:04
  • 1
    "Even if they wrote down their motivations somewhere, we can't do anything about the removal." Which is fine. I'm not asking to change the removal.
    – cjs
    Aug 29, 2023 at 7:05
  • 1
    "...if you have reason to suspect that a removal was erroneous, then that is something that should be discussed with the people responsible." I did not and do not suspect that the removal is erroneous. I expected that there's a good reason for it, but I did not know what it was thus my question.
    – cjs
    Aug 29, 2023 at 7:05
  • "Aside from the issue tracker, which has a label for documentation issues, you can try the documentation section of the official Python forum." Sure. I suspected that the documentation about this was out there, and thus I posted the question looking for answers that included links to it. Which I got. This is part of the purpose of SO. You could respond to the majority of questions on SO with, "go find the docs on the web" and close them, but we don't do that for very good reasons.
    – cjs
    Aug 29, 2023 at 7:06
  • "...it isn't appropriate to ask something simply because it would help you figure out the answer to something else. Just ask the 'something else' instead." I have at least five different "something else" cases to which the answer here could apply in different ways. I feel it's useful to have a question and answers which explore some of the core considerations in this so that they need not be partially repeated in scattered other questions. (As it turns out, I need not ask any of the other questions; I can work out what I need for all of them from the answers to this one question.)
    – cjs
    Aug 29, 2023 at 7:07
  • "...if you are directly asking us to clarify something that's said in the documentation...that's self-evidently on topic." Well, I was asking to clarify something that's not said in the documentation, which is especially interesting because it's clearly not forgotten; it's something that was discussed in the docs and then removed.
    – cjs
    Aug 29, 2023 at 7:07
  • 1
    I think the whole issue here is that you're getting hung up on the technicalities of the question format, rather than interpreting the question as charitably as possible and answering that. Next time you have a bunch of points like this, try assuming for a moment that the OP agrees with those points and see how your interpretation of the question changes. Writing questions is hard; just because someone didn't write it as well as you think it could have been written does not mean that there isn't a good and useful question there.
    – cjs
    Aug 29, 2023 at 7:07
  • (I realise this is a huge slew of comments; if they would be better as an answer here addressing this answer, please let me know.)
    – cjs
    Aug 29, 2023 at 7:08
  • 2
    "That's arguable. Some on the bug thread believed it was buggy, others not." - Yes, but "it's buggy" appeared to be the reasoning specifically of those who argued to stop documenting it - at least as I read the discussion. Aug 29, 2023 at 17:45
  • I think it's pretty clear from his earlier posts that paul j3 does not feel the code is buggy; he feels the code works as designed and the design is "buggy," ____ Nor did either of the two developers who submitted the change to remove it from the docs, miss-islington and Raymond Hettinger, suggest that it was buggy. So I agree with you that it's arguable, but disagree with your conclusion that "bugs" in the sense of the original poster, rather than "that's the only way this design can work," is the problem.
    – cjs
    Aug 30, 2023 at 17:33
1

I think these kinds of closure are throwing out the baby with the entire bathtub.

Technical documentation ultimately says how to program and as such is strongly programming related. Especially if the documentation is part of a language reference that says how a program should behave, it is directly equivalent to actual observed behaviour of a program. A content change of such documentation has direct implications for programming.

Yes, there is a chance that Dustin the Docs Dude had a bad day and pressed their secret happy unicorn Emacs key combination accidentally in Vim while sneezing real hard, causing a macro to run that delete-commit-push-approve-merge'd it directly to main. But let's be realistic; this is the time of version control, reviews, emails and discussion boards, and the library/language under discussion has a good track record of, well, keeping track with records of technical reasons for changes. Even if there is absolutely no sensible reason to it, that is also useful information.

The question in question actually does a good job of being neutral and objective. It does not ask about Dustin the Docs Dude; it asks about the docs. It does not speculate that the change was in error nor challenges the people responsible. That the question asks in active first person ("my code", "Should I ...", ...) instead of using passive voice to eliminate mention of a circumstantial agent is – at worst – a reason to edit.

2
  • 1
    This isn't a question about technical documentation though. It's a question about why the authors of said documentation chose to curate a specific part of a specific page the way they did. It belongs on the Python mailing list or whatever place changes to the Python documentation are discussed. "Is the documentation on fooing the bar wrong" is a valid question for Stack Overflow. "Why did the documentation maintainers choose not to include an example of how to foo a bar" is not.
    – TylerH
    Aug 31, 2023 at 14:53
  • @TylerH The question does not ask about the documentation maintainers, nor about the presence or absence of an example. Aug 31, 2023 at 15:44
0

If you're using that API, it's most certainly programming related. You gave four very clear bulleted points supporting why the answer could affect your programming. For example, an argument disappearing from the docs could mean it's being deprecated, using it could have unintended side effects, and perhaps someone more familiar with the API would have some insight.

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .