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If you don't know much about a subject and are looking to learn, is it generally better to write very short questions on Stack Overflow and then only add information when you are prompted by commenters to add that information?

I recently asked a question Foreign key usage in low-moderate complexity database where I spent a lot of time writing context around the key question, "Is it generally better to have a great many foreign keys densely connecting entities/tables to each other, or is it preferable to have as few foreign keys connecting entities/tables together as possible? Where do you draw the line?"

After posting, I received some downvotes on my question and comments asking me to provide even more information (on entity relationships). I provided this additional information, and then got a great answer to my question.

Nevertheless, I feel I wasted my time writing such a detailed question since the comments (and downvotes) imply that those reading the question didn't care about most of the information I had written and instead only cared about the entity relationships which I didn't include in my initial question.

Yes?

I reviewed similar Stack Overflow questions after posting and discovered that they typically include very little information beyond their problem statement, the entities and entity relationships, and the system use case. Why are foreign keys more used in theory than in practice? How to assign primary key values into foreign keys? To me, this implies that the answer to this post is, "yes!"

https://meta.stackoverflow.com/a/297168/12713117 seems to be saying that if if you're going to add a ton of context to a question you should state your question at both the beginning and end of the question. Perhaps that would have helped.

I suspect another problem with my question was the XY problem where I was describing things which I perceived to be issues (ie several JOIN statements in my View query) and the commenters / Answer basically said: That's not a problem at all. That's expected.

I suspect that if I had provided less information up-front I might have received faster feedback that the premise of my question was flawed.

No?

On the other hand, the Stack Overflow question guidelines clearly ask posters to include details about the goal of the system, expected and actual results, and error messages; plus write what you've tried. Perhaps if I had not included so much information / context then a commenter would have asked for this information too.

If you don't know much about a subject and are looking to learn, is it generally better to write very short questions on Stack Overflow and then only add information when you are prompted by commenters to add that information?

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    If you don't know much about a subject and are looking to learn, then Stack Overflow is not the place for it to begin with
    – machine_1
    Jun 28, 2023 at 16:50
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    Critical information shouldn't be contained in a comment but the question body itself. In order to understand a question, that can be answered, you must understand the topic well enough to explain what you are asking. I have taken weeks of research and personal time, to understand a topic, before asking a question on SO in the past. When I have done that, the answers I received, were helpful. Jun 28, 2023 at 17:21
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    Does this answer your question? How long should we wait for a poster to clarify a question before closing?
    – gnat
    Jun 28, 2023 at 17:33
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    Writing good questions is hard, and often the result of writing a good question is never asking it because a good question-asking process is also a good question-answering process. Jun 28, 2023 at 17:53
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    @gnat-onstrike- That question + its answers + the comments here + the knowledge that you can see Close reason votes answers my question. Stack Overflow was not the correct place to ask my question because I didn't know enough to formulate a good question. Jun 28, 2023 at 18:01
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    Side note: "Is it generally better to have a..." question is very unlikely to fare well on SO. Such questions asking for opinions are hard to make fact-based... If indeed that what type of question you wanted to get answered SO may not be the right place to ask. (I have not checked the SO question itself and this comment is solely based on meta post) Jun 28, 2023 at 18:26
  • @gnat-onstrike- No, that is a completely different question.
    – TylerH
    Jun 28, 2023 at 18:27
  • @TylerH see above comment from OP
    – gnat
    Jun 28, 2023 at 18:42
  • @gnat-onstrike- I don't see what that has to do with the question here or the question you proposed as a duplicate. The question here is "should I start with a barebones questions and wait to see what info people need via comments". The question you proposed as a dupe target is "how long should we wait before VTCing questions that need more detail". The comment by OP you linked to is "this question probably wasn't a good fit for Stack Overflow". They are x, y, and z; none of them is the same as either of the other ones.
    – TylerH
    Jun 28, 2023 at 18:49
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    Note: There is no reason for a reviewer to return to a question later to see if it has been improved other than satisfaction in a job well done, so if said reviewer found the question wanting and downvoted it's unlikely that they'll drop by again in the future to revise their opinion of it after you have made edits. After the initial rush of viewers you're counting on folks in the future finding, learning from, and upvoting the question. If you open with a stack of downvotes because the question is initially weak it can be a long time before the improved question overcomes it's poor start. Jun 28, 2023 at 20:10
  • I would say that you generally should avoid doing anything that makes your question look worse than the hundreds of other questions that will be flowing in at the same time. Your question must outshine them. So no, don't write barebones questions. Don't write prose either though.
    – Gimby
    Jul 5, 2023 at 11:20

2 Answers 2

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After posting, I received some downvotes on my question and comments asking me to provide even more information (on entity relationships). I provided this additional information, and then got a great answer to my question.

Nevertheless, I feel I wasted my time writing such a detailed question since the comments (and downvotes) imply that those reading the question didn't care about most of the information I had written and instead only cared about the entity relationships which I didn't include in my initial question.

First, you cannot reliably link the downvotes and the comments. It is just as likely they are from different users as it is they are from the same users.

Second, did any of the comments indicate or suggest that some of this detail was irrelevant/unneeded, or did they simply ask for you to also include some additional info? It seems like the latter... If you had not included the other details you did, the inevitable comments may well have asked for that information, instead.

At any rate, the answer will always be "no"; you should include enough code or detail to reliably reproduce or answer the question objectively. If your question includes information that is irrelevant, that information should be removed. If you have information that is necessary to answer the question or that helps inform an answer, that information should be included.

If you have too much content, you will likely see comments (or "needs focus" close votes) suggesting that, instead.

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    I didn't realize until just now that I could see the Close reason votes. I received a "needs focus" close vote AND comments asking for more information. In other words, I needed to completely re-write my question. Jun 28, 2023 at 17:54
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where I spent a lot of time writing context around the key question, "Is it generally better to have a great many foreign keys densely connecting entities/tables to each other, or is it preferable to have as few foreign keys connecting entities/tables together as possible? Where do you draw the line?"

The problem here isn't how much or little context you provide. The problem here is that you are trying to ask people to make a subjective judgment that depends on specific details, for a general case. This does not fit the Stack Overflow format.

If it were possible in general to choose between two specific alternative designs (one of which uses many foreign keys and the other of which uses few) - if you could show a technique that allows designing either way for any problem - then you could ask a question about what factors to consider in order to choose between those two designs. But otherwise, you simply probably don't have a question that will work here. If you are trying to choose between two specific options that make sense for your specific project - well, we don't really do design here, especially not custom design. The only reliable way to find out which approach is better for you is to identify your metrics, try both ways, and see how they align with your metrics.

If you don't know much about a subject and are looking to learn, is it generally better to write very short questions on Stack Overflow and then only add information when you are prompted by commenters to add that information?

This can't properly be answered on Meta, for much the same reason that the question you describe couldn't properly be answered on the main site: it attempts a generalization that does not actually make sense.

How much you know about a subject doesn't change the appropriate level of detail for the question. That level is dictated by the question itself.

Some questions are naturally much more likely to be asked by beginners, or at least by people lacking specific domain knowledge. Experts in the field will generally recognize that, and tailor answers to that conceptual level while editing questions to distill the problem as neatly as possible. Or if the underlying problem is common, they'll close the question as a duplicate and if necessary leave a short explanation of why it really is the same question. (If they're really on the ball, they might pre-empt such questions by writing one themselves. Or they might get frustrated with all the low-quality duplicate options, and try to write something better.)

That said, if explaining the problem properly requires a lot of background that you don't have, try to acquire that background first. Sometimes you simply won't have a question that works on Stack Overflow yet, and that's okay. It's perfectly acceptable - often even praiseworthy - to go to an actual discussion forum to try to figure out what the actual underlying problem is, figure out how to phrase a question that gets at the material that you struggled through with others on that forum, make sure you understand the answer you were given there, and then answer your own question. Just, you know, check that it isn't a duplicate, first.

Some questions - especially how-to questions - can be asked very tersely, and there is no good reason to elaborate on them. Others really require a brief code example in order to identify the point of confusion, illustrate a precise requirement for a how-to, or have a reproducible example of a problem. On the other hand, a few questions might include a really long error output, because of the importance of complete error messages. And every now and then, when there is a surprising difference between results from two pieces of code, it might be appropriate to show both, show the results, highlight the differences and only then ask a question - which might add up to a lot. (I'm not saying this particular question is well edited; but it's the longest I could find that was over 1000 score, about Python, and that I thought would still be suitable for the site by today's standards.)


Nevertheless, I feel I wasted my time writing such a detailed question since the comments (and downvotes) imply that those reading the question didn't care about most of the information I had written and instead only cared about the entity relationships which I didn't include in my initial question.

There is a misconception built in here. Many times, a question is too long, and too detailed, because the OP has not spent enough time writing it. The most important aspect of research is figuring out what's actually relevant to the question.

For example, if there are hundreds of lines of code for a "debugging" question, the problem isn't that OP has wasted time on too much detail; the problem is that OP has not spent time on an individual debugging attempt. (We're not actually interested in doing debugging work here; we're interested in answering the question that remains after doing the appropriate debugging work to isolate the problem.)

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