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I posted a question to Stack Overflow yesterday which was rejected because I was told that it doesn't address a programming-related issue. I edited the question with a very detailed explanation of how it does indeed address a programming issue and I added more information to make that clear, but all I got in return were snarky comments and false accusations of my being dishonest about what I was explaining.

Since the question had been marked as "closed", I incorrectly assumed that it was effectively deleted, because at the time, I didn't understand the difference between "closed" and "deleted" as these terms are used here.

Incorrectly thinking that my question was considered to be "deleted", I posted another similar question, and this time, I very carefully and clearly showed how it does indeed represent a programming question, and I gave very specific details that illustrated this point. This clearly addresses and resolves each and every point that was originally raised in complaint of the old question.

However, soon thereafter, this new question was also marked as "closed", because it was deemed to be a duplicate of that other question. That's when I learned the difference between "closed" and "deleted".

Anyway, I then went back to the original question and tried to actually delete it. However, my deletion request of my own original question was not accepted, because this original question was now deemed to be a duplicate of my new question.

So, my old question cannot be deleted because it is deemed to be a "duplicate" of my new question, and my new question cannot by reopened, because it's deemed to be a "duplicate" of my original question.

I'm in a Catch-22 here.

So... I went back to my old question and edited it once again, and this time, I removed all of the original content and simply wrote a short message, literally begging that this question be deleted. I even changed the title of the question to indicate that its original content has been removed, and that I wish the entire question to be deleted.

As of a few minutes ago, the original question still has not been deleted.

And the new question still references the old question as a "duplicate", even though the old question now contains no text referring to the original topic, and that old question just contains a small amount of text which begs for it to be deleted.

What procedure must I go through in order to I resolve this massively crazy situation?

All I want now is for the original question to be totally deleted so that the new question will not seem to be a "duplicate" of anything.

I'm hoping that there is a "supervisor" or "ombudsman" or some sort of person or people in authority whom we could go to and get these kinds of crazy situations resolved. I'm hoping that coming here and posting about this issue could get me in touch with a real human being who could actually help me with this.

Thank you very much in advance.

Update: I went back just now to check on my original question, and the changes I made were completely removed and the original message was restored!!! These changes are where I deleted all of the original content of the question and replaced it all with a short message begging that the question be totally deleted.

In other words, I drastically changed the original message text so that it only asks for deletion of the question and nothing else, but somehow, the text that was previously there was restored so that it looks like I made no changes whatsoever.

This is an even crazier situation now!

I once again replaced the original message text with a plea to simply delete the message. I wonder whether that plea will also soon be replaced with my original message, once again.

I hope not! ... but after all I've been through with this, I'm not optimistic.

Conclusion: Thanks again to all of you who helped me here.

Special thanks to those who did so in a patient, pleasant manner.

The results of my coming here which are staying with me are ...

(1) ... a much greater knowledge of the posting conventions for the Stack Exchange forums, for which I'm indeed very grateful.

(2) ... I now know never to come to the Meta forum again if I have any similar issues or questions in the future. I know some people outside of Meta who would have answered my questions and helped me gain understanding quickly and efficiently, without all of the secondary pontification and condesension that I received here, and I made a big mistake in not contacting them first concerning my confusion about closing and deleting my question.

I have deleted my original question about ChatGPT, because (1) it seems like there is no answer to it in the first place, given the current state of ChatGPT, and (2) some of the secondary feedback from my having come here to Meta has attracted a greater amount of negative attention to that post and a greater amount of verbiage in response to the question which has nothing to do with the technical issue that I was asking about.

Thank you again to those who helped me here, and again, extra special thanks to those who did so in a kind and non-condescending manner.

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    First rule: never replace the content of your question with PLEASE DELETE THIS QUESTION!. There is not a single argument that validates that action.
    – rene
    Apr 30 at 19:51
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    Questions aren't "rejected" (though they potentially will be with the staging ground, but you're not a user that is likely to be sent there). Questions can be closed, locked, and deleted, but there's apart from certain spam filters, nothing will reject your question and stop it being published.
    – Thom A
    Apr 30 at 19:52
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    SHOUTING at the user base is an excellent way of getting your question closed prematurely. SHOUTing is considered rude and many user will downvote and VTC a question purely because of that.
    – Thom A
    Apr 30 at 19:55
  • Yes, I said "rejected", but I actually meant "closed". In any case, I want my orginal question to be totally deleted. How do I go about doing that. My all-caps shouting is in the second message and has nothing to do with that message being deemed a "duplicate" of the first one that I wish to be deleted. But yes I'll get rid of the all-caps in the second message now. In the mean time, could someone please delete my first message? Thank you.
    – HippoMan
    Apr 30 at 19:58
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    On a separate please stop using code markdown. ChatGPT version 3.5 and ChatGPT aren't code, they are names; it's just ChatGPT version 3.5 and ChatGPT. I removed all that from your post and you've put it back... Code markdown is for code.
    – Thom A
    Apr 30 at 21:01
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    "but after all I've been through with this, I'm not optimistic." - not knowing the many rules and regulations of Stack Overflow will start to suck badly for you sooner or later. Luckily you admit your own personal involvement a lot quicker than most other people do. It is kind of amazing that it took 10 years in this case. Usually people come to this M.A.S.H. unit we call meta within a couple of weeks or even days after having stept on their first landmine. So you must have been doing something right all this time, just by you doing you. Good job.
    – Gimby
    May 1 at 12:50
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    Please before you consider asking questions about SO & meta.SO in a post or comments start googling them using 'site:' at sites stackoverflow.com/help, meta.stackoverflow.com & meta.stackexchange.com. Don't just ask us without bothering to research. The same goes for researching whatever post or comment questions you are considering at Stack Overflow. How to Ask Help center
    – philipxy
    May 1 at 13:53
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    The Stack Exchange sites are *** *** *** *** *** *** not *** *** *** *** *** *** forums (fora?). Stack Overflow was partly a reaction to terrible, terrible forums (trying to mine the gold nuggets out of pages and pages and pages and pages and pages of (divergent) conversation). As Atwood (one of the cofounders) said: "I am done with forums!" May 2 at 23:16

2 Answers 2

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There's a lot to unpack here.

First, yeah, closure and deletion are two separate processes. Closure just means a question can no longer receive new answers. Deletion marks it as invisible to most users (with exceptions to users with >10k reputation and moderators), disallows voting and closure, and only allows votes for undeletion.

Let's address the first problem, the one where you're trying to get this closed question deleted. According to How does deleting work? What can cause a post to be deleted, and what does that actually mean? What are the criteria for deletion? , you can't self-delete your own question if it:

...

  • has at least one other question that is marked as a duplicate of your question

Which yours does, because after your first question was closed, you posted a new question that asked the same (or similar) question as your original question. The community voted to close that as a duplicate of your original question as in their eyes you attempted to circumvent the closure by posting a new question.

As users mentioned in the comments there, the correct course of action is to edit your existing question in response to it being closed instead of posting a new one.

If you self-delete the question that's closed as a duplicate (this one) first, you should be able to self-delete the original question afterwords. However, I would recommend simply editing that older question to explain why you feel it's on-topic for Stack Overflow, including reducing the all-caps noise that Thom A mentioned if you were interested in getting it reopened and potentially answered.

I went back just now to check on my original question, and the changes I made were completely removed!!! These changes are where I deleted ALL of the original content of the question and replaced it ALL with a short message BEGGING that the question be totally deleted.

That's not acceptable practice on the Stack Exchange network. I recognize that that guideline is not immediately clear, but by posting on SE, you've irrevocably granted the Stack Exchange network the right to distribute that content under the CC BY-SA 4.0 license for as long as it sees fit to do so.

Moderators and users with the ability to vote to delete questions will not delete questions for you that you can't delete yourself. In other words, they won't bypass system restrictions for you.

You can visit this help center page for alternatives to deletion if you were interested.

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  • Thanks to all for your feedback. I have corrected my original question and want to stay focused on it now. The way I have posted here now and in other Stack-Exchange forums bothers more of you here than almost everyone else who has been responding to my posts over the years in those other forums. I now have learned more about what seem to be some posting conventions here, and I will do my best to adhere to them. But this meta-discussion is distracting me now from the actual technical question that I have been trying to resolve. So I'm deleting this question now. Thank you again to all.
    – HippoMan
    May 1 at 18:24
  • Oh ... I see that I can't delete this. Well, I'm just removing this question from my bookmarks.
    – HippoMan
    May 1 at 18:25
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    @HippoMan Yeah, similar restrictions that prevented you from deleting your question earlier are applying here. We like to keep questions with accepted/upvoted answers around for future reference. Eventually this question will stop getting additional activity so your inbox will no longer have items from it, just give it some time. Good luck! :)
    – Spevacus
    May 1 at 18:48
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You have been using Stack Overflow for over 10 years, and have two gold badges for "famous questions" which were not asked that long ago. You've been rewarded for a question with a +25 score before as well. You have over 100 total questions and ask them with somewhat reasonable regularity. You have reached 2000 reputation, which entitles you to make edits unilaterally.

All of which is to say, you are a pretty experienced Stack Overflow user and should therefore already very well understand all of the basic, fundamental stuff I am about to hammer you over the head with.

I edited the question with a very detailed explanation of how it does indeed address a programming issue and I added more information to make that clear

No, you didn't. You spent a lot of words asserting that it was a programming issue, but it isn't. Fundamentally, your question is about how to phrase input to ChatGPT in order to get it to respond in a certain way. You mentioned writing code in Python and using a particular AI to interface to ChatGPT, but you didn't show any Python code, didn't show anything about the APIs you are using. You said that you "ask about how to program ChatGPT with textual prompts", but textual prompts are not programming. On top of all of that, your justification reads like something that was itself written by ChatGPT.

Just for the record: ChatGPT processes input written in English, i.e., natural language. That is not a programming language, and thus "prompting" ChatGPT is not programming.

The vague language "keyword or attribute or set of configuration parameters" does not rescue this; if you meant that you propose to send something outside of the actual prompt (i.e., call the Python function differently, add additional query parameters to a web API call, etc.) then you were certainly not clear about this, and aside from that it would at the very least be your responsibility to attempt some research first, for example by reading the documentation for the APIs you mention. It seems pretty obvious here that there is nothing that directly "configures" ChatGPT to respond in specific ways; the entire point of a LLM is to allow the model to determine how to respond to the prompt by processing the prompt.

but all I got in return were snarky comments and false accusations of my being dishonest about what I was explaining.

I don't see anything snarky. Of course, comments are ephemeral and I wouldn't at all be surprised if the discussion has been cleaned up already. That said, Meta is not the right place to complain about this. If a comment is inappropriate, flag it. That's why there is a flagging system.

As for dishonesty: if you wanted to make the question specifically about the programming possibilities, you could have done so. As far as I can tell, you took basically no steps in that direction. It is your responsibility, as the person asking the question, to be clear about what the question is; and to make the question on-topic, clear, focused, specific, and not a duplicate. If everyone is understanding you in the same way, and that way is not what you intended, that's on you.

Since the question had been marked as "closed", I incorrectly assumed that it was effectively deleted, because at the time, I didn't understand the difference between "closed" and "deleted" as these terms are used here.

And you made this assumption in spite of the fact that:

  • When the question is closed, it puts a giant banner at the top with advice to you and links for resources (advice which specifically suggests editing the question);

  • People on Meta talk about these topics all the time, but you didn't think of searching previous Q&A on Meta before making your own post here;

  • There is an explanation in the help section of what closed questions are, which is directly accessible from the help front page and is also linked in the advice to you;

  • All your aforementioned experience with the site.

This shows basic disregard for the community you've been participating in for the last decade.

Here is the corresponding help entry for deleted questions, by the way.

Incorrectly thinking that my question was considered to be "deleted", I posted another similar question, and this time, I very carefully and clearly showed how it does indeed represent a programming question, and I gave very specific details that illustrated this point.

Again, no, you did not. That is because it doesn't represent a programming question, as far as I can tell.

Anyway, I then went back to the original question and tried to actually delete it. However, my deletion request of my own original question was not accepted, because this original question was now deemed to be a duplicate of my new question.

If you had read the Help entry for deleted questions, you would have understood this. It clearly tells you that a question cannot be deleted if "Another question has been closed as a duplicate of it", as you found.

The solution is to delete the second question first, since it is also yours. It appears that you've done so, so there should now be nothing preventing you from deleting the first one as well.

That said, please keep in mind that deleting questions will not help with the automated question-ban algorithm. This is out of our hands - moderators here are not generally employees of the company.

So... I went back to my old question and edited it once again, and this time, I removed all of the original content and simply wrote a short message, literally begging that this question be deleted.

Do not do this. This is vandalism. It would be terrible behaviour even on most discussion forums, because it's begging for specialized help without making any effort to try to figure out how the forum software works, what the relevant policies are etc.

But it's especially bad here, because Stack Overflow is not a discussion forum.

Again, there's a flagging system for a reason. If you require moderator assistance, you can flag your own question about it, or you can post on Meta. Nothing, however, ever justifies replacing the content of your own post with a "meta" message. Questions that you ask on Stack Overflow are not about you; they are contributions to a searchable Q&A library. They are not "posts" on a discussion forum. They should not be "updated" but only edited to clarify what the question is. The question is especially not "your" post; that's why you automatically put a CC license on it.

Someone who finds the post with a search engine should see a question that is about a specific programming problem. Not a person looking for help. Not a back-and-forth trying to figure something out. Not a casual conversation. Not someone trying to argue about whether the supposed question is on topic.

And certainly not an attempt to resolve an issue with OP's account.

Ever.

We do not care if you are "begging". Being obsequious doesn't make us more willing to help you. It simply underscores exactly why your conduct is inappropriate.

And the new question still references the old question as a "duplicate", even though the old question now contains no text referring to the original topic

Yes, because duplicate closure is done by the community, not based on some kind of automatic text recognition. To re-open a question requires appealing to the community through the standard process (which, again, is thoroughly documented and referenced to you where appropriate). We certainly aren't going to decide that your new question isn't a duplicate of the old question simply because you vandalized the old question. Instead, we're going to roll back the vandalism, perhaps make further edits to remove inappropriate meta commentary, and fix your formatting.

Which is exactly what happened, including a mini rollback war. If someone else rolls back your edit, do not just decide that you can roll back the rollback without some discussion.

I'm hoping that there is a "supervisor" or "ombudsman" or some sort of person or people in authority whom we could go to and get these kinds of crazy situations resolved.

There are moderators, but most cleanup work is done by the community. Again, this is something basic about how the site works that you could easily have looked up in the help section.

but somehow, the text that was previously there was restored so that it looks like I made no changes whatsoever.

Yes, that's called a rollback. It's there to fix vandalism, such as yours. Just like on Wikipedia. Text is "somehow" restored by the community because you do not unilaterally get to control the content of the question.

From your comments here:

you know that I have no intention of wasting anyone's time, and that this issue occurred solely because of my misunderstanding of the procedures here and nothing else.

If you actually didn't want to waste others' time, you would have taken the initiative to read the Help section and understand these basic things about our procedures, first. The conduct you have demonstrated so far is completely inconsistent with the claim. If you directly ask people to explain things to you that are already comprehensively explained in writing, then yes, you inherently are expecting other people to take time to explain the thing that they shouldn't have to spend - i.e., wasting it.

Lucky for you, I actually enjoy offering this kind of harsh critique.

I clearly explained that I only repeated the content in the 2nd message because I incorrectly thought that the first message had been removed. I thought that no one could read it any more, and hence, I wrongly assumed...

Even putting aside the part where you should have been able to figure it out yourself first: if a community did delete your content, what on Earth would make you think it's a good idea to just repost that content? Did it not occur to you that when people remove content, that's for a reason? I.e., that it is considered not suitable for the community, and that a new copy would therefore be judged the same way?

Look at my other approximately 100 posts in Stack Overflow, and you'll see that I have been using markdown like that for years with no one correcting me until now.

Thanks for the heads-up. Editing work is usually silent, and most things that should be edited don't get edited because there simply aren't nearly enough people editing. (Also because of the review process for lower-rep users.) If someone does fix such a problem in one of your previous questions, you won't be notified about it by default.

But it should be clear that the formatting described as "inline code formatting" shouldn't be used for technical jargon etc. - because that isn't code.

The way I have posted here now and in other Stack-Exchange forums bothers more of you here than almost everyone else who has been responding to my posts over the years in those other forums.

Again: Stack Overflow is not a discussion forum, and neither are other Stack Exchange sites. They aren't forums at all. They are... Stack Exchange. Like it says on the tour, we're different.

The way you "have posted" bothers us because it is blatantly against the most fundamental principles of how the site works, in ways that are clearly documented all over the place. It especially bothers me because I notice the reasons why you should know better.

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