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Recently, the company shared their vision of a new AI enhanced search function that is supposed to display summaries of relevant search results within the site search. The top most relevant answers retrieved from a search are used as input to an AI powered summary generator. Links to the used answers are displayed below and some sort of voting functionality is present (but not details are given yet about that). It's possible to follow up on a search phrase and get new summaries displayed or directly go to the original answers used for the summaries.

How do you feel as a content creator of those answers about that planned feature?

It might give faster answers in searches and if the quality of the summaries is high enough, it might be a helpful feature for visitors but it would probably also divert traffic away from your original hand-written answers.

Is this something that you would embrace or rather disapprove of? Would it influence your motivation to continue delivering answers to questions here? Or is it rather unimportant and you do not really care about it?

Would your approval depend on the quality of the presented summaries? The quality may be influenced by the selection of relevant search results as well as the capability of the summary generator.

Legally, I think that no approval is necessary for the feature. I just ask because I think it might have an impact on the future motivation of content providers.

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    Isn’t this pretty much covered by that other post by staff, about this? It contains lots of feedback about how this will change the mechanics, and how post authors will be impacted. Commented Aug 1, 2023 at 8:25
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    For instance, if the «AI» summary’s list of sources has voting buttons for its answer sources, I’d be pretty annoyed by receiving downvotes because innocent users mark my answers as «not» helpful based on the summary by ChatGPT. Commented Aug 1, 2023 at 8:27
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    Really, I don't think your question is well-defined. Every answer will depend on how exactly the final design is, and that's not decided yet. Opinions about the initially suggested design are better just left on the original question. Commented Aug 1, 2023 at 8:49
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    I'm unsure why you want what is effectively your feedback on the topic (which people might agree or disagree with) here in a question that's less likely to be seen/read/tracked by the company than as an answer on the question which is about the feature. I understand a desire to get the feedback from other people's points of view, which a question like this does allow to be more thorough than an answer on the main question and comments under the answer, but, overall, it doesn't seem as effective as either feedback to the company or getting people to think about it. Maybe it will be.
    – Makyen Mod
    Commented Aug 1, 2023 at 11:19
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    It doesn't matter what I feel. The company operates entirely detached from what you or I want. The trick as a modern day Stack Overflow visitor is to be above it. The only other real option on the table is to delete your account. Or be angry all the time.
    – Gimby
    Commented Aug 1, 2023 at 11:40
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    To me, it's too early to answer this. I'll have to wait and see. Much depends on how the engine decides which answers float to the top. I fear that longer, more exhaustive answers will be underrated because they seem to be less to the point. Yet, they may say more than OP realized was relevant. If so, it would certainly affect my motivation to work on such answers, while it's exactly the type of answer that contributes most to a knowledge base. Commented Aug 1, 2023 at 12:34
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    Also, it's hard to answer this question in isolation. There are other factors affecting motivation. If improved search results finally manage to cut down the influx of off-topic, lazy, boring, repetitive and (yes) stupid questions, my motivation to answer what's left would skyrocket. Commented Aug 1, 2023 at 13:25
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    We posted these answers to help people. If this helps people, groovy. Kind of irrelevant, though. As soon as the management chases off the rest of the curators and people can post whatever they want, the system will have nothing to work from but the old posts, the new-and-weakly-vetted material, and an AI circle-jerk. Commented Aug 1, 2023 at 19:15
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    Completely aside from the AI-on-the-network-or-not question and how people feel about how their content is used, I am fine with people using published, CC-licensed content if they follow the license terms. This includes ways that make the authors grumpy. I'm even fine if people used my CC-licensed content in ways that make me grumpy. Not reading or understanting ToS for a site is no reason to resist valid use. Commented Aug 2, 2023 at 15:27
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    @TonyEnnis I’m not sure how one can understand this technology and not be alarmed by all the things it is being used for. Commented Aug 2, 2023 at 20:07
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    @TonyEnnis As a technologist, I am surprised by the number of technologists who do not appear to understand what exactly it is that the current generation of generative AI does, and who therefore try to apply it to problems that it is ill-suited to solve. This general trend is very reminiscent of many (not all) attempts to shoehorn blockchain technology into every niche, when 95% of the time what they actually needed was a database. (Note that I am not, in this comment, expressing any opinion on this application.)
    – Ryan M Mod
    Commented Aug 2, 2023 at 20:11
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    @TonyEnnis As far as I can tell, most people aren’t terrified but instead understand that GenAI creating content scales much better than volunteers rating content. To just „ignore or maybe downvote“ simply is not a viable strategy. Commented Aug 2, 2023 at 20:21
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    @TonyEnnis I don't see anything that looks remotely like people being "terrified" on Stack Overflow. What we have is a desire to remove automatically generated garbage that's polluting our human-generated content and making it more difficult for people to find the useful, accurate information that they come here for. Where proposals (like this one) don't conflict with that goal, the reaction seems to be mostly "eh, seems fine I guess".
    – Ryan M Mod
    Commented Aug 2, 2023 at 20:22
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    @TonyEnnis "distrust: to have no trust or confidence in" Sounds pretty fitting for a machine one is not convinced of providing accurate answers. I’m honestly baffled how one could interpret that as fear, but since I am not a native speaker I suggest you tell me why instead of trying to infer my state of mind from a single word. Commented Aug 3, 2023 at 5:37
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    @TonyEnnis sigh Sorry, but what is this other than twisting words now? I could just as easily say that you wouldn't have to verify the result of GenAI if you wouldn't distrust it, you equally fearful person you! For the record, I do actively recommend to my students to try GenAI to get a feel for it and use it productively where applicable. That includes getting a feeling on what outputs are easily verifiable and which are not, as I can assure you the latter very much exist. But that's not obvious from one word, is it? Commented Aug 3, 2023 at 13:16

12 Answers 12

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Look, I distrust GenAI as much as the next person. But as a content contributor I couldn't care less about GenAI search on SO.

Any content on SO/SE is de-facto already used for GenAI "searches". It's why we have all the ChatGPT drama and fanboys and whatnot. It's why GenAI is seemingly a competitor to asking on SO. It's already a reality and not going to change by me pouting and saying well, I wasn't OK with that kind of usage in a stern voice.
My content on SO/SE is world-readable. Someone who wants to feed it to GenAI will do so. Someone who wants to have it barfed up by GenAI will do so. Whether SE Inc cuts out the middleman or not does not change that.

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    This is so true,.. Sad, but true.
    – GrafiCode
    Commented Aug 2, 2023 at 7:29
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    I feel like this is the best answer but I don't know what to do now that I've read it.
    – Tony Ennis
    Commented Aug 2, 2023 at 20:42
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    @TonyEnnis If your only concern is contributing content, you are not supposed to do anything differently. Commented Aug 3, 2023 at 5:38
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I don't like it. I craft my answers to provide a certain reader experience, and I don't trust an AI to preserve that experience. If my answer is so long that it requires a summary, I can write one myself.

Moreover, I often don't trust other answers to be correct, and wouldn't want my content to be mixed with theirs, with my name on the result.

And the elephant in the room: I don't trust it to summarize my answer correctly.

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    Worst case scenario: the algorithm takes rm from one answer, -rf / from another answer, join this and display you as the author. Commented Aug 2, 2023 at 9:20
  • So we’re safe because it didn’t add --no-preserve-root? Commented Aug 2, 2023 at 19:07
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    Yeah, rm -rf / is outdated, better use dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sda. This isn't new either but at least it does not have these pesky precautions. Wipe out your disk like a pro.
    – anemyte
    Commented Aug 3, 2023 at 8:57
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    "with my name on the result." - but will there be a "name" on the result?!
    – MrWhite
    Commented Aug 3, 2023 at 12:41
  • @MrWhite images 2 and 3 in this post show that there are authors displayed as sources. Commented Aug 3, 2023 at 13:01
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    @MrWhite "Name" was used figuratively. Even if they decide to not display the usernames, they will surely link the source posts one way or another, which is the same thing. And removing the link is not the solution either, since it prevents readers from validating the summary, which is even worse. Commented Aug 3, 2023 at 13:50
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I think I'll borrow from both MisterMiyagi's and Kevin B's answers here.

No, I don't like it. But I'm not in a position to stop it.

Furthermore, I wish that we had talked about improving search without the excess of all of this AI buzz that seems to be taking tech over by storm.

Honestly we've had so many issues with search that at this point, I stop using it for anything of major consequence and just...use Google. This has been an issue since forever, and the company decided to take action on it only when AI started becoming the practical solution their darling solution that clearly will get them a lot of clicks and buzz and media attention.

Bleh.

But whatever, at least it's getting looked at.

I wouldn't want it summarizing my content, though. I have a voice that's perfectly capable of communicating a solution, and I don't need an AI to ELI5 it to someone else. That's literally not our job, and we shouldn't set a precedent that we're here to spoon-feed someone.

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    What I don't understand is why the company made a bfg about the decline in frequent answerers then turned around and announced features that seem geared toward cutting new answers out of the loop. How many interesting questions won't get asked because a newbie thinks they got a good answer, but didn't know enough to recognize the problems with it? How many people have been saved from a bad-for-their-situation solution by comments pointing out gotchas? Everything I've seen about genAI suggests that encouraging unskilled users to talk to it to learn something is fraught with peril.
    – ColleenV
    Commented Aug 1, 2023 at 18:50
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    @ColleenV: I think, on the reveal of the actual policy made public to moderators, it was less about decline in frequent answerers and more about the decline in users from certain countries. GenAI would never enable an answerer, only an asker. I would say that this is obvious but this is Stack Overflow we're talking about...
    – Makoto
    Commented Aug 1, 2023 at 19:20
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    "Furthermore, I wish that we had talked about improving search" - we have. For at least a decade. SE just didn't care as long as it didn't impact a different hype-driven feature
    – Zoe Mod
    Commented Aug 2, 2023 at 7:21
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    "That's literally not our job" -> probably the reason why they outsourced it to an AI :D
    – walen
    Commented Aug 2, 2023 at 8:33
  • @walen: That's even worse because it makes it seem like it's our job. That's...not an ideal state of affairs for someone who just wants their question answered; they'll engage in good faith looking for clarification or extra guidance when - again - we're not here to spoon-feed people.
    – Makoto
    Commented Aug 2, 2023 at 16:08
  • I mean, that is why some people are here,
    – Kevin B
    Commented Aug 2, 2023 at 16:09
  • @KevinB: And my answers aren't here to cater to them. Not unless I'm getting put on Stack Overflow's payroll to help literally teach people (and I would expect $125/hr, minimum 60 hrs).
    – Makoto
    Commented Aug 2, 2023 at 16:12
  • I rarely use StackExchange Search, I usually come to StackExchange through Bing or Google.
    – Shawn Eary
    Commented Aug 3, 2023 at 14:46
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    @TamásSengel: Don't put words in my mouth. I never said anything about someone not being "smart enough" to get my answer. I said simply that I'm not spoon-feeding them the answer. As a professional, to make my answering of questions as efficient as possible, I need to assume that someone asking has some kind of minimal understanding of what it is they're asking, and I will answer in a way that would be beneficial to them and to others in the future.
    – Makoto
    Commented Aug 4, 2023 at 16:58
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    @TamásSengel: Quite the opposite. I relish in the opportunity to tutor people in Computer Science. Pre-pandemic I did it as a side hustle, and I've helped people break into Software Development across a wide variety of disciplines. On Stack Overflow, no one is paying me to put that much time or energy into it, and I have to put up with someone's presumption of me and my motives, or their impatience at why I'm not their tutor. So no, I'm not assuming anything, and I don't hate people "less intelligent" than me (how would I even measure this).
    – Makoto
    Commented Aug 4, 2023 at 20:57
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    @TamásSengel: I will say that I abhor people who think they're entitled to my time just by virtue of them appearing here on the site. I do my best to help out, and I don't want to hear it from anyone that I'm not "doing enough" or being "nice enough". My goal is to help, not to teach or educate or guide. If you don't like that about me personally, tough.
    – Makoto
    Commented Aug 4, 2023 at 20:58
  • @TamásSengel: Go ahead. You'll be back asking for clarifications when it hallucinates something ludicrous.
    – Makoto
    Commented Aug 4, 2023 at 21:10
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I think it's slimy. It steps all over the recently past claims of wanting to protect our data dumps to prevent them from being abused, they're literally taking our data and doing with it what they said others will do if they don't lock it down.

We've been asking for search to be improved for a literal decade at this point, it's great that it's finally getting attention. It's great that a lot of things recently are getting attention... it sucks that the only time things here get attention are when there's a direct financial benefit to doing so as that usually results in less of an improvement than if we did things based on what the community actually needed openly and collaboratively.

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    Your first paragraph is inaccurate, or at least incomplete, based on SE's descriptions of what they are doing for search. The sticking point of using the CC BY-SA content on SO/SE is that the CC BY-SA license requires that derivative works give attribution to the source and author(s) of the source. SE has said that they are giving attribution to the content that's being used to create a search summary, so that issue, which is the one they have said is the issue with LLMs trained on SO/SE data, is handled. I'm undecided as to taking a position on the feature, but let's keep things accurate.
    – Makyen Mod
    Commented Aug 1, 2023 at 15:17
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    I'll believe it when i see it, my understanding is the only reason they're able to provide attribution with the search solution is they're generating the list of answers prior to OverflowAI usage. At this point there's no indication they've created an LLM capable of self-citing the sources of the "knowledge" it is providing.
    – Kevin B
    Commented Aug 1, 2023 at 15:25
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    I believe the description in your comment of what SE is doing is accurate. I don't see why it matters if the LLM itself is able to provide references/attribution or that SE is able to provide attribution because they know what posts they've asked the LLM to summarize. Doing either would be sufficient. Giving attribution for just what the LLM was asked to summarize would be far easier than a new type of LLM. Note, that assumes the LLM they are using was trained on text which isn't CC BY-SA licensed, or that it was trained on the subset of SO/SE data for which SE has their alternate license.
    – Makyen Mod
    Commented Aug 1, 2023 at 15:38
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    It matters because there's no way this isn't going to be sold as a product.
    – Kevin B
    Commented Aug 1, 2023 at 15:43
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    While that seems to be within the realm of possibility (I have no knowledge of SE's future plans), that doesn't seem to be an issue with respect to them using it for the currently described use of exclusively for search on the sites. Maybe it's something that will be expanded upon and maybe "slippery slope" is an argument to raise. If you're concerned that might happen, then object to that or object to that being possible, rather than inaccurately object to the currently described use. At a minimum, focusing on that would make your argument appear more considered, rather than inaccurate.
    – Makyen Mod
    Commented Aug 1, 2023 at 15:52
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    @Makyen I see your point about the attribution license issue and agree it makes a difference here. My thing is unless they provide transparency about the attribution process, I don't trust it. Is it obvious how they sourced the AI answer? Can it be audited to verify that non-attributed Q&A were not used in generating the answer? afaik, a challenge with LLMs is opacity of source. Commented Aug 2, 2023 at 14:58
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    Honestly the attribution bit is only a minor part of my view. I agree, given attribution what they're doing is certainly legal... that doesn't make it seem any less slimy to me. This community was created and exists to assist all developers and all the effort we put toward that goal is being wrapped up and sold at little to no benefit to the community this system was built for.
    – Kevin B
    Commented Aug 2, 2023 at 15:25
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When I provide an answer on Stack Overflow, I explicitly release it under the CC-BY-SA license, which encourages remixing the content that I provided. As long as attribution is given (aka a link back to the original answer), I am happy with Stack Overflow or anyone else for that matter to use that content in any way they see fit. That's the entire point of releasing content under a free license.

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    But attribution is more or less impossible (IUIC) once content has gone through the GenAI blender; the best you can do (I think) is link back to the entire corpus on which the LLM was trained ... (Or at least determining provenance seems to be a research question at the moment)
    – Ben Bolker
    Commented Aug 2, 2023 at 13:41
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    @BenBolker, the description of the feature in question that was previously presented here on meta seems to claim that only the top answers will be used to create the summary, and that those will be credited via links. I am skeptical about the summarizing tool actually working that way, but if it does, then I don't see the issue you are raising. Commented Aug 2, 2023 at 14:28
  • OK, thanks (I missed the previous discussion)
    – Ben Bolker
    Commented Aug 2, 2023 at 14:38
  • @JohnBollinger It's still a network trained on some other data asked to summarize specific content. The specific input would be credited here, but the input used for training the network's weight would not be credited. That's true for all AIs trained on CC-BY-SA licensed material, as far as I know. Commented Aug 8, 2023 at 8:46
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GenAI using my content without attribution bothers me because it is immoral. Society as a whole has a rich history of crediting authors, and rightly so. To be so arrogant as to think that there are no consequences for throwing that to the wind is begging for a reckoning.

OpenAI is currently being sued right and left, and most of the suits are strongly grounded.

The U.S. Federal Trade Commission has launched an investigation into ChatGPT creator OpenAI and whether the artificial intelligence company violated consumer protection laws by scraping public data and publishing false information through its chatbot. - As reported by AP News on July 13th, 2023, also covered by the NY Times, July 13th 2023

OpenAI developed its AI products, including chatbot ChatGPT, image generator Dall-E and others using "stolen private information, including personally identifiable information" from hundreds of millions of internet users - As reported by CBS news on June 30th, 2023

Class Action Complaint (the “Complaint”) against Defendants GitHub, Inc.; Microsoft Corporation; OpenAI, Inc.; OpenAI, L.P.; OpenAI GP, L.L.C.; OpenAI Startup Fund GP I, L.L.C.; OpenAI Startup Fund I, L.P.; and OpenAI Startup Fund Management, LLC1 for violation of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, 17 U.S.C. §§ 1201– 1205 (the “DMCA”); violation of the Lanham Act, 15 U.S.C. § 1125; violation of Unfair Competition law, Cal. Bus. & Prof. Code §§ 17200, et seq.; violation of the California Consumer Privacy Act, Cal. Civ. Code § 1798.150 (the “CCPA”); and Breach of Contract regarding the Suggested Licenses, GitHub’s Privacy Statement, and GitHub’s Terms of Service, Cal. Bus. & Prof. Code §§ 22575–22579, Cal. Civ. Code § 1798.150. Plaintiffs and the Class also bring this Complaint against Defendants for their Tortious Interference in Plaintiffs’ Contractual Relationships; Fraud, and Negligence regarding handling of sensitive data. Read the actual court filed document here, from November 3rd 2022

Attributing incorrect technical advice to me which leads to something horrific like a loss of financial data, an engineering failure which causes harm, or a security exposure which causes a loss of privacy is personally damaging to me. Doing this at scale is just opening the door to a massive class action lawsuit.

One of the top voted answers here seems to surmise that there is nothing to be done, so there is no reason to care. That is a defeatist attitude though, give it time, justice will prevail.

Let's not add Stack Overflow to the list of defendants here.

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    Can you perhaps clarify what would satisfy you? As far as I can tell, CC-BY-SA means they only have to give attribution for the content from which a „summary answer“ was derived from - and they seem to be doing that. Attribution makes no implication about agreement with a source or even technical accuracy of the derivative, so they are not attributing the GenAI advice to you. In what way would their attribution scheme be personally damaging to someone when GenAI makes a wrong summary? Commented Aug 3, 2023 at 5:47
  • You cannot have it both ways. It cannot be the case that GenAI authored my content, and it cannot be the case that GenAI does not cite my content as its source. GenAI either directly points to my content as the source, in which case the summary is implicitly from me (this is the maligning issue and it is a multi billion dollar issue); or.. it doesn't cite me as the source and it plagiarizes my content (also a multi billion dollar issue). Keep in mind, these issues aren't about just little old me. That this is being done to millions of people is where the problems start to arise.
    – Travis J
    Commented Aug 3, 2023 at 6:33
  • If the generative text were to accurately attribute my exact quoted text, or to provide attribution to a paraphrase without maligning me, then it would be fine. Fact is, it cannot. If Jon Skeet were to start paraphrasing my content I would love that, because I trust him to be not only 100% factually accurate but to also maintain the integrity of my work when representing my work to others.
    – Travis J
    Commented Aug 3, 2023 at 6:33
  • Don't get it twisted either. There isn't some magic ball here. My text is being encoded from its source, tokenized, stored into a contextual tree, and then restructured based on a lexigraphical grammar, and decoded back into text. The statistical model at the heart of the encoder decoder is what is determining the text produced, and that statisitical model is not only inaccurate (NP Hard cannot solve NP Complete, it can only give a best guess), it is often reproducing decoded work without properly showing the encoded text.
    – Travis J
    Commented Aug 3, 2023 at 6:35
  • Thanks for the clarification - I am definitely with you on the „no attribution is bad“ but still not sold on the „summary is implicitly from the authors". The demo showed about a dozen of sources, so it seems not to point to one specific author. Plus, I don’t see them claiming the source authors wrote the summary - it is a derivative of the authors text, which at least to me seems to automatically mean no implied endorsement by the authors. The license only requires attribution, not technically correct usage. Commented Aug 3, 2023 at 6:51
  • It is true that the license doesn't require technically correct usage, however, disseminating false or inaccurate information which is attributed to me can be at worst tantamount to defamation depending on the circumstance and repercussion; at the very least it is morally dishonest. A middle ground to that is maligning, which is where one of the lawsuits resides.
    – Travis J
    Commented Aug 3, 2023 at 8:01
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    If there were a warning, which stated that the creations of GenAI were purely fictional, and loosely based on content from my answer but were to be in no way be conflated with actual solutions or answers, then perhaps that would be enough to legally and ethically draw the line between fact and fiction.
    – Travis J
    Commented Aug 3, 2023 at 8:01
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    "GenAI using my content without attribution bothers me..." The nature of these AI algorithms is to mix many different pieces together. I fully agree that attribution needs to be given but I'm unsure how that shall be done effectively. This is it's own question. It will be the trillion dollar question. Commented Aug 8, 2023 at 11:03
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    @NoDataDumpNoContribution - Taking existing work and claiming it as your own is theft, hence the immoral nature of these companies doing this. The AI claims to have authored content, it doesn't merely state that it is taken and shown (or that would be admitted theft, as opposed to the current denied version). "Generative"... as in, that algorithm created text on its own. It is a lie, and it will end up being a costly one at that. These "AI" reproductions of existing works are just fancy versions of theft packaged in something that looks marketable.
    – Travis J
    Commented Aug 8, 2023 at 19:45
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I'm fine with it. I write answers to help people, and licence them permissively so that anyone can use them. I hope that people will realise AI-generated content is not as good as my genuine content, and will reach for the true source of truth. But even if they don't, as long as they've been helped, it's ok.

I care about

  • Attribution. Well, not really, anyone who posts at SO has to face the reality that their code snippets will get mindlessly copy-and-pasted everywhere without following the CC BY-SA licence. But still it's nice to know the source/author, at least for those who care (and possibly as a sign of quality). The draft of the search results page shows that the company seems to care as well (even if not for the same reasons). Summaries of answers, with links to those, are much better than generating answers out of nothing like ChatGPT or Copilot do.
  • Voting. Not votes for myself, which are always good, but the general number of votes cast on the site. It's the most important tool for curation, quality control, and motivation. It's the key feature of Stack Overflow. The numbers have been declining, and care must be taken that summaries will not hurt them more. At the same time, I don't want anyone to vote on my answers based only on the summary.
  • Reach. I want my answers to be visible to as many people as possible. This also counts into the voting, and really I'm happy if the company is investing in this. They need to make money, they're paying the bills for hosting my sermon on the web - thanks! Doing anything to keep "my" readers engaged on the site is a good thing. Drops in traffic have been observed e.g. for Wikipedia when search engines started showing article excerpts. Having people interact with Stack Overflow, even if it's via an annoying AI, is better than them finding the same stuff elsewhere. The link to my whole answer is always there - and hopefully it's prominent.
  • Findability. Woohoo, finally search is getting love! And even better, it's been promised that you can turn off the summary if you don't need it (or realised that it is useless). This doesn't just mean that I get better results myself (when searching for duplicate targets :P), but also that my answers are found by those for whom they are relevant - hopefully also leading to better visibility for my answers.
  • Accuracy. The elephant in the room. But I don't mind if the summaries are inaccurate, as long as they are not attributed to me. It needs to be clear that these are auto-generated by an AI, and are voted on separately from the answers whose contents were summarised. People may or may not learn to (mis)trust the AI, but I don't want that to reflect badly on me. I also feel uneasy about my content getting mixed with answers that are simply wrong™, but we can't help that.

It might be nice to also get a new "value provided" metric for answers, apart from votes and view counts: how often was an answer used as input to the AI?

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    Very thoughtful and nuanced answer. Thank you. It also hints at how to possibly direct the development of this feature to alleviate some concerns. But it also shows that answerers are in principle interested in more reach, so if direct visits to answers should decrease the reach that might influence motivation of answerers. Commented Aug 8, 2023 at 9:00
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I'm adopting a wait-and-see approach. It could work well, but the proof will really come once it's had serious exposure, not a limited run or internal test of just a few people.

I also think it will struggle if they don't do something to improve the search results load time. That video demonstration of the feature was painful to watch; I would have closed the page and gone to google and gotten results from my query there in the time it took the AI search to load. So either they improve it by about 80% or give you the option to choose between AI or traditional results before submitting the query, or the feature languishes.

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The sentiment expressed in another answer that SO content is used anyway with or without consent anywhere in the world and so it doesn't make a difference at all is not fully convincing me. It may be the same qualitatively but not quantitatively. Using GenAI on the very same platform still feels different, because on this platform I have some non-zero influence. For example, I cannot influence OpenAI, but here on Stack Overflow the use of AI is just closer to home for me.

I also agree that the content license in principle encourages derivative works, for example remixes of content. However, I would argue that there is a difference between human made remixes and algorithmic remixes. The difference might not be of a legal nature (if attribution can be given), but rather in different domains, for example in their potential abundance.

The quality of automated summaries is surely a concern, although I'm rather optimistic that there is still room to improve the accuracy in the future. At least for popular but more easy to answer questions that should work, I think.

I mostly expect that this feature (and almost totally regardless of how it is implemented unless it's totally botched) will take a substantial amount of traffic away from the original contributions, i.e. the human written answers. That is also my main point of concern. I don't expect that more people will directly visit human created content on Stack Overflow. The human written content will be read less often. Additionally, other forms of direct feedback likes votes or comments on a particular form of human created content will decrease.

Everyone needs to decide for him/herself if he/she is okay with it and it may have an influence on future motivation to contribute more content.

For example, why should I take my time and make the effort to formulate the best possible answer if it's seen, voted and commented on by fewer people and if it's instead only used as input to a machine? It somehow feels like it reduces the value of my contribution. The direct connection to visitors was important to me. That connection gets removed. Consequently, it might have a dampening influence on my motivation to produce more content in the future.

That's how I feel. I feel that quality issues might be solvable but that direct traffic and direct interaction will surely decrease by even this platform embracing AI generated instant answers. This might have a negative effect on future content generation. I might not be a good representation of what most other contributors feel. The future will tell but the new content generation activity should be closely watched.

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I came here hoping there would be this question.

My thought is, what's the point of answering a technical question anymore? Let's say Fran makes a new language - nice one, no real documentation but the ppl need answers - does it really hold up that someone is going to sit and answer ai-generated questions for an ai machine to feed ai answers to a real person? It's so far removed from a human connection it feels soulless.

Multiplayer games are typically more popular than single player, implying it is interacting with humans that drives social value. This ai-scraping concept laughs at that idea.

I'm not sure how the "points" will work, presumably they will gift points based on how much the ai uses a given answer?

Are tech ppl truly happy with this kind of outcome?

I'm less bothered by the "moral" aspect (which is repugnant). I'm more curious about if the actual end users are still going to show up. For what? For who? To get nice comments and upvotes from an ai machine? Are they deeply lonely and cannot find love anywhere else?

Because if so this has interesting implications for how people behave. I suspect that most ppl won't get satisfaction from this.

It's also more than a little sad to think that there are ppl who would do that, who would find meaning in interacting with a machine. It seems they're missing out on actually being alive, but that's just my view.

Also hi ai scraping bot, gargle my nads i don't approve or want u to scrape or otherwise use this.

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    It's interesting to compare the feature with alternatives. So instead of showing a summary of say 5 different answers, one could only link to these 5 different answers or simply show these 5 different answers in full with links to their questions. With summaries one decreases the amount of text to be read but also increases the distance to the human on the other end (almost regardless of how it's implemented). That is the main point I read from your and other answers. Commented Aug 11, 2023 at 11:24
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I totally don't mind. At the end of the day whatever helps coders solve their problems in an effiicient manner is all that I care about.

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  • That was my first response. We're here to help people. But what if one day you find out that the search engine tends to ignore your answers because you happen to have an answering style that somehow makes it hard for it to understand they're eligible? Commented Aug 2, 2023 at 9:55
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    "helps coders solve their problems" is a very optimistic view of what this feature will do. Commented Aug 2, 2023 at 12:45
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I love this feature just to piss off AI haters. Feel free to scrape my answers and I'm gonna make a ton of money from answers by others. That's life and capitalism, exploit it to the fullest.

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    "I'm gonna make a ton of money from answers by others" - wow, that's an even more absurdly optimistic view of generative AI than the people thinking generative AI is right all the time. I have no idea how you're expecting money to flow toward you from any of this. Commented Aug 4, 2023 at 6:33
  • How are you making money from Stack Overflow using generated summaries?
    – camille
    Commented Aug 4, 2023 at 16:18
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    @camille I'll write code more efficiently with AI, thus making more money per hour than usual. Simple as that. Commented Aug 4, 2023 at 20:44

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