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I recently asked this question about whether it was on-topic to ask if there is a right way to organize child structs within a project's files. An answer to this question answered by saying No, because it's opinion-based.

Another user came and marked my question as a duplicate of a question he found to be "the best reference question I could about why opinion based questions are off topic"

Clearly, this is a very different question to the one I asked. My question tries to know whether a particular question is on-topic, which includes knowing if it's opinion-based, whereas the linked question is more of a follow-up question on why the answer that I accepted is correct about opinion-based questions being off-topic.

My question wasn't: "Is this opinion-based question on-topic?". My question was aiming to know if a question is on-topic, which includes knowing if it's opinion-based.

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    What's not clear? Yes, it's off-topic, because it's opinion-based.
    – Cerbrus
    Jul 9, 2023 at 10:21
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    @Cerbrus I don't know if you have read what I said, but nowhere in this post did I say that it was not clear that the question is off-topic. Rather, this is about the validity of the close reason. Jul 9, 2023 at 11:03

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The purpose of duplicate closure is to point to existing posts that answer your question. On main this is supposed to be a more or less direct answer within the duplicate post, but on meta sometimes there are multiple steps or arguments involved in addressing an issue.

In this case one way to look at the issue is to divide it into three steps: 1. in which files to put structs is a question about coding style, 2. coding style questions are opinion based, 3. opinion based questions are unsuitable for the site. When choosing a duplicate target either of the three steps could be selected as the part that "answers your question", depending on the level of development of the argument.

Here the person closing the question selected step 3. They could have also opted to choose step 2, using questions like Downvoting or deleting coding style questions or Where to ask about code formatting/style as target. Step 1 is fairly specific but that is already addressed in comments under your question, and even if the comments were not there it would be more or less self-evident that this is a coding style question.

If the final step of the discussion was the best target or not may be opinion-based :D but what matters is that you, and future visitors, get a rather complete summary of the specifics and general aspects of the on-topicness of this type of questions, from reading your question, the comments, the answer, and the duplicate target, so the closure mechanism has done its job.

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  • I didn't find it to be "self-evident" that it was a coding-style question, nor did I know that all coding-style questions are opinion-based. And just because people in the comments explained this, it doesn't change the question that I asked. The question remains the same regardless of what happens after the fact. And there was no point at which the argument developped to questioning why opinion-based question are off-topic, to which the suggested duplicate could provide an answer. Jul 9, 2023 at 11:01
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    @MehdiCharife the point I was trying to make is that maybe the duplicate closure skipped a few steps but eventually the answer to your question can be traced back to the issue of opinion-based questions. It might have been better to choose a duplicate target that is closer to your concrete issue in the chain of reasoning, but the combination of your question, comments, links, and duplicate should be sufficient to get the full picture. In this regard meta is a bit different than main, there is more freedom for duplicates to be a 'piece of the puzzle' instead of the full answer.
    – Marijn
    Jul 9, 2023 at 13:03
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    "I didn't find it to be "self-evident" that it was a coding-style question" - you're unsure of whether you "should" do things one way or the other, and which is "right", and whether you'd be "better off" one way or another. It wouldn't make sense to wonder any of these things if you have tried them (i.e., done the expected minimum level of research) and found that one works and the other clearly doesn't; and in fact, both can work. Therefore, it's a coding style question. This is the basic logic used to answer "is this a coding style question?" in every case; it doesn't get more evident. Jul 9, 2023 at 13:52
  • @KarlKnechtel I know that both can work. I already tried doing both. And no, it can make sense to wonder those things even if you have tried both methods, but not in any large-scale capacity. By virtue of arguing otherwise, you imply that there is a "right" answer to the question, thus contradicting yourself in the process. That said, the fact that two strategies can work doesn't mean that the only difference between them is a one of style. You also failed to address the part where I didn't know whether all questions about coding style are opinion-based. Jul 9, 2023 at 14:06
  • "And no, it can make sense to wonder those things even if you have tried both methods, but not in any large-scale capacity." It certainly can. That is still a coding style question. "By virtue of arguing otherwise, you imply that there is a "right" answer to the question" No, not at all. Quite the opposite. The entire point is that coding style questions don't have objectively correct answers. After you do the research, and find that it "works" both ways, you have a style question until you can refine the definition of "works" in a way that can be addressed objectively. Jul 9, 2023 at 15:22
  • "That said, the fact that two strategies can work doesn't mean that the only difference between them is a one of style." For our purposes, it certainly does, unless you propose an objective metric in the question. All of this is extensively covered in the help section. "You also failed to address the part where I didn't know whether all questions about coding style are opinion-based." ??? Okay, here I'm genuinely confused - I can't understand how it's possible to "not know" such a thing. Perhaps the dictionary definition of "style" would help? Jul 9, 2023 at 15:23
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    @KarlKnechtel to be fair there are couple cases where "both approaches work" have explicit answer which is better (i.e. code with SQL injection work almost as good as one without)... but indeed those case are extremely rare and would 100% be commented as such and closed as duplicate. Jul 10, 2023 at 17:08
  • @AlexeiLevenkov Security is an objective criterion; it just needs to be identified, and then people can trivially just demonstrate SQL injections to show the lack of security. Something like maintainability would require a metric, and then perhaps studies. Even then, intuitively it's getting far afield of what we want to try to answer here. Jul 10, 2023 at 17:12
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I haven't voted to close on your question, but let me try to theoretisize what happend there.

Questions containing phrases like "if I'd be better off" with no very specific explanation what "better off" means in the exact case are opinion based. I believe it is self-evident. And it is hard to believe you don't see it to, as you on your own used the following phrase in the original question:

if there is a "right" answer to this problem

Since we established that discussed hypothetical question is opinion based, and it is safe to assume you know that too, it is only a matter of "should opinion based questions be closed?". But this is already answered elsewhere.

As a result your question is closed as duplicate.

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