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Update - the experiment has graduated!

Thank you all for your valuable feedback. Moving forward, we plan to continue to refine this model and iterate on this feature. Please continue to post your observations and if you notice more relevance in the suggested related questions.

The machine learning model for related questions has been graduated on Stack Overflow. That means it has been rolled out across the site (not including Meta Stack Overflow or SE network sites), and will be the feature used to recommend similar questions in the vast majority of cases. For now, the related questions displayed on pages of questions asked since February 2023 will still be generated by Elasticsearch, but we plan to reduce our dependence on this search engine over time to suggest related questions.

Why are we doing this?

Previously, we had announced that there would be another round of experimentation before reaching the graduation stage. However, due to the success of the last experiment, we made the decision to pivot our limited resources to other projects.

How we defined success

In our last update, we relayed the data from the V1 experiment:

Related questions recommended from the Machine Learning (ML) model generated a whopping 155% increase in clickthrough rate (CTR) in the aggregate. Please note, the variant group includes both questions from the model and Elasticsearch because newer/recent questions are not factored in, thus they fall back to being recommended by Elasticsearch. However, the majority of the clicks in the variant were from questions recommended by the model.

What about other metrics?

  1. Are users voting more?

    • Yes. Of the users who are able to vote, there was a 23% lift in overall votes combined (upvotes and downvotes).
  2. Are users commenting more?

    • Yes, we saw a similar trend as well with a 26% lift.
  3. What about voting or commenting attempts? (We defined attempts as users who aren’t able to vote due to being anonymous or lack reputation. This is used to measure intent)

    • We saw a 68-70% lift in users who attempted to engage (vote/comment) on related question pages in the variant group.

These numbers well exceeded our expectations. We felt it would be better to graduate in order to add value for users now as we continue to iterate, rather than waiting for all future experiments to be completed.

But was it really a success?

We understand that the graduation of this experiment may look short-sighted due to the feedback we received on our last two posts. Users had reported that they had not seen an increase in relevancy, but rather a worsening of the results.

However, we were able to check the data and determined that those who had reported seeing less relevancy in the suggested related questions were not part of the experiment group, meaning they were not seeing related questions generated from the ML model.

But we don’t want you to just take our word for it. In the spirit of transparency, we wanted you all to be able to check for yourselves. To know whether you’re seeing related questions from the machine learning model or Elasticsearch, you can inspect the related question’s URL.

  • URLs containing rq=1 or rq=2 indicate the related question is being recommended by Elasticsearch.
  • URLs containing rq=3 or rq=4 indicate the related question is being recommended by the machine learning model.

Moving forward

Graduation does not mean the end of the process. We plan to continue refining this model to increase relevance for users. We will do that in a number of ways, including:

  • Creating a mechanism to collect qualitative inline feedback directly in the interface, as many of you have requested here and here. This will allow us to incorporate human-in-the-loop feedback into the model.
  • Expanding the signals we collect, beyond just clicks, to better measure relevance.
  • Iterating the model using additional inputs beyond clickthrough rate, such as question body, top or accepted answer, code blocks/snippets, score, etc.

We believe this change will bring more relevant related question recommendations to all Stack Overflow users, and we look forward to hearing whether or not you notice positive changes once it goes live.

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    "Yes, we saw a similar trend as well with a 26% lift." - this isn't necessarily a good thing. A lot of comments are noise that need to be deleted, and act more as an indicator of why comments need an overhaul
    – Zoe is on strike Mod
    May 15, 2023 at 15:42
  • 31
    "Related questions recommended from the Machine Learning (ML) model generated a whopping 155% increase in clickthrough rate (CTR) in the aggregate." I think the position change from the sidebar to between the question and the answers accounts for most of this increase. You made the list much more in-your-face. Can we run the test again with the new model but with the list back on the sidebar? If the ML is the cause of the CTR increase, you should see similar CTR (a bit diminished due to less in-your-face positioning, but significantly higher than before either the move or the ML switch).
    – TylerH
    May 15, 2023 at 20:17
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    @TylerH The move from the sidebar is not part of this experiment; it was tested separately and had a +900% effect on CTR, as you might expect from moving a link from the side to the centre and making it bigger. meta.stackoverflow.com/q/423143/12299000 Unfortunately SO took the higher CTR to mean people benefitted from it.
    – kaya3
    May 15, 2023 at 20:28
  • Bella, will there be a way to check what group we were in for the first experiment after May 22nd? Because if there's not, you're not giving us much time...
    – user
    May 15, 2023 at 20:49
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    @user The guidance here about checking the url will still apply after graduation on May 22nd. At that point the vast majority of questions will be using the ML model, but a small number will still use Elasticsearch.
    – Sasha StaffMod
    May 15, 2023 at 21:05
  • okay... but what does that have to do with allowing us to check whether we were in the control or test group during the experiment? After all, isn't that what that section of the question post is about?
    – user
    May 15, 2023 at 21:10
  • There are no results for V2? Or are they still coming anyway? May 16, 2023 at 6:32
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    I checked and wasn't part of experiment group. Is there a way for me to see what the related questions generated from the ML model would be, to compare to the Elasticsearch ones?
    – Bob__
    May 16, 2023 at 8:42
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    @Bob__, beh no...! Is exactly what I've been asking since the beginning of the Experiment... (back in March 2023)
    – chivracq
    May 17, 2023 at 5:57
  • 4
    @chivracq Well, I can appreciate a double-blind control procedure during the experiment, but after the fact, when revealing its "success", I'd find informative to disclose those little details too ;)
    – Bob__
    May 17, 2023 at 8:09
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    @user sorry, I must have misread your question before. I don't believe there is any way to check which group you were in for the experiment after the fact. But, going forward people can check which way a related question was generated by checking the url after clicking the question.
    – Sasha StaffMod
    May 17, 2023 at 18:12
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    @Sasha oh... That paragraph confuses me then. When I read "in the spirit of transparency, [...]" after being told that the people who showed examples of less relevancy in related posts were in the experiment group, I expected that I would be hearing how to check up on the truthfulness of that statement. Especially in a section titled "But was it really a success?"
    – user
    May 17, 2023 at 18:17
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    I'd like to see this "feature" moved back to the sidebar where it was not intrusive and its clearly irrelevant/unrelated suggestions in the majority of cases will not be distracting. Fortunately a browser plugin like Adblock successfully hides it which is what I've personally done.
    – Stu
    May 22, 2023 at 7:59
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    @Stu Sorry, Stack Overflow doesn't do that sort of thing. It's stuck where it is now, until the next seagull manager finds an even more obnoxious place to put it (maybe between the question and the comments? or between random paragraphs? )
    – user253751
    May 24, 2023 at 2:06

3 Answers 3

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Thank you very much for giving this a dedicated Q&A post.


the related questions displayed on pages of questions asked since February 2023 will still be generated by Elasticsearch, but we plan to reduce our dependence on this search engine over time to suggest related questions.

As an estimate, how much would it cost to run this for all Q&A on SO?


Are users commenting more?

Please don't forget my (unaddressed) feedback from the previous announcement suggesting that comments not be used as a measure of success (TL;DR more comments very often means that something is wrong).

On the same point, I'm a little bothered about increased levels of comment activity / attempted comment activity being used as part of the justification to graduate this feature.

And the fact that you're graduating this without a second experiment (which can also serve as a dry-run) after telling us "We have decided to postpone the next experiment. When we updated the model we found something that was not acting as expected and did not want to move forward until it was resolved." just makes by brain go "... huh?"


URLs containing rq=1 or rq=2 indicate the related question is being recommended by Elasticsearch. URLs containing rq=3 or rq=4 indicate the related question is being recommended by the machine learning model.

What's the difference between 1 and 2, and between 3 and 4?


Creating a mechanism to collect qualitative inline feedback directly in the interface as many of you have requested

Great!


Iterating the model using additional inputs beyond clickthrough rate, such as question body, top or accepted answer, code blocks/snippets, score, etc.

Also nice to hear. Feel free to take a look at the rest of the suggestions we made in What would you like (/have liked) to see SE Inc. try in their experiments for machine learning-powered links in the "Related" post UI section?.

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    gotcha. 1 and 2, and 3 and 4, indicate the two different locations, one being below the question and the other being in the sidebar. Sidebar is 1 and 3
    – Kevin B
    May 15, 2023 at 18:22
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    I considered the pseudo-transparency hypothesis, but it doesn't entirely check out: they have Google Analytics (which checks this), and they know server-side what they're serving to whom. The implementation of the mechanism was chosen to be transparent, of the choices they had available.
    – wizzwizz4
    May 19, 2023 at 7:16
  • @wizzwizz4 not sure why I didn't think of that. I edited that portion of my post out.
    – user
    May 19, 2023 at 7:56
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However, we were able to check the data and determined that those who had reported seeing less relevancy in the suggested related questions were not part of the experiment group, meaning they were not seeing related questions generated from the ML model.

When deciding to go forward and graduating the experiment, you claimed you checked that all those who reported the worsening of relevance were in the group that didn't see the list generated by the model. However, if the method provided in the announcement for determining whether lists of questions are generated by the model or not is correct, I believe you made a horrible mistake by releasing the feature.

Let's go check lists of related questions where the URLs indicate the list was generated by the model (rq=3). All of the screenshots below show lists of related questions shown on posts exclusively about TypeScript (which I am a subject matter expert in). The lists are consistently full of items about:

  • D3.js library (DOM manipulation) on a post about enum type inference in an ORM:

    related questions all about the D3.js library on a post about enum type inference in an ORM

  • Jetty (servlets) on a post about tuple type distributivity

    related questions all about Jetty on a post about tuple type distributivity

  • Laravel (a PHP framework) on a post about type unions:

    related questions all about Laravel (PHP) on a post about type unions

  • Pandas (data analysis package for Python) on a post about type inference:

    related questions all about Pandas (Python) on a post about type inference

The list goes on indefinitely with every list sharing the same core traits:

  • each item completely misses the point on what the question is about;
  • nearly all items share the same theme (which is utterly wrong to begin with).

Are you sure you do not want to roll the change back to make sure it at least does not make lists of related questions even more nonsensical, especially given the "We believe this change will bring more relevant related question recommendations to all Stack Overflow users" statement?

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    I can confirm that this is true in every single case that I looked at in the tags where I am a subject-matter expert, as well as many other cases where I am not. Every time I saw a list that was actually slightly relevant (i.e., the list of related questions all had at least the same tag as the question), the questions had "rq=2" in the URL, suggesting that they were generated by the traditional Elasticsearch query, whereas all of the questions that had "rq=3" or "rq=4" in the URL (which presumably came from the AI model) consistently had nothing whatsoever in common with the question. May 26, 2023 at 12:11
  • 1
    I've heard several SMEs say that Pandas is becoming a dumpster fire tag like SQL... It's doubtful anyone can sort out such a tag, but missing "type inference" as a subject is saying a lot about the AI's performance.
    – bad_coder
    May 26, 2023 at 17:17
  • Ah, that might explain why click-throughs and such increased: people had to click more links to find what they need. I was skeptical of people commenting that more engagement is bad without saying why (why wouldn't it be good if people find more content they want to see?), but maybe now I see a point to that argument. If that is indeed what is happening. I'm not sure the right experiment was run to really tell.
    – Luc
    Jul 31, 2023 at 21:49
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Are there any plans to have this feature apply to more recent questions, or even on all questions from the start? If not, how often do you plan to update the system? It seems we're still at the point where only posts prior to February have had the improved results applied.

Having this automatically occur on new questions could significantly improve dupe finding.

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