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It has already been established that questions asking for when a new software feature will be released are not acceptable on Stack Overflow since they are customer service-related questions. However, sometimes a question become about a feature request in the case where the asker is unknowingly asking about something that isn't possible at the moment.

"When will it be possible?" vs "Is it possible?"

Although the difference can be subtle, as soon as the person asks for "when", it means they know that the feature they need is not available and the question should be closed as off-topic. Things are less obvious when the question is about whether something "is" possible or not.

When the author genuinely doesn't know if they just missed something in the documentation or if there is an undocumented feature/workaround that allows them to do what they want, it feels like the question is acceptable, but sometimes the answer is just "No, it's not possible".

It's not possible but...

Based on this answer on how to handle "impossible" questions, I get that it's acceptable to answer with something like "you cannot do x, do y instead". However, when the only thing to be done instead is to open a feature request on UserVoice or an issue on GitHub, should that be part of the answer?

Having a link to the site where to ask for the feature or to an existing feature request seems like a good way to make sure people are redirected to the right place instead of Stack Overflow. It will also prevent new users from asking a duplicate question trying to get updates on the progress of that feature.


An Example

This question asks if something is possible to do with the Office JavaScript API. They get the correct information in a comment saying that it's not possible.

Still, because there wasn't any accepted or upvoted answer, I was not able to use this question as a target for a duplicate question like this one. Then I realized from a comment saying that "...I needed to check if there was an update about it" that it was a "duplicate in disguise"; the question written as "is it possible", but it was really asking about "when is it going to be possible".

But in the end, I shouldn't have to dig into the motives of the asker. Ideally I should be able to indicate that it's a duplicate of the original sincere "is it possible" question.

Hence, to avoid future issue and based on my understanding of what should be done. I went to the original post and posted an answer. This way we can at least eventually have a dupe target.

While looking for an existing issue on the dedicated Microsoft 365 Developer Platform Forum (UserVoice's replacement), I noticed that there was none. At that point there had been three questions on Stack Overflow asking for the same feature, so I decided to take into my own hand and create one. (The third one has been deleted, but is still indexed on Google.)

Note that my original answer contained a link to the feature request I created with a suggestion to go upvote it (instead of posting on Stack Overflow). I since removed that plea to avoid it looking like some self-advertisement, but I'm still under the impression that this answer is a valid (albeit not great) answer. Am I mistaken?

TLDR: Is it acceptable to answer "impossible" questions by saying it's (currently) impossible with a link to an existing feature request, and then use that question as a duplicate target if anyone asks for a similar thing?

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    It's impossible to prove that something is impossible but it's possible to strongly motivate that something is impossible and for me this would be a valid answer as any other. It's probably best practice to add version information to an answer, in that case they never become wrong, just outdated. Commented Jul 22, 2023 at 20:56
  • Regardless of whether it is acceptable, do also consider the question "How will such an answer be received?". Can you live with a downvoted answer that speaks the truth? If not, then I would only write such answers when you have compelling evidence to share. Regardless, saying that something is impossible is a good tactic. It makes people jump out of the woodwork to prove you wrong.
    – Gimby
    Commented Jul 25, 2023 at 8:28
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    "questions asking for when a new software feature will be released" are more like off-topic because they are primarily opinion-based (since 'when will X feature be released?" is essentially predicting the future).
    – TylerH
    Commented Jul 25, 2023 at 13:42

3 Answers 3

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Is it acceptable to answer "impossible" questions by saying it's (currently) impossible with a link to an existing feature request, and then use that question as a duplicate target if anyone asks for a similar thing?

I often do this. I add some things on top of that:

  • If I can come up with a workaround or a partial solution, show it.
  • If someone else has come up with a workaround or a partial solution, show it and link to the source.
  • If there is an official explanation of why the feature may take a while to get to, or be completed, or will not be considered, quote or summarize that and link to the source.
  • If there's a way for readers to increase the prioritization of the feature-request, explain how to do that, or link to an explanation of how to do that.
  • If there's a way for readers to get notifications about progress on the feature-request, mention how.
  • If the feature-request platform has official writing on what they consider common poor etiquette in engaging in discussion on feature-requests, make a small note about that (Ex. VS Code discourages making "+1" / "bump" comments in issue tickets, and instead encourages using comment reactions)
  • Subscribe to notifications on the feature-request so that I can keep my answer post up to date. At the moment, I'm subscribed to quite a few VS Code issue tickets and check up on my notifications every morning, and update any posts of mine that could use it.

One of the value-adds of Stack Overflow is that you save the reader the time of reading things and help them get rid of all the noise (such as one might find in forum / email / bug-tracker threads). By doing the above, I (hopefully) TL;DR all the useful info for them on the state of things and what- if anything- they can do about it right now.

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    "Subscribe to notifications" => That's impressive dedication. I'll freely admit I myself wait for a user to ping me to ask if the answer is still up-to-date, or to tell me it's not, in order to update my answer. Commented Jul 24, 2023 at 7:54
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However, when the only thing to be done instead is to open a feature request on UserVoice or an issue on GitHub, should that be part of the answer?

Yes, you should do that, and many answerers already do this in their answers.

I'm still under the impression that this answer is a valid (albeit not great) answer. Am I mistaken?

No, you are not mistaken--this is the correct thing to do. Ideally you'll bookmark the answer to come back later when the feature is added and edit your answer to include that new information.

On a related note, if you base your answer entirely upon an existing comment (in scenarios where there is no UserVoice site or feature request pathway, for example), I recommend just pasting the comment as a block quote with links to the comment, and mark your answer as a Community wiki,since you aren't really the author of the content. Then you can flag the comment for deletion.

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Many things are impossible until someone smarter works around the issue (like lack of an API).

While a question might explicitly ask for an API the OP is implicitly stating a problem to which there may be a solution the OP can't even suspect is possible.

So the question is valid even if an API doesn't yet exist.

Answers saying no solution exists could be detrimental to the discussion and I'd remove those unless they prove a solution is impossible (proving the impossible is many times impossible or too verbose though).

Update

Here's the perfect example for how some people are convinced something is not possible.

The first answer got the most votes (the one saying not possible).

https://superuser.com/questions/1776493/how-to-create-an-access-point-on-windows-10-bridged-to-the-physical-ethernet

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  • In a way that is the right approach. Instead of saying that something is impossible simply take the absence of solutions as it's impossible. If nobody says it's possible, then for all practical means it's impossible (for now). If there is a feature-request, that is by no means a solution and should rather be a comment. Commented Jul 25, 2023 at 12:05

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