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As we previously shared, Prashanth Chandrasekar, CEO of Stack Overflow, is speaking at the WeAreDevelopers World Congress. You can check out this recap to learn more about some of the features presented earlier today. The full video of the CEO presentation is here (Prashanth's presentation starts around 11:01).

I want to provide the community with additional details and background into some of the features Prashanth demoed and goals shared during the event: an updated search and question-asking experience powered by AI and Generative AI (GenAI).

We’ve heard feedback that for many developers on Stack Overflow, finding a solution to their problem can sometimes take a while. We understand that many developers have found Stack Overflow search not always to be effective, often unable to find existing posts to address their problems. We also know that the results found can sometimes be abstract, lengthy, or advanced for the reader, making it hard for them to connect the dots about how this knowledge applies to their specific problem.

Through an updated semantic search experience, after a user searches or asks a question in the Stack Overflow search bar, we can leverage AI to provide a results summary that draws from multiple high-quality answers on Stack Overflow, in addition to providing the traditional search results list of questions and answers. The traditional search results will also have improvements to the relevance of the search results listed. This updated search experience can help enable better discovery of existing content.

At a high level, we're retrieving the most relevant results from the community using semantic search, retrieving the top answers from each of those results, and summarizing the knowledge we provide. This is to minimize and reduce the likelihood of hallucinated responses and avoid posting AI-generated answers to Stack Overflow. Sources are included to provide credit and attribution to the original post authors that were used in the summary.

Below are some screenshots of the conceptual vision we have for the updated search experience. Note that these screenshots include some design updates we’re exploring on Stack Overflow.

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Sometimes a user may need a more personalized or detailed solution once they have their summary.

Users can continue the search by asking follow-up questions, building on top of the original question. From here, they’ll see another AI-summarized solution, and as they build their knowledge and possible solutions, they can get more specific in their query, adding in their code or what they’ve tried and making highly personalized search results. These follow-up questions and iterative search experience will help enable users to better understand how the content applies to their context.

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In the event a user is unable to find an answer that works for them, this may indicate that a new question needs to be asked to the Stack Overflow community.

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While the updated search will first try to find an instant answer, if an instant answer is not available, the user will then engage in a conversation to help them craft a high-quality question, helping to build new knowledge that’s discoverable and reusable in the future. The system will provide guidance and suggestions throughout the question-creation process and will also provide feedback on the quality of the question. Users can then choose to accept or reject the suggestions.

Ultimately, this updated search experience should result in fewer duplicate posts on Stack Overflow, provide a supportive onboarding of users through guided question-asking, and overall better quality of questions being asked on Stack Overflow.

Check out this video for more information about this updated search and question-asking experience.

If you’re interested in being part of alpha or beta testing for this experimental search tool over the next few months, you can register your interest at Stack Overflow Labs, our central hub to share experiments, demos, insights, and news – across all Stack Overflow products.

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    Are these going to be SO only or are these going to trickle down network wide over time? Commented Jul 27, 2023 at 12:26
  • 109
    Will there be any way to turn the summary off in user settings? (I would honestly just prefer an improved search feature without any LLM generated content)
    – DBS
    Commented Jul 27, 2023 at 12:38
  • 16
    Which AI is going to be utilised for this? ChatGPT-3.5, ChatGPT-4, Google Bard or other?
    – machine_1
    Commented Jul 27, 2023 at 13:11
  • 88
    The search looks nice, but why tack on GenAI assisted questions? It's only been a month since that failed spectacularly. Commented Jul 27, 2023 at 13:59
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    No comment on the feature in general as I'm probbly far from the intended audience and don't feel I need or want to use it. However, the shown python examples feel pretty useless as they only give a general answer ("use these methods") while the "gimme the codez" users who feel like the intended audience would want a copypastable piece of code solving their specific problem. If the GenAI doesn't provide them with a readymade solution or at least a concrete, specific example that is directly related to their problem, I think the feature might be dead on arrival for a large part of askers.
    – l4mpi
    Commented Jul 27, 2023 at 14:40
  • 44
    The way this feature is currently implemented offers no avenue for feedback in the form of comments, votes, or even additional answers. SO and SE in general rely on these to maintain the effectiveness and relevance of their answers pool. Even from the most business-oriented point of view (disregarding the "community"), over time this would lead to more answers threads becoming outdated, with lower quality posts of all kinds and less engagement overall. Eventually it would make the AI magic irrelevant too, because it would have no relevant content to spin answers from.
    – Boaz
    Commented Jul 27, 2023 at 15:35
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    You're showing AI-synthesized solutions generated from existing answers telling people to use len() or upper() or something, but there are no links to documentation telling them how to use these functions. Sure, for built-ins like those, it's pretty self-explanatory, but start getting into anything more advanced and the AI's "answer" is pretty useless.
    – MattDMo
    Commented Jul 27, 2023 at 18:03
  • 69
    Come someone help me understand why the AI Ask Question assistant was tanked because it wasn't good enough, and yet now we have this thing... which seems like the same thing? Commented Jul 27, 2023 at 18:03
  • 52
    @GeorgeStocker because the CEO needed something to present Commented Jul 27, 2023 at 19:08
  • 38
    It'd be great if we could just leave all GPT technology off the site. It's just not accurate enough now. I'll try the feature once, look at the probabilistic garbage it'll spit out, and immediately disable it forever (hopefully that'll be possible--if not, I'll add it to my userscript). Yes, the current search stinks, but there are perfectly fine non-GPT search technologies we can use to fix it that run efficiently and don't hallucinate.
    – ggorlen
    Commented Jul 27, 2023 at 19:23
  • 13
    "..the user will then engage in a conversation to help them craft a high-quality question.." Sounds too good to be true. However, if you can pull that off, I'll be really impressed. It's the holy grail. Commented Jul 27, 2023 at 21:30
  • 22
    Are you aware that Generative AI is banned on Stack Overflow? All questions crafted with this ChatGPT thing must be closed as being AI authored, and repetitive use will result in bans for the users too.
    – Alejandro
    Commented Jul 28, 2023 at 12:22
  • 75
    Well, as I predicted, here we are. When is SE just going to admit that the prohibition on moderating generated content was never about mods getting it wrong, and all about normalizing AI on the network?
    – Rob Mod
    Commented Jul 28, 2023 at 15:49
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    I mean, if you're relying solely on users looking for solutions indicating whether or not said solutions are accurate/high quality... that feedback is going to be pretty untrustworthy.
    – Kevin B
    Commented Jul 28, 2023 at 18:52
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    @Bella_Blue With all due respect, that's difficult to believe. If you were, the first version would have included the very basic features that make this network possible. The fact that this product was announced to the world on every platform, without any regard to the community that makes it possible in the first place is mind boggling. It's like you'd demo a new car with no mention of its engine, and then "iterate" till it has one.
    – Boaz
    Commented Jul 29, 2023 at 19:07

22 Answers 22

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Allowing upvotes from the sources list where the user can't actually see any of the answers seems like very odd UX.

Are you expecting users to upvote all/a few of the sources if the generated text helps them? I'm not sure you should be able to say "this answer helped me" without being able to see that answer.

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    Is the upvote arrow an actual upvote on the post, or a feedback to the AI that it helped? As in: does the post's score, and thus the answerer's rep, change?
    – Adriaan
    Commented Jul 27, 2023 at 13:55
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    Yeah, given that there is no downvote option here, I am really hoping this is just a poorly implemented indication that the score of each result is a positive one. A screenshot that shows downvoted answers would really help to clarify this.
    – TylerH
    Commented Jul 27, 2023 at 14:04
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    FWIW, the initial demo they gave earlier in the week had no voting buttons at all. While this might not be ideal, the idea that the system would show people answers without any voting at all was a lot worse. Baby steps...
    – Machavity Mod
    Commented Jul 27, 2023 at 14:10
  • 79
    @Machavity I think you should be required to view an answer to decide if it's worth an up/downvote. I wouldn't mind a "was this generated content helpful" on the generated summary, but allowing voting from the sources list of titles feels fundamentally flawed.
    – DBS
    Commented Jul 27, 2023 at 14:23
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    Allowing voting from the sources list only produces indiscriminate voting.
    – Kevin B
    Commented Jul 27, 2023 at 14:30
  • 3
    Several answers chosen from different questions could all be written by the same person. If they are all upvoted then might the serial voting checking thing jump in and cancel all the votes.? Perhaps even leading to the voter getting a warning. (Just seen this on @andy (Mod)'s answer.)
    – AdrianHHH
    Commented Jul 27, 2023 at 16:36
  • I'd guess allowing voting without showing the body improves the accuracy (measured by upvotes after searching search) of an ML system that only takes the titles and tags into account.
    – dan1st
    Commented Jul 27, 2023 at 18:07
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    We are going to be deeply looking at how best to incorporate feedback loops on the sources. As I said in this comment we know how integral voting is to the network functionality as a whole. During Alpha testing upvotes won't increment the post's score or give rep. It will be used initially to gauge Alpha users interest in giving feedback.
    – Bella_Blue StaffMod
    Commented Jul 28, 2023 at 18:45
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    That being said, we know that reputation in itself is a complex system and have heard in early user testing that the fairness factor was important to participants, ie knowing how much of the source content was used in the AI summary. In short, these are the same questions we are asking while we iterate on this design and plan on working with the community to come up with viable options that are best suited for this feature and the contributors of the summary.
    – Bella_Blue StaffMod
    Commented Jul 28, 2023 at 18:45
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I am not a fan of showing the phrase "accepted answer". We already have a problem with accepted answers as people think that it's the correct or the best solution. I suggest just saying "answer" and not giving any prominence to accepted answers.

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    Not to mention all the cases where the accepted answer is outdated or just plain wrong.
    – MattDMo
    Commented Jul 27, 2023 at 18:00
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    Thank you for this feedback! This is not the final design and we plan on making some iterations and running tests before we make this search tool available to all users, so feedback like this is very helpful.
    – Bella_Blue StaffMod
    Commented Jul 27, 2023 at 20:46
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    Users would be less trigger-happy to accept answers if they didn't get reputation for that. Commented Jul 28, 2023 at 6:38
  • 1
    @LaurenzAlbe, Maybe, but a lot of users (probably a majority) come here, get the help the need, and vanish to never be seen again, or atleast not be seen again for a long time. They don't even know that an answer can and should be 'accepted'. That little bit of reputation (and even a badge if well-received for the first time) is the one tiny bit of incentive we have to get askers to give some kind of positive feedback. And it still doesn't work very well. I'm not sure there is a better way. There have been proposals (community accepted answers, etc...) but nothing's ever come of it.
    – ouflak
    Commented Aug 3, 2023 at 10:00
  • Just like an accepted answer grants more points to the user, the weight should be similar. This way, when an answer has way more points than the accepted answer it is preferred over the accepted answer. Maybe this weighted point value could be shown instead to avoid bias towards the green check-mark.
    – HackSlash
    Commented Aug 8, 2023 at 15:19
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At a high level, we're retrieving the most relevant results from the community using semantic search, retrieving the top answers from each of those results, and summarizing the knowledge we provide. This is to minimize and reduce the likelihood of hallucinated responses and avoid posting AI-generated answers to Stack Overflow. Sources are included to provide credit and attribution to the original post authors that were used in the summary.

Considering SE's trouble figuring out what questions are related to other questions, I'm very curious to see whether that problem is solved now. To be honest, I'm sceptical, especially considering the limited context a search bar provides.

Users can continue the search by asking follow-up questions, building on top of the original question. From here, they’ll see another AI-summarized solution, and as they build their knowledge and possible solutions, they can get more specific in their query, adding in their code or what they’ve tried and making highly personalized search results. These follow-up questions and iterative search experience will help enable users to better understand how the content applies to their context.

"AI-summarized"? LLMs have hallucinated plentily, in the past, when asked to summarize papers, books, all kinds of text.
How is this prevented?

Please tell me this isn't just ChatGPT's API, as that is certainly not capable of any reliable technical accuracy.

While the updated search will first try to find an instant answer, if an instant answer is not available, the user will then engage in a conversation to help them craft a high-quality question, helping to build new knowledge that’s discoverable and reusable in the future. The system will provide guidance and suggestions throughout the question-creation process and will also provide feedback on the quality of the question. Users can then choose to accept or reject the suggestions.

So you're letting AI generate the question...

What measures are taken to prevent the AI from changing the question's context? From silently fixing small mistakes in the user's problem?

How would a user know what is, and isn't a good suggestion?

Especially for new programmers, how to format a question is a big hurdle. Why wouldn't a new user just accept any and all suggestions the AI gives, if they lack the understanding required to see what suggestions aren't good?

TL;DR: Seeing is believing. I'm sceptical that it's even possible to make GenAI behave this well.

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    AI summarization - what could possibly go wrong? Maybe something like this: github.com/mdn/yari/issues/9208
    – Dalija Prasnikar Mod
    Commented Jul 27, 2023 at 13:37
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    I find the question suggestion part the most concerning given how the last experiment went. Commented Jul 27, 2023 at 13:38
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    This. My first thought when I read about incorporating AI into search on SO was: will it be as "helpful" as those completely unrelated "related questions". Like, will this be any better than the "related products" Safeway offered me when I added Pad Thai to my order...Maxi Pads. I mean, a pad is a pad, right? Commented Jul 27, 2023 at 17:57
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    You say “seeing is believing,” and I have to agree. The questions you’re asking are good ones, and I acknowledge the skepticism. At the same time, only results from testing will be able to adequately speak to your concerns. So let’s revisit this once Alpha users have some time to try it out.
    – Bella_Blue StaffMod
    Commented Jul 28, 2023 at 18:40
  • 7
    I appreciate your response, @Bella_Blue. I hope the alpha provides some good insight.
    – Cerbrus
    Commented Jul 28, 2023 at 19:31
  • @Bella_Blue Is it the same as the formatting assistance; just a wrapper around ChatGPT? Or, using ChatGPT to generate the text? Is that how it works? Commented Jul 30, 2023 at 0:42
  • I was on board with "SE's trouble figuring out related posts" until I realized you weren't talking about the mods. But give AI some credit, if human mods are terrible at figuring out if a post is a duplicate or not, how can you expect an LLM to do any better?
    – Tim
    Commented Jul 31, 2023 at 15:37
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    @Tim did you even read that link? They tried to fix that with AI and it wasn't any better.
    – Cerbrus
    Commented Jul 31, 2023 at 15:39
  • @Cerbrus It is better, for the old posts where it's actually implemented (currently live). The problem is they aren't implementing it on new or recent posts at all.
    – Kevin B
    Commented Jul 31, 2023 at 15:41
  • @Cerbrus erhm.. that is the source. "Update Mar 21: TL;DR: Today, we graduated the experiment for Stack Overflow question pages with zero answers, specifically the variant where three related questions are shown by default, with a link to view more."
    – Kevin B
    Commented Jul 31, 2023 at 15:50
  • I think I'm confusing experiments, I just noticed that one is live...
    – Cerbrus
    Commented Jul 31, 2023 at 15:50
  • ah, right, it was a 2 parter. but both parts were graduated, :p
    – Kevin B
    Commented Jul 31, 2023 at 15:50
  • The cut-off for using the ML generated related questions results is some time in februrary, and affects both answered and unasnwered posts (the location of related posts obviously varies between the two) but there's a stark difference in the suggested questions between posts before februrary and after. meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/424716/…
    – Kevin B
    Commented Jul 31, 2023 at 15:53
91

I'm not sure if there's anyone in SO upper management with the education experience and Python expertise to realize that even with softball demo questions...

This is a poor result! It's also a clear illustration of fundamental issues with the approach.

The results from analogous site search aren't great, either, to be fair. But near the top I do get Why doesn't calling a string method (such as .replace or .strip) modify (mutate) the string?, which is really important to see with a query like this. People who ask such a question are more likely confused by the fact that they tried some string method and it didn't operate in-place. ChatGPT's understanding of the word "modify" is in large part driven by ordinary English usage, in which it's indeed pretty similar to "manipulate"; but for programmers, those subtle differences are incredibly important.

At any rate, a grab-bag of unrelated string manipulations is really not that useful. A core weakness of ChatGPT-type engines is that they take a "the user is always right" attitude that is often just not good UI. A question like the one in this search query would get closed as being unclear or needing more focus, because that's how it is; and someone who writes something like this really needs to think about the problem first before trying to do research. The only good reason to generalize a category as disparate as "string modifications" is because the how-to question really masks a debugging question.

Another problem here is that presenting a list like this makes it seem like it's intended to be exhaustive. That's obviously nonsense; there are countless ways to manipulate strings in Python. This doesn't even describe all the reasonable string interpolation (what it calls "formatting", which I guess is close enough but not really right) techniques available!

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    +100. IMHO, this single response means the AI is horrible about this sort of thing. That they use it to "show off" says everything about the quality of responses this system will give. I scrolled down to check if someone'd written this yet, and would have myself if nobody else hadn't.
    – Gloweye
    Commented Jul 30, 2023 at 6:40
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    @karl Can you please add a clear explanation understandable to someone who has never used Python on precisely why this is a poor result? This is a really important point, and a huge problem with LLM-based tools: the answers "looks legit" to the non-subject-expert managers who sign off on them, who are often so wowed by the perfect grammar and confident tone that they don't believe the subject-matter-experts who try to explain that the generated content lacks substance (which is what I'm sure happened here). Commented Jul 31, 2023 at 10:34
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    What's poor about it is that it doesn't give results like the one I suggested should be included. The results are based on the premise that the framing of the question makes sense, and my point is that the framing probably does not make sense, and instead is motivated by an XY problem. Commented Jul 31, 2023 at 10:44
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    @user56reinstatemonica8: I think the point is that these functions produce a modified copy of a string. Given a reference to a string in Python, my understanding is that you can't change the contents that other readers will see. You need to assign a new string to a variable that other readers will access through, because a lot of Python objects are immutable. (This might be party wrong; I've read some about Python but I don't program in it.) Commented Jul 31, 2023 at 18:38
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    @PeterCordes You have the gist of it. (The C implementation "cheats" for optimization reasons, but not in ways that should be observable from Python.) Commented Aug 1, 2023 at 0:22
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    The phrase "utilize the format() method" is doing a lot of work there, too. It's not a very intuitive method to use without any instruction. Commented Aug 2, 2023 at 20:40
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    The way I would put it is, the AI should be asking for clarification, but it's not. Like, 'What do you mean by "modify"? If you mean "manipulate", there are various ways, and I can show you, but if you mean "mutate" (in-place), that's not quite possible, and I can explain why if you want.'
    – wjandrea
    Commented Aug 5, 2023 at 0:51
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My initial impression is very negative. I might be biased as I haven't really seen issues with the existing search functionality. [edit: and taking for granted that there are issues, this doesn't seem to actually fix the underlying issues.]

Quora added some AI-generated answer at the top of its questions and I don't like it. If I wanted AI answers I'd go to one of the AI websites, which already scrape Stack Overflow.

The unique thing that Stack Overflow offers to me is a combination of high-quality expert answers to questions, an efficient rating system to help me figure out which answers are high-quality, and comments / multiple answers to help provide context, clarifications, and corrections to answers. I don't trust the AI answers themselves and there isn't any rating system or comments here to figure out if the AI-generated answer is trustworthy at all. I'd never use it; it only adds fluff to skip that, in these demos, take up half the page.

It also feels like these AI answers cannibalize the actual answers, discouraging people from reading, voting, and commenting on the source material.

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    Your last sentence is key. If you get the info you need from a generated summary, why bother reading entire answers (which may contain very important caveats or alternative methods) or up/down voting the questions and the answers. For most non-newbie questions, a summary is not sufficient.
    – MattDMo
    Commented Jul 27, 2023 at 18:18
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    "I haven't really seen issues with the existing search functionality." Oh but the search engine is bad, and we've been complaining about it for a very, very, long time.
    – E_net4
    Commented Jul 27, 2023 at 18:46
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    I agree 100%, especially the last part. The fact is, people think that summarizing work in a specific way, but it depends highly on context. You can't expect that some automated tool would be, always, able to give accurate summarization? And while one could argue "it's good enough", I don't believe cutting corners like this, especially on delicate and complex things, such as language writing/parsing, should be left to an automated tool. Most people won't check them always, or will put them on a pedestal, and act surprised when everything go wrong. Commented Jul 27, 2023 at 21:53
  • I find the search poor, especially looking for duplicates.
    – tgdavies
    Commented Jul 27, 2023 at 21:57
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    My impression of the goal of this project is to expressly avoid the "AI-generated answer" bit. In a perfect world, the output will only summarize existing, high-quality answers by experts, and be directly attributable & traceable back to their source answer(s). Only time will tell whether that pans out in practice, but I think the whole point addresses your main concern head on, and it makes me really, really hopeful for this project. AI-generated answers are a suuuuuper rudimentary site integration; personally, I think it's projects like this one where stuff gets way, way more interesting.
    – zcoop98
    Commented Jul 27, 2023 at 22:17
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    @zcoop98 "the output will only summarize existing, high-quality answers by experts" Hopefully, only attempting to produce a relevant summary will minimise the hallucination problems that have plagued similar attempts, eg the SO formatting assistant, and the MDN GPT tools linked in meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/425766/… The MDN tools rely on the very high quality MDN knowledge base, but were still prone to produce nonsense, depending on the nature of the OP's query.
    – PM 2Ring
    Commented Jul 28, 2023 at 6:42
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    From github.com/mdn/yari/issues/9230#issuecomment-1636785321 In other words, ChatGPT is an XY problem amplifier. You want to do something with an API that wasn't made to do the something, you ask the tool in MDN how to do that, it will hallucinate some gibberish for you that makes it sound like it's possible, and now you're stuck even further in your XY problem.
    – PM 2Ring
    Commented Jul 28, 2023 at 6:43
  • @PM2Ring The devil is most certainly in the details for this one.
    – zcoop98
    Commented Jul 28, 2023 at 15:30
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    Re "I haven't really seen issues with the existing search functionality.": Well, it is very very literal. It will not accept any kind of spelling mistake (say, occured) or minor variation (this will result in false negatives). Commented Jul 29, 2023 at 13:37
52

I have several questions. If it'd be helpful, I can break these into individual answers.

  • In the sources section, there are only upvote buttons. Is the intention to launch this with both upvote and downvote capabilities in this section?
  • How will serial voting be accounted for? If one user happens to have multiple answers in the Sources and their answers are considered helpful it's likely their answers will get upvoted at this point. How will the system handle a user upvoting these answers from the same user and not appear like they are serial upvoting?
  • "At a high level, we're retrieving the most relevant results from the community using semantic search, retrieving the top answers from each of those results, and summarizing the knowledge we provide. " - Does this mean if those source answers are downvoted because they turn out to not be helpful and the question is re-asked a different answer will be created or is the underlying model not updated that frequently?
  • How frequently is the underlying model updated? New languages and frameworks come out all the time. Will users encounter a "Sorry I'm only trained through [date]" messages?
  • Will the model refuse to answer a question if it can't generate a "good enough" response? Without knowing the underlying system, CGPT is very bad at saying "I don't know". Does this suffer a similar problem?
  • If a user receives a good answer from the generative system they are less likely to post the question. For better or worse, this network does have a reputation toward new users, and building a tool that gets those users answers without interacting with the community is a win from their perspective. On the other hand, the community needs questions to thrive. Without questions there are fewer answers. Without new answers, their are fewer questions and now less to train an updated model on. How does this conflict get resolved?
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    "Without questions there are fewer answers." If there is an answer that means the question has already been asked. No need to ask it again. Preventing useless duplicates is a plus.
    – Dalija Prasnikar Mod
    Commented Jul 27, 2023 at 14:43
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    Useless duplicates - agreed. My concern is that with the "continue discussion" part of this, we may be losing out on questions that aren't the 1000th duplicate.
    – Andy Mod
    Commented Jul 27, 2023 at 15:09
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    Whether a user gets an answer right away or after "continued discussion", it means that somewhere, someone posted a question as same as (or very similar to) what the user is asking. So, I don't share that concern. But the rest of your points are valid +1.
    – M--
    Commented Jul 27, 2023 at 15:37
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    Wow these are a lot of questions, and truthfully they are ones we’ve been asking ourselves throughout our design process. It is good to know we are of the same mind with these concerns. Let me break down my response in a few comments:
    – Bella_Blue StaffMod
    Commented Jul 27, 2023 at 20:51
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    For your concerns about voting, what I can say is we plan on leaning heavily on the community to help design with solutions. It is important to us that contributions are given credit fairly and in the most effective way so that we can provide the most value with this feature. Abuse is also at the forefront of our mind, and as always, we’d like to prevent it to whatever extent possible.
    – Bella_Blue StaffMod
    Commented Jul 27, 2023 at 20:52
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    For your question about the system answering when no good answer exists on Stack Overflow -- We are only pulling information from Stack Overflow, so if there is no relevant content on Stack Overflow itself, the feature will indicate that there no results are available.
    – Bella_Blue StaffMod
    Commented Jul 27, 2023 at 20:52
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    For your last bullet point - please see my previous comment but in short this is a facet of user participation we will keep a close eye on. But we believe that we will be able to alleviate some of that risk by by funneling users towards drafting a proper question if we are not able to provide relevant results.
    – Bella_Blue StaffMod
    Commented Jul 27, 2023 at 20:52
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In the demos, softball examples are used where there is a lot of space to pull from, content-wise. This is because AI does just fine if it can guess from a wide range of solutions which are all accurate.

However, this will break down in nuanced situations. Areas where there is only one correct answer from a set of incorrect ones will unfortunately be flat out wrong, and in usual AI fashion that inaccuracy will be presented as fact.

What is worse is that the summary is essentially a citation of user content, without proper attribution. Showing a hidden link of referenced answers does not count, and this is a violation of not only the user agreement but also of the current content license agreement between Stack Overflow and the content creators.

  • What will be done to prevent the auto generated content from plagiarizing existing work?

  • What remedy is there for inaccurate solutions being presented as factually correct?

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    regarding plagiarizing - I have posted a question on Law SE that tries to explore that a bit. Generally, we have licensed SE to "adapt/transform" our answers - so the only question remaining is whether these summaries are even copyrightable.
    – ccprog
    Commented Jul 27, 2023 at 23:19
  • @ccprog - Yes, but "with proper attribution" is always included in any use of content. This current example does not use proper attribution and therein lies the violation of license.
    – Travis J
    Commented Jul 28, 2023 at 0:13
  • 1
    I would say the list of search results can serve as attribution: it is labeled as "Sources" and contains both links to the content and the author. I was more concerned the "share alike" part was missing.
    – ccprog
    Commented Jul 28, 2023 at 0:44
  • 2
    @ccprog - It is not proper attribution. That would be like publishing a paper where none of the sources in the reference were actually cited during the article. You can't just jumble a list of links after and call it a day, that isn't how attribution works. There needs to be direct citation for works used; that is the license. Without direct citation, it is plagiarism unless the entirety of the work is remixed solely from one source and the source is referenced (which isn't the case here).
    – Travis J
    Commented Jul 28, 2023 at 17:42
  • Please explain what are softball examples, I can't find any explanation. Commented Jul 29, 2023 at 21:55
  • 4
    Examples are already breaking down. Python has immutable strings.
    – Gloweye
    Commented Jul 30, 2023 at 6:42
  • 3
    @A.I. - Sure, examples where it is easy for the statistical model to go find a large content of relevant work and then start to draw out something that sounds like it was actually an answer. As opposed to giving it something more difficult, which involved actual problem solving (without giving it the answers in leading prompts). String manipulation is pretty straightforward... perhaps if we asked about the implications of using different types of MSSQL alternatives for SQL Providers in .NET for example. Softball is a reference to a slow pitch, to something easy and free of surprises.
    – Travis J
    Commented Jul 30, 2023 at 8:36
23

Addressing search is an important topic, for sure. I'm glad it's getting attention. And this is one of the more useful applications of "AI".

Some concerns, though:

  1. Based on the screenshots, it's likely that this will do a lot more than bringing people to the relevant questions/answers. What will be the impact on key metrics, such as page views and voting? If people can do a search and see a generated answer based on the relevant answers, it seems like people won't click through and be able to see other, less highly voted answers. It also reduces page views and overall votes on those answers. It seems like these metrics are very important to the company, so it seems odd to roll out changes that, at least on the surface, look like they will negatively impact those numbers.

  2. In the comments, it's mentioned that there are no immediate plans for rolling out network-wide. There are two aspects of this. One is cross-site search. Even keeping the scope to "people who are writing code", there are plenty of sites where answers could live - Stack Overflow is the biggest, but there are some code related questions on Cross Validated, Mathematics, WordPress Development, Software Engineering, Database Administrators, Server Fault, DevOps, Code Review, Drupal Answers, SQA & Testing, Signal Processing, Data Science, emacs, Vi and Vim, and maybe more. It would be good to have some more concrete plans for (1) rolling this out to individual sites in the network and (2) cross-site search for closely related sites.

  3. I agree with the other comments that up voting (or voting at all) should not be allowed without visiting the page and seeing the full post used in the generation. If this isn't an up vote, consider changing the icons to be something different. Perhaps more like the comment up vote icon? Although, once again, I don't know how useful it is to say that a specific post was useful unless you review that specific post.

  4. Summarizing a single question and its answer(s) would be more useful and more usable than trying to summarize a large number of questions and all associated answers. I have concerns around hallucinations with generative AI. If you generate an answer, but then cite 8 answers spread across even 4 or 5 questions, that's a lot of reading to fact-check. However, if you can give me 3 or 4 summaries and point to 3 or 4 question/answer sets, that could be much more reasonable. Please consider that users should be encouraged to fact-check anything created by generative algorithms with the backing human-produced content for relevance and accuracy.

4
  • 1
    1. Please see this response where I go into more detail but yes this is something we plan on keeping a close eye on.
    – Bella_Blue StaffMod
    Commented Jul 28, 2023 at 18:41
  • 2
    2. Rolling this feature out network-wide is something we are considering and have been thinking about logistically. We want to ensure the feature is a value add whichever site it is implemented on and we are happy to see that you see the usefulness of this feature.
    – Bella_Blue StaffMod
    Commented Jul 28, 2023 at 18:41
  • 1
    3. Voting is an integral part of the Stack Overflow experience as well as something that is essential to how we rank the usefulness of questions. It is very much in the forefront of our minds while designing this feature and we plan to lean heavily on the community for input on how to best leverage it.
    – Bella_Blue StaffMod
    Commented Jul 28, 2023 at 18:41
  • 1
    4. Thank you for this feedback this is something that we will take into consideration as we iterate. It is important to us that this feature eases the burden of those who are seeking answers not add to the workload.
    – Bella_Blue StaffMod
    Commented Jul 28, 2023 at 18:42
22

Two obvious implications:

  • The search feature with instant answering will divert traffic away from the content pieces as defined by the human contributions (questions, answers) and will have implications on the motivations of those content providers. It's not so much different from ChatGPT. But there is a difference between writing something that others read or writing something that an algorithm uses to present something that others read. It kind of destroys the sense of direct interaction and could have big effects on the motivation of content providers. There is big danger for you ahead of killing your own content base. Keep this effect in mind!

  • You talk about helping users crafting high-quality questions. Sorry, but you may be too naive there. If anything, the past has shown how incredibly difficult that is. There is a very, very high risk that you'll fail there, the combination of a confused user and some smug AI could prove deadly. Be very careful there. (I don't say that in small doses with human supervision AI couldn't be helpful with question asking, just that the envisioned approach "should I craft a high-quality question for you sir" may not be feasible). Maybe better start with identifying existing duplicates instead or something similar and much simpler tasks.

The more unclear implication is that I wonder how much garbage (low-quality content) will be produced there (both in AI-powered search and in question asking). Should GenAI be renamed into GarbageAI?


As an addition, here is my self-experiment trying to implement manually the search you seem to envision and learning from it.

Step 1: I need a test question.

I looked at the top scored Python questions (because I have expertise there). I settled for How do I select rows from a DataFrame based on column values? which is not too difficult to answer and with nearly 6 million visits also fairly common. A well implemented search should be able to instantly answer that. I slightly reformulate the question as: "How can I select all rows in a DataFrame where the column values follow a condition in Python?" to make it realistic.

Step 2: Search for the question with Stack Overflow search

Oh. That only gives three results and not the original question I was looking for.

Step 3: Search for the question with Google and restrict results to Stack Overflow

That worked better. The second result is the one I'm looking for.

Step 4: Take the highest voted answers from the first four distinct questions in the search result and merge the text. If some of them are closed, take instead the duplicate target.

I took this, this, this and this answer. I simply selected the text on the displayed webpage in the browser.

Step 5: Ask ChatGPT to summarize the content of these four answers. My (naive?) prompt was "Please summarize the following text:"

The summary consists of 10 bullet points and 269 words.

The given text provides explanations and examples of using pandas DataFrame indexing and selection methods. Here's a summary of the main points:

  1. To select rows based on the condition that any value in the row is greater than a specified value (value = 123), you can use df[df.gt(value).any(axis=1)].

  2. To select rows based on the condition that any value in a specific column is greater than a specified value (value = 123), you can use df.loc[:, df.gt(value).any(axis=0)].

  3. To select rows whose column value equals a scalar (some_value), use df.loc[df['column_name'] == some_value].

  4. To select rows whose column value is in an iterable (some_values), use df.loc[df['column_name'].isin(some_values)].

  5. Combine multiple conditions using the & operator and remember to use parentheses to ensure proper operator precedence. For example, df.loc[(df['column_name'] >= A) & (df['column_name'] <= B)].

  6. To select rows whose column value does not equal a specific value (some_value), use df.loc[df['column_name'] != some_value].

  7. To select rows whose column value is not in an iterable (some_values), use df.loc[~df['column_name'].isin(some_values)].

  8. The provided example creates a pandas DataFrame and demonstrates the usage of the previously explained methods for selecting rows based on specific conditions.

  9. The example also shows how to use df.eq to check if any value in the DataFrame is equal to 1 and then use df.any(axis=1) to return True for rows where any of the column values have 1.

  10. If you have a list of columns (myColumns), you can use df.loc[df[myColumns].all(1)] to select rows where all the specified columns have non-zero values.

Remember that pandas DataFrame indexing and selection methods provide powerful tools for data manipulation and filtering.

That's a bit too long for a quick and instant answer. I was specifically looking for df.loc[df['column_name'] == X] or similar. Also the last paragraph is hallucinated (and not very informative). None of the input states that.

Step 6: Try to get a more condensed output

The follow-up prompt "Please give a more condensed output" results in 6 bullet points where 4 original bullet points are merged into one. Followed up by "Please report only the most important information in the text" still results in 5 bullet points:

The most important information in the text is about the different methods for selecting rows in a pandas DataFrame based on specific conditions:

  1. Use df[df.gt(value).any(axis=1)] to select rows with any value greater than a specified value.

  2. For selecting rows based on specific column values:

  • Use df.loc[df['column_name'] == some_value] for equal to scalar condition.
  • Use df.loc[df['column_name'].isin(some_values)] for values in an iterable.
  • Use df.loc[df['column_name'] != some_value] for not equal to scalar >condition.
  • Use df.loc[~df['column_name'].isin(some_values)] for values not in an >iterable.
  1. Combine multiple conditions using & with parentheses: df.loc[(df['column_name'] >= A) & (df['column_name'] <= B)].

  2. To select rows where any value in the DataFrame is equal to 1, use df[df.eq(1).any(axis=1)].

  3. For selecting rows where all specified columns have non-zero values, use df.loc[df[myColumns].all(1)].

It's still too much, although I would in principle say that bullet point two is very helpful.

Step 7: Control: Ask ChatGPT directly

That gives

To select all rows in a DataFrame where the column values follow a specific condition in Python, you can use boolean indexing or the .loc[] method. Here's how you can do it:

Suppose you have a DataFrame named df, and you want to select rows where a specific column, say column_name, satisfies a condition, such as being greater than a certain value threshold.

  1. Using Boolean Indexing:
# Assuming 'df' is your DataFrame and 'column_name' is the column you want to filter >on.
# 'threshold' is the value used for filtering.

# Boolean indexing to filter rows based on the condition
filtered_df = df[df['column_name'] > threshold]
  1. Using .loc[]:
# Assuming 'df' is your DataFrame and 'column_name' is the column you want to filter >on.
# 'threshold' is the value used for filtering.

# Use .loc[] method to select rows based on the condition
filtered_df = df.loc[df['column_name'] > threshold]

Both methods will return a new DataFrame called filtered_df, containing only the >rows where the values in the specified column meet the given condition. The original >DataFrame df remains unchanged.

You can replace 'column_name' with the name of the column you want to use for the >condition, and threshold with the specific value you want to use as the condition.

My conclusions (from N=1 with some adhoc prompts)

  • The summaries are very verbose. It's difficult to reduce the output to say only the most important information. With the right prompt that may be possible.
  • The lack of links in AI generated output (to documentation for example) is a drawback compared to human-created content.
  • The direct ChatGPT output isn't so much worse. Does it really give a benefit of using SO answers and summarizing them over using ChatGPT directly?
  • There may be some garbage in it, but for such popular questions actually not that much. For more specialized question it could be much worse however.
  • But even here my impression is that I would rather like to read the human-written answers because they are higher quality and give better context. Better search is helpful. An AI written summary of human-written content? Doubtful.

P.S.: With the prompt "Limit the response to 50 words or less, I get 56 words (just the most important pieces).

Methods for selecting rows in a pandas DataFrame:

  1. df[df.gt(value).any(axis=1)] for values greater than a specified value.
  2. df.loc[df['column_name'] == some_value] for equal values.
  3. df.loc[df['column_name'].isin(some_values)] for values in an iterable.
  4. df.loc[df['column_name'] != some_value] for values not equal to a scalar.
  5. df[df.eq(1).any(axis=1)] for values equal to 1 in the DataFrame.
  6. df.loc[df[myColumns].all(1)] for rows with non-zero values in specified columns.

And with "limit the response to 20 words or less" I get

Methods for selecting rows in pandas DataFrame: > df[df.gt(value).any(axis=1)], df.loc[df['column_name'] == some_value], and more.

which might be something valuable for people interested in a quick piece of information.


P.S. Could comments be meaningfully included in a summary, especially if they partly contradict the content was a question by camille in a comment. Here is my self-trial with Should I use the datetime or timestamp data type in MySQL? The top most answer by blivet has highly scored comments by MattBianco and OZ_. If I ask ChatGPT to summarize the answer or to summarize the answer including both comments, the results are different and if answer text and comment text is both used, content from the content is used although the quality is difficult to access. It depends on the shortening and some context is presumably lost.

Just the summary of the answer

Timestamps in MySQL are used to track record changes and can be updated whenever the record changes. For storing a specific value, use a datetime field. If choosing between a UNIX timestamp or MySQL datetime field, prefer the native DATETIME format for easy calculations within MySQL and converting to a UNIX timestamp when querying with PHP.

Summary of answer and comments

Timestamps in MySQL are commonly used to track record changes but should be used carefully. For specific values, it's better to opt for a datetime field. Choose the native DATETIME format over UNIX timestamps, as it allows calculations within MySQL and simplifies format conversion when queried with PHP. DATETIME represents a date and time in a calendar, while TIMESTAMP represents a well-defined point in time, making it crucial for applications handling time zones. One downside of TIMESTAMP is its limited valid range, and queries with native datetime won't be cached, while those with timestamps will be.

While in principle taking highly voted comments into account is not a problem, the quality of the outcome may vary.

4
  • 2
    Couldn't you shape the (ChatGPT) response by including something like "Limit the response to 50 words or less."? Commented Jul 29, 2023 at 13:51
  • @PeterMortensen Yes, that seems to work. It strongly reduces the unnecessary parts. Commented Jul 31, 2023 at 9:31
  • 1
    Thank you for your feedback. I just wanted to note that some of the concerns about changes in user participation were addressed here.
    – Sasha StaffMod
    Commented Aug 2, 2023 at 20:29
  • @Sasha Thank you for that comment. I'm quite skeptical. The feature will divert traffic away from the human-written content pages. How much decrease of traffic and what effect it will have, remains to be seen, but I do not under any circumstances expect an increase. Commented Aug 3, 2023 at 12:46
21

While I am extremely happy to see the search bar getting improvements, there are a few things that the current search bar does that can't be done anywhere else. Particularly for moderators being able to search deleted content can only be done through the site search using the deleted: operator. Indeed, there are many useful "reports" that can be generated using the existing site search. The ability to search for unanswered questions in your favourite tag or low-scoring open questions that might require an edit or closure is an extremely valuable feature that relies on the existing search functionality.

So my questions is: will this AI search replace the existing functionality entirely? If so, will there be a way to pull this information somewhere else?

8
  • 7
    From the question: "we can leverage AI to provide a results summary that draws from multiple high-quality answers on Stack Overflow, in addition to providing the traditional search results list of questions and answers." (emphasis mine)
    – TylerH
    Commented Jul 27, 2023 at 14:02
  • Hmm. I wonder what the Gen AI will do with a prompt like deleted:1 [python] (Thanks @TylerH I missed that in my read through)
    – Henry Ecker Mod
    Commented Jul 27, 2023 at 14:04
  • 1
    I am guessing the two search methods will be totally separate, like different tabs of a browser. If you paste a traditional search query into the Gen AI one... it'll probably do its best to return results or say "I need more information (write more characters in your query)" or something.
    – TylerH
    Commented Jul 27, 2023 at 14:04
  • 3
    The video makes it look like you just type into search and the AI content appears above your normal list of questions and answers.
    – Henry Ecker Mod
    Commented Jul 27, 2023 at 14:06
  • well, kinda. the normal list of questions and answers has less info in this new style, losing out on the opening summary for each answer, which tags were on the question, when it was last modified and by who, etc. Hopefully this "feature" comes with an off switch.
    – Kevin B
    Commented Jul 27, 2023 at 15:10
  • I would assume it only does AI if there is freeform text, not if you just filled the box with search operators. Or that's what I hope…
    – Laurel
    Commented Jul 27, 2023 at 17:54
  • @Laurel it's also only showing answers, not questions. so either there's gonna be a way to sidestep this... "tool", or... idunno.
    – Kevin B
    Commented Jul 27, 2023 at 18:50
  • 3
    We will continue to support advanced search functionality, including the use of operators. This will be achieved by using a hybrid model utilizing both lexical and semantic search. You can read more about this in the new blog post: stackoverflow.blog/2023/07/31/…
    – Sasha StaffMod
    Commented Jul 31, 2023 at 21:14
17

The first thing you've got to do is to make the site search actually return relevant results. Once you've got that, there's really no need for the summary.

The correct solution is:

  1. Fix the site search to actually find the answers people need.
  2. Done.

Your plan seems to be:

  1. Fix the site search to find the answers people need.
  2. Hide those answers behind a chatbot generated smoke screen (summary.)
  3. If the summary isn't sufficient, prompt the user to ask a new question.
  4. ???
  5. Profit.

Are you folks going into the obfuscated underpants gnomes business?


Oh, crap. You are trying to sneak the failed "question formatter" in through the back door again.

It failed. It is dead. End of the story. Give it up.

Given those results, I don't see the summary being all that useful, either.

15

I'll see this positively, as a way to improve the search functionality. Thank you for finally moving on that front. I agree that preventing (most) duplicate questions from being asked would actually be good. It centralises knowledge and possibly reduces the FGITW and rep-farming issues on well-known topics.

However, given the current focus on participation rates, e.g. in the meta.SE post about ChatGPT data, is getting fewer questions desirable from the company's point of view? I agree that having fewer duplicates and low-quality questions would help the site closer to its self-stated goal of being a knowledge database, but I fail to see how less traffic is a good thing for the company. Or are there any plans on inserting ads on the search page to become a sort of Google-for-programming-questions?

Additionally, what will be the success criteria for this feature? It reads as if fewer posted questions and fewer visited answer pages, i.e. staying within the AI-generated response mode, is actually considered a success.

3
  • 5
    Changes in participation are something that we will be watching closely as this feature is launched. Our goal is to help developers find solutions to their answers quicker, using the most effective tools we have. The updated search experience powered by AI should result in fewer duplicate posts on Stack Overflow, and provide users with supportive and effective guidance through question-asking. That being said, we are always working on ways to boost participation on the network and we believe this feature could benefit that cause as well.
    – Bella_Blue StaffMod
    Commented Jul 27, 2023 at 20:47
  • 1
    "I agree that preventing (most) duplicate questions from being asked would actually be good." But does it? Probably only if this is part of the question asking process, not part of the search process (unless a search is part of the asking process). Commented Jul 27, 2023 at 21:34
  • 4
    @Bella_Blue in what way would this feature "boost participation"? As I said, it seems to me that remaining within the AI-search environment is the key success parameter here. That means less people asking questions. How will you/the company get people to participate beyond the AI-assisted search functionality and e.g. provide answers, participate in moderation etc.?
    – Adriaan
    Commented Jul 28, 2023 at 5:28
14

No thanks

The suggested continuation suggests "Thanks, this worked for me", which might encourage people to comment the same. "Thanks" and similar stuff is considered noise on Stack Overflow.

IMO we should have the smallest possible gap between what's expected when working with this conversational AI thing and the actual site, which is not conversational, just questions and answers. Ideally, these premade actions should be close to what we expect on the site, e.g. "Accept answer", "This doesn't work -> box specifying how it doesn't work", etc.

If we create a huge disconnect between what's expected when asking the conversational AI and what's expected when actually asking on the site, the site is bound to get even more confusing and unwelcoming to new users asking their first questions.

13

One of the challenges I see with this solution is that low quality input will obviously result in low quality output. Keeping the user's search query aside one of the inputs the generative AI will supposedly take is the existing answers. We all know that the sites search feature is bad. The question touches on this topic a bit but doesn't really give any details:

The traditional search results will also have improvements to the relevance of the search results listed.

How will these search results be improved? Is that generative AI or a completely separate solution? I would suggest search improvements be launched separately from this feature.

2
  • 5
    Don't necessarily agree it is bad. It is really good! ... at doing filtered searches to get for example potentially answerable questions, or find things you yourself participated in. It's nice you can discriminate to your heart's content with quite complex filtering criteria. It is an absolute wreck at finding answers to questions though.
    – Gimby
    Commented Jul 27, 2023 at 12:58
  • 3
    GenAI is not used to compile the list of search results. The current search experience is lexical/keyword-based powered by Elasticsearch. In the Alpha test, we're using semantic search which supports natural language to find more relevant content. You can read more about this in the new blog post: stackoverflow.blog/2023/07/31/…
    – Sasha StaffMod
    Commented Jul 31, 2023 at 20:34
11

This is just annoying. If I search for that myself (trivial example I'll get a proper result for anyway), I'll currently get this (And this, btw. Don't ever present me that, please) (btw, "python string length" is a much more efficient search query to write):

Image of an answer

This is clear, and I can skip down to line two of the code block. So easy to read. So simple. So little brain power I need to waste on it. At the same time, your genAI search result, is a pain to get past. Instead of instantly providing me extremely simple example code, which is what I'm good at parsing, I get an entire 3 bullet points of annoyingly intricate and overly detailed steps, so much to the point of being confusing. It's a lot of text to read, for no apparent gain. Please provide better examples to showcase your shiny new tool. Not just that, but even before I get to the bullet points, I am greeted with a rewrite of my question as a statement, as if that's of any need to me. Please don't tell me you've done exactly the same as you did with The Abomination? I may not have any faith left in this platform and its future, but heck, it contains a lot of useful content, and I was planning to continue reading the stuff on here without barriers like this in my way.

As an aside, the other changes unrelated to this, that you're experimenting with, is removing the sidebar links to the meta sites (smells of 2019), and making the useless blog article links even more screaming. These changes are also just annoying, and hurting the site and the community.

3
  • 1
    Regarding your last paragraph: There already is no link in the sidebar to the Meta site – unless you're talking about featured/hot meta posts in the community bulletin. As far as I can tell, the community bulletin currently doesn't appear on search results pages at all.
    – V2Blast
    Commented Jul 28, 2023 at 18:47
  • @V2Blast Actually, you're right. That's surprising. But then why add the blog articles to the sidebar, but not the featured meta posts and HMP? Or are the search results now inlined in the already viewed SO page, instead of navigating to the dedicated search page? In that case, why remove featured and HMP? Commented Jul 28, 2023 at 18:52
  • And to clear up some possible confusion: I usually use an off-site full-web search engine, though I still use the on-site search from time to time. But I haven't paid attention to the lack of the bulletin content on the search page, though I do that when viewing the screenshots, as it seems to me as a preview of the standard page (which normally has it). But even if I hadn't used the on-site search, if this AI is pushed onto me without me seeking it out, it's still a form of barrier, either as a distraction, or if it's pushed too heavily. Even worse, if it would replace existing functionality Commented Jul 28, 2023 at 18:57
11

I think most people agree that the SO search feature could use improvement. I'm not sure that's such a pressing problem in practice, however, because there's already an improved version: Google, with site:stackoverflow.com. Nevertheless, I'm all for an improved internal search, for some values of "improved".

We’ve heard feedback that for many developers on Stack Overflow, finding a solution to their problem can sometimes take a while. We understand that many developers have found Stack Overflow search not always to be effective, often unable to find existing posts to address their problems.

The main issue there is relevance of search results. This is an excellent problem to address. AI may have some useful application in this area, but I don't see a role here for generative AI.

We also know that the results found can sometimes be abstract, lengthy, or advanced for the reader, making it hard for them to connect the dots about how this knowledge applies to their specific problem.

If some of the search results don't speak directly to the query then this is also a matter of relevance. On the other hand, if the query does not describe what the querent actually wants to know, then that problem is on the user side. When there's an AI good enough to reliably determine what thing other than what Random User actually said is what they were really trying to ask, I'll probably be too busy trying to resist Skynet to care.

If, on the third hand, the querent does not have sufficient context or background knowledge to understand at least some of the most relevant answers, then I have no reason at all to believe that generative AI can help.

after a user searches or asks a question in the Stack Overflow search bar, we can leverage AI to provide a results summary that draws from multiple high-quality answers on Stack Overflow,

So far, the evidence suggests not. Or, at least, not in a useful way.

Before even starting with this, the relevance problem needs to be adequately addressed. Otherwise, any attempt at AI summarization is saddled with a garbage in / garbage out problem.

And even beyond that, I think the reasonable expectation for good relevance is still far short of picking up on the kind of technical nuance that often factors in to which answers really address the question posed.

in addition to providing the traditional search results list of questions and answers. The traditional search results will also have improvements to the relevance of the search results listed.

Again, start there. And once you've got that licked, have another think about where would be the most effective place to spend your investors' money.

At a high level, we're retrieving the most relevant results from the community using semantic search, retrieving the top answers from each of those results, and summarizing the knowledge we provide.

"We're" as in we are doing that now? Hardly. I can only interpret that claim as aspirational.

It would actually be pretty cool to see, but I'm not holding my breath. I don't think we presently have AI tools capable of doing an adequate job either of selecting the most relevant results or of summarizing them effectively, especially for questions and answers with the kind of technical nuance that is common here.

This is to minimize and reduce the likelihood of hallucinated responses

That seems to be largely and substantially speculative.

and avoid posting AI-generated answers to Stack Overflow.

Say what?

I mean, I'm glad to hear that management wants to avoid AI-generated answers being posted to Stack Overflow, which hasn't been altogether clear, but I'm not seeing how the search features described stand to help with that.

Sources are included to provide credit and attribution to the original post authors that were used in the summary.

Well there's something I guess we can all agree is good and appropriate.

Users can continue the search by asking follow-up questions, building on top of the original question. From here, they’ll see another AI-summarized solution, and as they build their knowledge and possible solutions, they can get more specific in their query, adding in their code or what they’ve tried and making highly personalized search results. These follow-up questions and iterative search experience will help enable users to better understand how the content applies to their context.

If a well-functioning research assistant of this kind could really be prepared for SO then that would be awesome. I would use it. Unfortunately, I don't see the "well-functioning" part of that happening in the foreseeable future. This is more a research problem than an engineering problem, and Stack Exchange, Inc. is not well positioned to tackle it.

Ultimately, this updated search experience should result in fewer duplicate posts on Stack Overflow, provide a supportive onboarding of users through guided question-asking, and overall better quality of questions being asked on Stack Overflow.

All good goals, but I'll believe it when I see it.

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I've been trying to use genAI to help me write questions at Chinese.SE. I realize this is a totally different topic, but I feel some pitfalls I've encountered are likely to be encountered here too.

  • It makes me sound like a total newbie, and if I posted such questions, I would likely get answers I find useless. If I tell it I'm an advanced student, it then edits that into the question, making me sound arrogant. This is unsurprising; the genAI doesn't know my level.

  • It doesn't understand Stack Exchange's culture. E.g. I don't know how to stop genAIs adding "thanks", e.g.

    Thank you for your insights!

    If I say not to say "thank you" it says:

    Any insights or examples would be greatly appreciated.

    It can be unnecessarily verbose. And it sometimes turns my question into ~5 consecutive questions, which if I posted, would be closed as "Needs more focus". It does this even if I explicitly say not to.

  • It makes up stuff that could waste people's time. E.g.:

    I have tried searching online and asking my Chinese friends, but I have received conflicting answers.

    No I haven't! Will people ask me about this in the comments?

  • It repeats things from my prompt in the question. Such as:

    Add dictionary references if they are helpful:

Oh, and images are just out of the question.

Currently, the best I'm getting out of genAI is a useful sentence or two; the rest needs rewriting. It can save me time by giving me the romanization and dictionary links (if I use a carefully curated prompt). Occasionally it can surmise where I'm stuck and why the question is interesting.

Hopefully you can do better than me. (Oh, and it would be good if the question could sound like it was written by me; I've asked many questions, so there's plenty to learn from.)

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    "It does this even if I explicitly say not to." Wow, I wonder why. There's this thing called "using something it's not designed for"... No, wait, is there? At least that's what's happening. Commented Aug 3, 2023 at 16:13
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I am not entirely against showing voting arrows on the source page, only and only if it's used as a feedback to your model and would not be counted towards the actual vote tally.

With that, we can hit two birds with one stone:

  • Providing feedback to the model for training
  • Getting new users familiar with the voting system

You should consider showing the arrows as is, but upon users interaction, show a pop-up encouraging them to visit the source and vote on the post itself (Not related to search bar, but it would be helpful if the votes tally and vote arrows color changed even if the user does not have voting privileges; the same message that appears now can be shown, and the vote count can go back upon refreshing the page).

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I like the idea of having an intelligent search to find a list relevant questions/answers for my problem.

However, I'm afraid that showing an AI-generated summary of these answers will result in a huge drop in voting activity. If the AI summary sufficiently answers the question of the user, I think many of them will be happy and move on, without going to the actual questions/answers and upvoting them. In the long term, this could be a serious problem for SO.

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    One possible success metric for contributions could be how often the answer was used to create a summary. But that might simply be too indirect to infer anything on the quality of the answer. If then the quality of a post cannot be evaluated anymore the algorithm doesn't know which answers to use, will select low quality answers and give a summary that isn't helpful. People might not find an answer there to their question and may only have wasted their time. That would be one way the whole thing can fail and take the rest of Stack Overflow with it into the abyss. Commented Jul 28, 2023 at 11:58
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    Just wanted to point to other comments where we addressed some of these concerns. See here and here.
    – Sasha StaffMod
    Commented Jul 31, 2023 at 20:49
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  1. ban generative AI as "correct looking answers may be incorrect"
  2. make your own ai
  3. AI generates "correct looking answers" which "may be incorrect"
  4. profit!?
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I asked it a question completely unrelated to programming:

Why is Mario Sports Mix widely considered a mediocore game?

Now, it should not answer this question, because A. it's off-topic, and B. it has no knowledge on that. But it did anyway, with a completely unrelated answer:

To properly execute the build function in the CS50 Week 1 Mario less comfortable problem, you need to call it after the do-while loop in the main function. Add the line build(height); after the loop. Alternatively, you can integrate the code from the build function into the main function if it only needs to be executed once.

In the CS50 Games Track Mario problem, to solve the issue with the end of level procedural generation, you need to make sure that the x variable reaches self.mapWidth - 7. You can do this by modifying the code in the Map.lua file. After filling the map with empty tiles, you can add code to create the pyramid and flag pole at an appropriate distance from the end of self.mapWidth. Then, continue with the while...do loop formula from the class code. Additionally, you may need to adjust the self.mapWidth value in the function Map:init() function to allow more room for the end of level area.

Then, I asked it this:

Which sports are in Mario Sports Mix?

To which it responded:

Oops, this topic is outside our expertise

We’re unable to answer any questions on this topic as it doesn’t appear to be programming-related. For best results, try asking questions about coding, programming, or software development.

...which is how it should've repsonded when I kicked off the conversation. An even worse example is when I asked it this:

What's the secret behind MangoDB's O(1) performance?

The answer should've either been something like one of these:

I'm sorry, I don't know the answer to that.

You may have made a typo, did you mean MongoDB?

or even, the correct answer:

The reason it's capable of responding so fast is due to the fact that all the data is sent to /dev/null, the content of which is erased on write.

But no, it talks about CouchDB and then goes onto talk about a different database (MongoDB):

CouchDB is a NoSQL database that sacrifices robustness and resilience to gain speed. It is not designed to be used the same way as a SQL database, as it does not store relational data. Instead, it is commonly used to store lists. Additionally, CouchDB is not fully ACID compliant and does not support rollbacks. MongoDB, on the other hand, is a document-based NoSQL database that provides weak consistency guarantees and does not have to guarantee consistency like SQL. MongoDB's speed can be attributed to factors such as its non-transactional model, explicit locking, and the use of different write concerns. However, it is important to note that the speed of a database can vary depending on the specific use case.

This is... bad.

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There's a mention of something called "Tag Clusters" during the talk

enter image description here

How do these work, and do they translate to the public Q&A platform in any way?

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    This is a feature for the Enterprise Knowledge Ingestion on Teams and not part of what we have previewed in the above post. :)
    – Bella_Blue StaffMod
    Commented Jul 27, 2023 at 12:40

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