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Several times now I've asked a specific question about coding, only for comments to come back asking about the context - or worse, going directly to telling me outright that I'm approaching the problem the wrong way.

There are various reasons why I may have started down this avenue:

  • business reasons - my employer may have rules/conventions
  • compatibility with other business areas
  • integration with third-party applications
  • ease/legality of distribution

I work in a team of developers, most of whom are fairly highly qualified and very experienced, and I wouldn't ask on Stack Overflow unless we had held a discussion about it first.

On one occasion, I pointed out that I was working with a third-party application and was looking to write a wrapper around two or three git features which I could build into a plugin for said third-party application, only to be told not to bother because I'd be reinventing the wheel and that I should install an on-premises git server and instruct all users on how to use git instead.

If I were to explain the reasons behind this approach, then the carefully-worded, distilled-down question would contain far too much extraneous, distracting information.

Is it just me, or should it be sufficient to ask a question and not be lectured/patronised about why I might be asking the question?

And what is the best way of replying to such comments in a way which says "Look, I appreciate that you've taken the time to read my question, and that you want to help, but let me assure you that I have good reasons for choosing this approach."

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    There are a tremendous amount of users who are quite literally asking "how to shoot myself in the foot?", the foot being their data and the gun being exploits they are unknowingly building into their own code. If you know you're doing something nonstandard, just preface your question with that. It keeps some of the warnings away.
    – CodeCaster
    Apr 23, 2023 at 8:10
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    Let's have a mindset shift. Maybe the reason people are commenting (Rather than calling it "lectured/patronised") is because the question is not clear enough to them and they are trying to understand it. An XY Problem is something both the questioners and answerers probably want to avoid. Apr 23, 2023 at 8:10
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    I agree with both the above comments, and I have seen questions where someone has commented "Why don't you just do ... instead?" and the reply tends towards "Oh, I didn't think about that. Thanks." Yes. But what I'm asking is, what is a good way to cut people off before they advise this, and say "I know what you're thinking, but let me assure you that I have good reasons for asking this"?
    – awj
    Apr 23, 2023 at 8:14
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    I received a lot of those kinds of comments/advice myself (especially on Unix.SE). I think those are welcome on some level, but some user might take it the wrong way, or even think that it's "wasting time" and would prefer their question, even if the context they're using that for is perhaps questionable, to be answered. Apr 23, 2023 at 9:36
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    (cont 2): Given this is what usually happens (not always) to me when I ask things, I started honing the way I ask question. 1: Make it as out of context to my problem as possible, but still keep it in-context to what people expect is normal (in general consensus in programming). Doing this also help me further find solution by myself whenever I write out my problem on the "Ask New Question" page, at which point I do not need to ask anything at all, and close the tab. Apr 23, 2023 at 9:42
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    If/when you join a project half-way through, I bet you ask similar questions, even though you have direct access to all the docs, builds, requirements, designs, logs etc. The other skilled and experienced developers on SO are no different. Apr 23, 2023 at 9:48
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    What are some previous meta questions about this? I think they span all 15 years. Apr 23, 2023 at 10:36
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    @Peter well ironically the eight year old duplicate was asked by OP themself, so there's that...
    – CodeCaster
    Apr 23, 2023 at 11:01
  • "my employer may have rules/conventions" I actually find this one a terrible reason to do something that is considered bad practice. If your workplace does something that could be better, why are you and they endeavouring to make those same mistakes in the future, and why are you not trying to address those problems in the existing code base? If you're team don't know it's a problem, then you learning it is and then provided details of a better solution is great for you, your team, and your employee; it's a win, win, win.
    – Thom A
    Apr 23, 2023 at 11:16
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    I agree with you, but sometimes you cannot do anything in those situations. Just look on workplace.SE for example of people in IT/programming fields voicing similar concern about XYZ that they're asked to do, but know a better, less prone to failure way, but no one listen. I guess if it really turn out to be bad news, as in, either legally or concerning when it comes to privacy/health/etc then resigning is probably one of the only way forward @ThomA Apr 23, 2023 at 11:48
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    The right question to ask is "should I add context". Not "should I have to". Nobody is forced to increase their chances of success, it is merely a strong recommendation.
    – Gimby
    Apr 24, 2023 at 9:14

1 Answer 1

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If I were to explain the reasons behind this approach then the carefully-worded, distilled-down question would contain far too much extraneous, distracting information.

Yes, I think that for the purposes of long-term value and concision in the knowledge base we're building, it can be more useful in cases like you've described not to give a lengthy description of context. Sometimes we have reason to want to do things that appear strange to other experts.

However, I've encountered several questions where provided context of why the asker wants something uncovers a better way to achieve their goal (XY problem).

So I think it's up to you. If you think the question is clear without further background info, you can put your foot down and post it like that. Or if you're curious about the possibility that there's a better approach to solving your underlying problem / achieving your underlying goal, add more background info.

To someone new to a technology and new to Stack Overflow, though, providing a bit of context is usually a good step- especially for debugging problems- as long as it's not some autobiographical noise like "so I'm doing a programming course..." (unless that's somehow a necessary detail to understand the problem). Straight from "How to Ask":

Introduce the problem before you post any code

In the body of your question, start by expanding on the summary you put in the title. Don't just skip straight to the code! It is often helpful to provide some background contextual information, and describing your problem in words is almost as important as describing it with code.

And on the subject-matter-expert's side of things, it's more efficient for someone who can answer the question to remove from the question post what they know is not essential than for a subject-matter-expert to ask for clarification they think is necessary and wait for a response (which usually gets given in comments instead of an edit like it should be, which is then even more work to move it into the question post and flag the comment). There's a higher rate of question asking than answering, so I think there's a bit of logic in asking of a bit more writing effort of askers even if an answerer later deletes some of it for good reason.


On one occasion I pointed out that I was working with a third-party application and was looking to write a wrapper around two or three git features which I could build into a plugin for said third-party application, only to be told not to bother because I'm reinventing the wheel and that I should install an on-premises git server and instruct all users how to use git instead.

If explaining why certain workarounds to your problem can make your question more clear by describing what an answer shouldn't be, then such an explanation should be included.


And what is the best way of replying to such comments in a way which says "Look, I appreciate that you've taken the time to read my question, and that you want to help, but let me assure you that I have good reasons for choosing this approach."

As for dealing with comments, you could try to prevent them from coming in the first place by giving a short statement in your question post to the effect of- I know this may seem like a strange thing to want to do, but I have my reasons.

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    "I know this may seem like a strange thing to want to do, but I have my reasons" is not a useful thing to include, begging as it does the obvious question: "...what are they?"
    – jonrsharpe
    Apr 23, 2023 at 8:32
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    @jonrsharpe If the question is clear and on-topic as-is, the asker has no obligation to provide that info. If one really wanted to know, one could invite the asker to a chat room and see if the asker wants to engage in that kind of side-discussion. Apr 23, 2023 at 8:41
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    I didn't say they were. But either include the reasons or don't, don't say "I have reasons but I'm not saying what they are", especially when it might seem like a strange thing to do. People aren't obliged to answer, either, and without context doing so can seem like a waste of time.
    – jonrsharpe
    Apr 23, 2023 at 9:12
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    @jon "I know I'm doing something out of the ordinary, but because of undisclosed constraints I have to" is a perfectly valid remark. It preemptively answers "are you sure you want to do that?" with "yes".
    – CodeCaster
    Apr 23, 2023 at 9:31

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