30

TL;DR

There have been some statements about the community not following the rules based on a review audit (links below). Questioning a whole community based on one question is egregiously flawed. If that is actually the case, I'd love to see evidence of that systematic abuse and mishandling in the tag, so we can take meaningful steps towards addressing them.



Recently, there has been a discussion about a review audit which involved an question: Audit failed: why? Reason was not given

From the body of that post on Meta Stack Overflow:

Very black and white: as a newbie reviewer I could (temporarily) lose my reviewing privileges because is holding itself to low standards and there is no way for me to know that these arcane rules exist.

It is obvious that the user hasn't had extensive exposure to any tag, and their statement is just rooted in the feedback that they have received on Meta Stack Overflow. Nonetheless, considering that this question was Hot Meta, it attracted a lot of negative attention towards the question and arguably amounted to a smearing campaign against the community.

This comment, along with other remarks on that post, had led the OP believe that they can characterize a whole community as having "low standards". However, I cannot solely blame them for that statement as they are merely echoing what they hear (N.B.: the comment below was directed at me):

You and the other members of r do not get to pretend that the rules that apply to everyone else, do not apply to you. I do believe that it is time for me to break my curation strike for r specifically, and impose some order on a tag that has very obviously come to believe it is a law unto itself.


That question is doomed until moderators are back to handle it in an appropriate way (whatever that may be), but even then some damages are irreversible. Most importantly, the accusations towards a community of users (in this case, ) are worrisome. If there is evidence of abuse or misconduct, it should be presented on Meta, so we can discuss and find a proper resolution.1

While waiting for that evidence, I provided examples of similar questions in other tags, which are asking about "efficiency".2

  1. Using async/await for multiple tasks (11 answers)

  2. Is this efficient? (5 answers; from question: its working fine but is there a better more efficient simple way?)

  3. making a query more efficient (5 answers)

  4. What is the most efficient way to deep clone an object in JavaScript? (129 answers)

  5. Most efficient way to convert an HTMLCollection to an Array (13 answers)

  6. Checking if multiple variables is not null, undefined or empty in an efficient way (7 answers)

  7. Efficient algorithm to get the combinations of all items in object (6 answers)

  8. Most efficient way to iterate over all DOM elements (6 answers)

  9. Most efficient way to map function over numpy array (14 answers; the most upvoted answer is the benchmark of all the other solutions)

  10. Efficient way to rotate a list in python (33 answers)

  11. What is an efficient way to implement a singleton pattern in Java? [closed] (this one-liner question was closed but only after 47 answers and 850+ upvotes)

  12. Most efficient way to increment a Map value in Java (37 answers; from question: Update: I've done a test of several of the answers. See below.)

  13. How do I efficiently iterate over each entry in a Java Map? (58 answers)

  14. What is the most effective way for float and double comparison? (49 answers; from question: Does anyone know a smarter float comparer?)

  15. Efficient Algorithm for Bit Reversal (from MSB->LSB to LSB->MSB) in C (36 answers)

Following the same logic applied to Efficiently find the first of the last 1's sequence [closed], we should (have) close(d) most of these, because:

  • they are asking for efficient ways of doing some task

  • they are not very specific about what they mean by efficiency (memory, speed, etc.)

  • some of them don't have a sentence ending in ? question-mark

  • they attracted a lot of answers (some of which are comparison/benchmarking of other answers and actually in some cases not all of the answers produce "identical" results)

  • in most examples, OP already provided a solution to their problem3

Regardless of the quality of these questions, their mere existence shows that is not an anomaly among other popular tags.

All in all, I am trying to understand the basis of this claim that "members of R community are not following the rules and have lower standards". I admit that there are issues with the tag, as there are with other tags; but I cannot agree that the issues are fundamental.

When one says "low[er] standards", they should be able to answer some questions. What is your baseline? What standards are we talking about? Do you have substantial evidence for your claims? Have you performed any comparison between different subjects? Did you look at some statistics? Are those statistics representative of the problem and have some significance?


1. Discussion specific to the question in the audit was removed in the interest of brevity. See the revision history for context.

2. I have limited familiarity/knowledge with/about these tags (similar to the users who have acted on that question with limited knowledge of R) and would definitely consider SMEs opinions if I am mistaken about them being similar (expecting that they would also consider R SMEs explanations). To be clear, I don't believe all of these questions should be deleted, while some of them definitely need to be edited (and/or should be closed). On the contrary, a couple of these questions, amongst the ones that I do understand, are actually good (even stellar) posts altogether.

3. I am aware that older posts may reside on the site because of historical reasons, etc. Although in some instances, we can see that multiple highly upvoted answers were posted on these threads relatively recently and not all of these examples are from 10+ years ago.

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  • 5
    I mean... #4 is a posterchild for why these types of questions are awful.
    – Kevin B
    Jul 10, 2023 at 22:02
  • 2
    @KevinB I don't disagree. As I said, not all of these need to be closed. Some of them do. I am seeking evidence of systematic abuse in one tag, not arguing against issues in other tags.
    – M--
    Jul 10, 2023 at 22:10
  • 12
    I decided early on that I didn't care how languages I didn't follow (due to lack of interest or lack of expertise) asked and answered questions and filtered them out of my curation. Yes, sometimes I can pick off a crap question in a language I don't know, some questions are just universally bad, but sometimes they're just using terminology I don't understand and someone familiar with the tool or technology will be able to answer it cleanly and concisely. And that's not my problem. If the R people have a different answering culture, that's not my problem. Jul 10, 2023 at 22:52
  • 2
    @user4581301 thank you for your feedback. I just wanna say that the "answering culture" for R is not inherently different compared to other languages: meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/425423/…
    – M--
    Jul 10, 2023 at 23:15
  • 6
    That's a lot of text. Can you write a more concise statement of the question?
    – D.W.
    Jul 11, 2023 at 1:25
  • 25
    I find it hard to understand what much of the text in the post has to do with the main question. It also seems very focused on trying to read a lot into the opinion of one or two people, which might not be productive. The answers to that question don't imply that r has different standards. I'm not sure what that list of bad questions in other tags is supposed to prove; one can find examples of bad questions in any tag. Overall I'm having a hard time telling what your goal is -- are you trying to argue for a particular perspective? Seeking information from others?
    – D.W.
    Jul 11, 2023 at 1:26
  • 8
    I mean... a subpar question, unlikely to be useful, was answered by recognized members and heavily upvoted. Why shouldn't we conclude that this is a common occurrence within the r tag?
    – Kevin B
    Jul 11, 2023 at 2:17
  • 2
    @KevinB I'd not bring the concept of collectives to the discussion. I understand you have reservations about collectives, but RMs are no different from 129 high-rep users who have answered the "posterchild" ;). And a question with MRE which shows research is far from subpar. I find that question useful (as a future user) and that's why I awarded a bounty to one of the answers. I actually replaced part of one of my codes/apps with the approach that I found on that thread. So, by your definition, is that question now stellar? (I myself think it is just ok)
    – M--
    Jul 11, 2023 at 2:24
  • 2
    Is it more important to you to complain about a few comments made by others on a meta post, or to ask whether the standards in the r tag are comparable to other tags? I think you're trying to do too much in a single meta question. I encourage you to pick one.
    – D.W.
    Jul 11, 2023 at 4:27
  • 5
    If you want to express your opposition to a view expressed in a few comments, then I don't think a meta question is the right venue for that. If you want to understand what the community's perceptions of the R tag is, then I suggest focusing on asking that question (and you can remove a lot from the question and just ask it and let people answer). I recommend you avoid trying to both ask a question and also argue for one particular answer, in the same post, as that risks becoming argumentative rather than leading to information gathering.
    – D.W.
    Jul 11, 2023 at 4:27
  • 8
    I think it's a mistake to mix together a request for information together with your objections to a comment you saw about the R tag. I recommend you pick one. Best would be ask for information, without the emotional tone, and to gather information before forming a judgement. Alternatively, if you prefer to express your opposition, then make your case without mixing it together with a request for information. I think you're reading more into the upvotes on that question than is warranted. Not every upvoter necessarily agrees with every statement in that post.
    – D.W.
    Jul 11, 2023 at 7:30
  • 5
    @SamR The person that posted the comment was not a mod, but a regular user. Jul 11, 2023 at 8:05
  • 5
    The original problem was, that v2 of the question was audited: stackoverflow.com/revisions/76582182/2 But because everyone was seeing a different state of question, the chaos ensued. In v2 there is absolutely no question. The OP (v1) still contained verbose, which was a hint for what the asker was looking for. Jul 11, 2023 at 9:03
  • 4
    In my experience there is a whole subset of tags where people just think and do differently. Sometimes because the subject matter isn't strictly programming but programming-related and questions are more prone to be personal support. Whether we want it or not, there are "subcommunities". This is also true in the the other direction though, you'll find that under the C++ tag for example the quality standard is very high, much higher than say the Python tag. If you want to ask a positively received C++ question you had better do your homework and check it three times.
    – Gimby
    Jul 11, 2023 at 9:33
  • 3
    The post being discussed is a fine question to ask in general, just not a good question for Stack Overflow (as currently stands)... with some edits from OP, it could easily become a good one for Stack Overflow. Some sub-communities simply don't care about questions being good for Stack Overflow (Python is notorious for this), and just upvote/answer anything that comes along. I think R is much closer to Python in this regard than, say, the Haskell or C++ subcommunities, which tend to optimize very much for questions that are good for Stack Overflow.
    – TylerH
    Jul 11, 2023 at 13:38

2 Answers 2

17

TL;DR: There's no universal standards, and lots of variability between tags. R appears to be one of the more permissive tags. There's also no clear judgement on if that's a good or bad thing.


Close reasons, as defined by the help section, leave lots up to interpretation, such as how much detail, clarity and focus are needed exactly, and how similar two questions should be to be duplicates.

There's substantial variability between curators on how to apply these close reasons. This commonly leads to conflicts, of which we have plenty of examples on meta, where quite often, the meta audience doesn't agree either.

How close reasons are applied differs among tags, but it mainly differs among curators. For some, "Unclear" means "The question does not exactly specify a reproducible problem and expected resolution of that problem", while for others, it means "I have no clue what you're on about" and anything that's comprehensible is clear enough.

In some tags, a small group of curators (or even a single one) have taken it upon themselves to make sure questions that lack understanding on a concept get closed as a duplicate of a canonical explaining that concept, even though the question asks something very specific (e.g. the how to debug and what's an NPE canonicals, or in regex, just questions demonstrating a similar lack of understanding of that concept). R doesn't seem to do that very actively.

Some tags have an active community of curators that enforce quite strict standards, and make sure questions are rapidly closed if they don't contribute to the library of knowledge we want to build (C/C++ come to mind at the current time). R doesn't seem to have a lot of that either.

If you would ask me, personally, I'd certainly confirm R is one of the less strict tags currently on Stack Overflow. But having "hard data" to back this up is difficult. And it's not the only less strict tag. However, the clear, unambiguous bad questions seem to get weeded out quite effectively.

One I encounter a lot is SQL, where very localized well-defined questions very often get one or multiple answers, even though there might be tens to hundreds of questions demonstrating the underlying concept already.

There's also substantial variability across time, with less rules longer ago, and less available duplicates too.

This is a major challenge to both reviewers and people asking questions, since they need to be aware of what an acceptable question for that language at that time is. And to complicate matters, questions may have multiple tags, which can and has in the past led to conflicts between strict curators for one tag, and more permissive curators for another.

This is all very subjective, though. Researching these things properly is hard. There's coming up with random examples, but in each tag, you can come up with random examples of poorly moderated questions, if you look hard enough (and especially if you go back far enough, since this varies through time). You can look at recent closure rate, but that's both influenced by amount of curation, strictness of curation and how poor the incoming questions are. And you can look at specific recent examples, but some questions evade curation somehow, especially now that many curators are on strike.

The jury is also still out on if strict curation is a good or a bad thing. There's a spectrum between building a library of knowledge where each question needs to provide a unique and helpful insight on programming, and trying to be the most helpful you can be to people that ask questions. Most curators and tags have a place on this spectrum, but I can't answer where they should be.

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  • 1
    Thank you for your feedback. I just wanna mention that c specifically has less closed questions compared to r, but I am not sure if that means better questions are asked there, or something else. All in all, I find your answer a fair and balanced assessment.
    – M--
    Jul 11, 2023 at 13:46
  • 2
    As noted, these are just my experiences, and it's really hard to go beyond that since quality of questions asked is a major variable. Might be a bias that I'm fairly competent at R, but a novice at C, so might overestimate the quality of C questions.
    – Erik A
    Jul 11, 2023 at 14:01
  • 4
    @ErikA: I am pro Q&A, thus tend to be pro curation in general... but even I recognize the limits. There's nothing worse that coming across someone who asked the very question you have, only to be re-directed to a question & answers page that is seemingly about something completely different. I do blame the UI here -- "Duplicate" is a terrible name, I wish we could point to individual answers, etc... -- but there's also an issue with SME finding obvious connections that less expert users... don't. Yet, getting an avalanche of poor results is terrible, too. Hard to find the right balance. Jul 11, 2023 at 14:22
  • 2
    Yup, I often leave comments with which answer applies and some details on how to apply the solution for nonobvious duplicates, which is great for the asker and users that are logged in, but does nothing for the user that finds the question on Google and is instantly redirected to the duplicate.
    – Erik A
    Jul 11, 2023 at 14:51
  • 1
    "R appears to be one of the more permissive tags." Is this really true? What is this statement based on? Maybe there is some statistical evidence for it like questions closed vs. average score or I don't know what. Jul 11, 2023 at 17:58
  • 6
    @NoDataDumpNoContribution, Your question is already answered directly in the answer itself: "If you would ask me, personally, I'd certainly confirm R is one of the less strict tags currently on Stack Overflow. But having "hard data" to back this up is difficult." <--- That is very clear about what it is based on - personal experience/opinion.
    – D.W.
    Jul 11, 2023 at 18:14
  • @NoDataDumpNoContribution if you look at rate of closed questions on top 15 tags, R and Python have the lowest rated (<1.5%; based on a SEDE query). However, SEDE does not keep track of deleted questions and in r and python closed questions tend to be roomba'd more (personal experience, I have no data for this). Hence, I don't find calling R or Python a more permissive tag out of place, but a cesspool as some other users said, I call those statements baseless BS.
    – M--
    Jul 17, 2023 at 16:21
  • @M--ßţřịƙïñĝ To get a realistic picture we could track the fate of the next 100 questions in the R tag and some other popular tags and compare them, we just need to keep track of newly created questions and somebody with enough rep to also see deleted questions. Jul 17, 2023 at 20:51
  • @M--ßţřịƙïñĝ As I said before (and if not said then definitely meant), this is not a prosecution. Everyone is entitled to have an opinion and can present it at any time without needing to present any facts as backup whatsoever. If everyone thinks the R tag is badly curated then this is no proof of it but still everyone will think so. This is probably all you can get here. Jul 18, 2023 at 16:59
  • @NoDataDumpNoContribution don't take that sentence literally. That is just a quote for fun. And, most definitely everyone is entitled to their opinion and expressing it nicely. And everyone is entitled to challenging those opinions. And as long as those opinions don't translate to abuse (it's been said that they need to enforce order on the tag; which resulted in VTC/VTR war), the discussion is productive.
    – M--
    Jul 18, 2023 at 19:07
22

The tag is a special case here on meta because it's highly visible. Most (all?) popular tags have at some point or another crossed meta, but r is the only highly active one that has a collective attached to it making it far easier to notice a pattern (regardless of whether or not one exists!) any time an r question ends up on meta given that the odds of a question having an answer from someone with a RM star is relatively high. It's easy to draw the conclusion that the r tag is being poorly handled when case after case of questions that are... less then stellar keep being represented on meta, handled by the "same" users. This audit was an exceptional case given it was answered by not 1 RM, but 4!

If you've spent any time on meta (I know you have), you'd know the tag is also a tag that is considered to have very low standards. There's 5-6 well known users in the regex tag space that routinely end up bickering on meta over question handling... but it's considered low standards because it's a set of tags that routinely get questions that are only useful to one person that also routinely receive multiple answers from high-rep users anyway.


It's just frustrating, as a curator, to watch enthusiastic users of a high traffic tag promoting useless content to this degree. Is it worse than ? ? ? I doubt it... they're just unsalvageable at this point.

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  • Besides the post in question, has there been any other ones on meta since the launch of R collective? I have seen many R questions on meta (as from other tags as you've mentioned), but probably have missed them recently.
    – M--
    Jul 11, 2023 at 0:54
  • At least in my case, it may not actually be seeing r questions directly here on meta, rather, any time the collective is brought up, i see the list of answered questions.
    – Kevin B
    Jul 11, 2023 at 0:56
  • 1
    Putting that aside, I understand your reasoning. However, I never believed specific cases are off-topic, if they can be explained through an MRE. Genuinely asking, is my understanding of off-topic/on-topic flawed in that sense?
    – M--
    Jul 11, 2023 at 0:56
  • 2
    No, you're correct. not being a stellar, useful to future users question isn't an off topic reason anymore.
    – Kevin B
    Jul 11, 2023 at 0:57
  • Well, checking the questions/answers on your own is different from being on meta, but I see. Thanks.
    – M--
    Jul 11, 2023 at 0:58
  • 2
    When was "being stellar" a criterion for questions? Again, I am honestly asking, not arguing against/for it.
    – M--
    Jul 11, 2023 at 1:09
  • 1
    we had a too localized close reason that, while not necessarily a "Not Steller" close reason, was focused on questions that were of no use to anyone outside of the asker (and maybe as a fun challenge for answerers.) Questions that by definition serve no purpose to the knowledgebase, but it was too abused apparently.
    – Kevin B
    Jul 11, 2023 at 1:12
  • I vaguely remember something (do I?), but it was either before my time or before when I dipped my toes into VTC pool. I will search for it to see the history and understand how it was abused. Thanks.
    – M--
    Jul 11, 2023 at 2:28
  • 4
    Here it is, though i 100% disagree with their conclusions on the new close reasons covering what it was for. This change opened the flood gates on useless debugging questions that now plague the network. MSE: Closing changes: [on hold], unclear, too broad, opinion-based, off-topic reasons, bye-bye to Too Localized
    – Kevin B
    Jul 11, 2023 at 2:31
  • 1
    Appreciate the link. So essentially we had a close reason that was used for closing "user-specific" questions. If we apply that restriction, very very few questions will be on-topic these days. I don't know if that's good or bad, necessarily. Putting that aside, that close reason heavily relies/relied on interpretation of close voters, hence 50% misuse. Don't you agree? Too Localized was closed as Opinion-based ;)
    – M--
    Jul 11, 2023 at 2:45
  • 4
    Regarding regex, we have to admit that being an encyclopedia is not the only goal of the site, some people are simply here to help other people get their stuff done. And that means answering very specific, otherwise not very useful, questions.
    – kutschkem
    Jul 11, 2023 at 11:22
  • 3
    @kutschkem: "we have to admit that being an encyclopedia is not the only goal of the site" => At the very least, the original goal was for SO to be a curated Q&A site. I wouldn't be surprised if SO inc preferred all questions to be answered -- more traffic -- and would like the shift the goal, but that wasn't what SO was supposed to be, nor admittedly what I signed up for. I don't necessarily mind a "help center" with people answering random questions again and again (hello, Eternal September) but then we need to differentiate between encyclopedia questions and one-off questions. Jul 11, 2023 at 14:33
  • 4
    @KevinB For the record, I remember this very differently: at the very beginning Stack Overflow used to be much more permissive than it is now. It then progressively tightened the screws over the years, but changing the close reasons (e.g. your link) didn’t materially impact the number of questions closed (in fact, we have data on this! Anybody keen to dig it up?). I think your perception is largely an illusion because the total number of questions on Stack Overflow vastly increased, and the number of questions that remain open is a fraction of that, rather than remaining constant. Jul 12, 2023 at 7:29
  • 1
    (In fact, my guess is that the fraction of closed questions almost certainly decreased; but not because of any conscious decision to lower quality, but rather because the increased question volume creates a disproportionate moderation burden.) Jul 12, 2023 at 7:35
  • 2
    From a perspective of a person that has the intentions to follow the mission strictly, this is indeed true. It can be frustrating. But as I already said there are subcommunities and those subcommunities don't see it that way, they occupy their own little corner of the site and try to not bump heads with others. I don't really call it unsalvageable, just... a corner of the site I don't interact with. Can't be bothered by that which I don't choose to look at.
    – Gimby
    Jul 12, 2023 at 10:10

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