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As someone who spends a lot of time answering questions in , I see a lot of questions from beginners both to coding and to Stack Overflow. This has led me to believe that the site does not do a good job onboarding new users onto the etiquette of the site, nor encourage users with specific ways to ask better questions. It is not uncommon for someone to immediately leave a comment on a question like: "you haven't said what isn't working", "idownvotedbecau.se/imageofcode", "Stack Overflow is not a coding service", etc. For example...

Question Problem
what-is-wrong-with-this-line-of-code-i-made-in-roblox-studio Image of code
why-is-my-script-not-working-not-a-local-script) Image of code, simply says "it just doesn't work"
how-am-i-supposed-to-save-a-value-that-changed-in-a-local-script-on-the-server No provided code
what-does-argument-1-missing-or-nil-mean There are 15 other questions that have a similar title
how-to-kick-all-players No description of the problem
roblox-setdescription-on-roblox-starter-character-code The original version of the post contained no code, and the linked image wasn't embedded

I think there are plenty of ways to handle each of these problems, in fact, I think the Similar Questions feature and the Community-Bot are a great start towards this goal. However, I would like to propose a way for the communities around tags to help improve the quality of questions as well. I believe that having community created, tag-specific validation rules can start weeding out bad questions before they are posted.

The way I imagine this would work would be similar to how Gmail lets you create rules for your inbox. Each tag would have a limit of, say, 5-10 validation rules. Users who have hit a certain amount of reputation would be allowed to create, edit, and propose changes to the rules. And once you have set up your question, and hit the Review Your Question button, it would cycle through the rules created for each tag on the question and evaluate if the question is up to the community standards. Some basic ones might include:

Rule Validation Response User Review Action
If the TITLE contains "why is * not working" "Please be more specific about exactly what isn't working" BLOCK QUESTION
If the BODY contains "https://i.stack.imgur.com/" "It looks like you've shared an image, please make sure that it is not an image of your code." Confirmation button that says "This is not code"
If the BODY contains "https://pastebin.com/" "Please paste your code inside the question, and not in a pastebin URL." BLOCK QUESTION
If the LENGTH(CODE_BLOCK) == 0 && USER_REPUTATION < 100 "You haven't shared any code, are you sure this question is On Topic?" Confirmation button that says "This is on topic"
If the (TITLE or BODY) contains [common error message] "There are %d similar questions, have you checked if any answer your question?" Confirmation button that says "Yes I have checked"
If the LENGTH(TEXT) < 10 && LENGTH(CODE_BLOCK) > 10 "Please explain what is happening in your code, and what isn't working" BLOCK QUESTION

While a few of my examples suggested blocking the question, the point is not to outright stop someone from asking their question, but rather to encourage the asker to address specific issues before it gets posted. I imagine that other communities around or or have all seen their fair share of low-quality questions and could come up with their own special filters to help keep the same questions from popping up, and this feature would allow the flexibility for each community to moderate that themselves.

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    I can only say, good luck for the staff to implement this... (to be clear, this might be a dream feature for curators, but we users and mods can't even change the system)
    – Andrew T.
    Apr 29, 2023 at 2:04
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    The logistics of providing a no-code UI suite that is selectively enabled and edited only for some users is surely a nightmare to implement. And all of that is even before we get to building validation systems to ensure that any single rule or set of rules don't cause the validator to spin forever too! But I do think that a community driven tool could have a lot of impact down the road..... assuming that the question asker bothers to read the warning boxes...
    – Kylaaa
    Apr 29, 2023 at 2:17
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    "the site does not do a good job onboarding new users onto the etiquette of the site, nor encourage users with specific ways to ask better questions" No kidding, alas. But SO Inc doesn't want to alienate users by informing them of the need to inform themselves or of the consequences of their ignorance--or by the long checklist of quality issues that they ought to confirm they have met--& the response is to (hope to) get curators to spoon-feed feedback as in the Staging Ground.
    – philipxy
    Apr 29, 2023 at 2:30
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    @philipxy, I can dare to dream of a world where we can automate the spoon-feeding!
    – Kylaaa
    Apr 29, 2023 at 2:35
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    Why is this question's title about tags when none of your suggestions have anything to do with tags?
    – starball
    May 2, 2023 at 0:20
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    @user, my suggestion is regarding tag-specific validation rules that are community created and driven. Perhaps I wasn't clear, but the idea was that different tags could have different validation rules. For example, the [Lua] tag might choose to block questions begging for help deobfuscating a block of code.
    – Kylaaa
    May 2, 2023 at 0:54
  • @Kylaaa begging for help de-obfuscating a block of code doesn't need a special tag-specific rule. It's lacking in focus, unless the block of obfuscated code is very well-scoped. And I'm still confused why your suggestions all seem to have nothing to do with particular tags. Not that that's a bad thing. It just doesn't seem to make sense given your title.
    – starball
    May 2, 2023 at 5:50
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    friendly reminder that both "idownvotedbecau.se/imageofcode"and "Stack Overflow is not a X" comments are flag-worthy. see meta.stackoverflow.com/a/385093/11107541 and meta.stackexchange.com/q/137795/997587.
    – starball
    May 2, 2023 at 7:55
  • "This has led me to believe that the site does not do a good job onboarding new users onto the etiquette of the site" - Well it doesn't really. Not yet. Small steps are taken towards it and the question wizard is such a small step, but it isn't the solution. Onboarding people would, in my opinion, start with not having the ability to immediately post questions. At least not for realsies. First you go through practice runs.
    – Gimby
    May 3, 2023 at 8:43
  • related to the point on onboarding: Introducing new user onboarding project, and Mithical's answer to What about the community is "toxic" to new users?
    – starball
    May 3, 2023 at 8:46

1 Answer 1

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If the TITLE contains "why is * not working" "Please be more specific about exactly what isn't working" BLOCK QUESTION

While I see the motivation, I don't think this works in general. I've seen good questions with titles of this form. The problems I've seen with titles of this form are general that they fail to provide enough or the right information about the context, but I'm not sure how easily solvable this is with just the asker's knowledge, since often it requires / helps a lot to know the answer to the question to know what contextual information is even relevant to the problem (for example, some contextual information may not be relevant, in which case the question can be more generalized)

If the BODY contains "https://i.stack.imgur.com/" "It looks like you've shared an image, please make sure that it is not an image of your code." Confirmation button that says "This is not code"

I'm worried about the possible number of false positives here. Add to this the fact that the image upload already has a message to this effect, so if people aren't reading that, I'm concerned about the effectiveness of adding another message after-the-fact. But if something like this is implemented and false positives are a problem, just narrow it down to questions that have no code blocks. For example, it's pretty easy to find recently-asked questions with images that should be text with this search query: is:q hascode:no url:"imgur.com" score:..1 closed:no created:3d.. (even more fun is to add "error" to that search query).

If the LENGTH(CODE_BLOCK) == 0 && USER_REPUTATION < 100 "You haven't shared any code, are you sure this question is On Topic?" Confirmation button that says "This is on topic"

Again, I'm concerned with the number of false positives. And this time I'm really concerned. Just take a look at the top-scored questions of all time. You'll see a good number of questions that have no code.

If the (TITLE or BODY) contains [common error message] "There are %d similar questions, have you checked if any answer your question?" Confirmation button that says "Yes I have checked"

This is redundant guidance. We already have a potential-duplicate-detection section of the Ask-Question UI. If that's not working or isn't of sufficiently good quality, then that's the problem to tackle.


Why is this question's title about tags when none of your suggestions have anything to do with tags?

You could really get some good mileage out of actually doing things with tags.

For example, with VS Code questions that have to do with understanding and changing unexpected behaviour, I often give the following request for more info:

Does this happen when you reload VS Code with extensions disabled (use the Developer: Reload With Extensions Disabled command in the command palette)? If not, then do an extension bisect to figure out what extension is causing it.

For certain CMake questions (not all, but some), it would be nice sometimes to know what version of CMake the asker has installed, and what they have in the configuration's cmake_minimum_required(VERSION ...) (because of the implications to what commands should or shouldn't be used in answers, or given warning labels about being incompatible with their current requirements).

It would even be nice just to be able to recommend search engine query techniques for doing research. For example, for a good number of questions I see about VS Code-related issues, existing discussion and issue tickets can be found in the top search results when googling with keywords like "github vscode issues".

I think we could learn a thing or two from how GitHub issue ticket templates work. Ex. Just take a gander at VS Code's issue ticket templates, for example, or the VS Code CMake Tools extension's. GitHub allows repo owners to create custom issue-ticket templates where you can create custom multiple-section inputs, or just use plain Markdown comments to instruct users on what information they should provide based on the type of problem they have.

In the end, this kind of comes back to tag wikis and getting people to read them. Ex. People don't read the tag excerpts because we don't swat them into their faces.

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