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Someone is suggesting an edit to this question, Why Is that when i write "game" into my script it becomes red and doesn't make the script work how do i fix?, where they are transcribing the code in the linked image. I love that someone cares enough to help a new user improve their question, but these two answers already discuss that you should instead close a question that includes an image of code...

But there is no advice on how to reject suggested edits for a question like this. So I'm having a hard time figuring out what category this edit should be rejected under.

What category is appropriate when the choices are:

  • Spam or vandalism
  • No improvement
  • Clearly conflicts with the author's intent
  • Irrelevant tags
  • Attempt to reply
  • This edit causes harm

More specifically, since this edit is clearly an improvement to the question, how do I communicate to the editor that this isn't their job?

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    I tend to use "This edit causes harm" with a link to When should I make edits to code? (although either of the ones you've linked here would work just as well). I'm not sure the suggestors ever actually read the rejection reason, but it's there if they do. Commented Apr 7, 2023 at 17:15
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    That was what I was leaning towards too, but "this edit causes harm" seems like hyperbole when it's just a problem with etiquette.
    – Kylaaa
    Commented Apr 7, 2023 at 17:24
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    There's no shame in using skip Commented Apr 7, 2023 at 18:12
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    @ZoestandswithUkraine ignoring the edit leaves it in limbo for about a month though. It shouldn't be approved, and there's no good way to reject it either, so why is skipping it the correct path forward?
    – Kylaaa
    Commented Apr 7, 2023 at 18:18
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    @Kylaaa skipping the suggested edit leaves it in limbo where the post author could potentially come by and approve it as a valid transcription of their code.
    – Kevin B
    Commented Apr 7, 2023 at 18:22
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    @KevinB, oh yeah, I completely forgot that the authors can see edit suggestions as well. Thank you for the reminder.
    – Kylaaa
    Commented Apr 7, 2023 at 18:25
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    or left to be rejected by other users who have a clearer idea of what to do. That's generally the idea behind skipping; leaving it for someone with a better idea of what to do. Unfortunately, because bad reviewers, that can backfire and result in an inappropriate approval (or inappropriate rejection, but that's significantly rarer). But that's also a bigger problem than the edit pending for a while. An edit pending isn't really a problem. We're not inherently in a rush to complete anything. Quality over quantity, etc. Commented Apr 7, 2023 at 18:29
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    While I'm at it: "but "this edit causes harm" seems like hyperbole when it's just a problem with etiquette" - if you want my advice, don't worry about the wording. Review queues have several problems with wording. "causes harm" is functionally equivalent to "other"; it has no other impact, and doesn't count any differently against a user than a "no improvement" or another rejection reason (except spam or vandalism, for obvious reasons; it feeds into the built-in spam protection systems). It's the only way to enter a reason, so just pretend it says "something else". Or don't and skip Commented Apr 7, 2023 at 18:33
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    @ZoestandswithUkraine, I don't love the idea of "wait for someone who better knows what to do" as an answer to a question about what to do in a circumstance. But thank you for explaining more in depth and that makes sense. Those points would make for a valuable answer if you want to add it.
    – Kylaaa
    Commented Apr 7, 2023 at 18:40
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    @ZoestandswithUkraine Skipping is wrong, it's a bad edit.
    – philipxy
    Commented Apr 8, 2023 at 1:03
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    @philipxy Skipping is never wrong. If that's your take on reviews, honestly, you shouldn't be doing any. Skipping happens regularly, and there's nothing wrong with doing so. It doesn't contribute to it's approval, and there's no shame in not knowing how to handle an edit, be that as a result of not understanding policy, or as is the case here, not being sure how to enact a policy in practice. Or anything else for that matter. Saying skipping is wrong is outright counterproductive and bordering damaging Commented Apr 8, 2023 at 1:13
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    @ZoestandswithUkraine The "wrong" of my "skipping is wrong" is not the "wrong" of "skipping is never wrong". Not flagging spam or abuse is wrong, it should be flagged, not flagging leaves the site worse off, but it's not wrong to do nothing, one is never forced to act. So: Skipping in the case of the question & in the case of spam/abuse is the "wrong" way to be most effective/beneficial.
    – philipxy
    Commented Apr 8, 2023 at 7:55
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    Can't we just... add a reason for this? Since it's backed by established policy? Commented Apr 8, 2023 at 10:13
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    @KarlKnechtel If we added a custom skip/close/whatever reason for every policy, there would be literally hundreds of reasons in the dialog and nobody would ever use it. We already have far too many questions like this one where curators are paralyzed by choice - what is truly needed are fewer skip/close/whatever reasons, not more, especially considering the curation burden and the fact that the vast majority of question askers and editors honestly do not care why their question was nuked or edit rejected.
    – Ian Kemp
    Commented Apr 8, 2023 at 21:09

3 Answers 3

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Though I agree with many of Makoto's points about using the rejection reasons given by the review system, I do disagree with some of them.

Having code someone can copy into their own IDE or search on the site is a vast improvement over an image.

Yes, this is true; however, transcribing code you have no way of validating is not helpful. This could easily result in the error or behaviour being not reproducible. Better to leave the question with an (unhelpful) image of code than useable code that doesn't actually give the correct behaviour; that could lead to wrong answers rather than closure.

I cover in another answer that has been linked, already in the question as well, about how much time it would take to validate such code and that really shouldn't be expected of a viewer. Much of my reasoning for rejecting is all covered in that answer so I'm not going to recover that ground.

In effect, no amount of time you take will be able to ensure that the transcribed code is correct, so there is no point in doing so. Like Khelwood stated:

reject with a custom reason something like "Please don't transcribe other people's code into the question."

This is, in my opinion, your best option other than skip, within the review. If the question is still open, then visiting it to provide a close-vote is likely also a good idea.

If you wish you could also link to one of the posts over here on Meta in your rejection reason; the user might not read it, but if they get enough hopefully they will.

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  • A few Typos: "point[d=s]" + "with a[+n] (unhelpful) image" + "to provide a close vote[-r]" (+ "to provide" = "to cast" maybe?) + I don't understand the "but if they get enough" => enough what?. // + Could link directly to that other Answer of yours you are referring to (like Makoto does in their Answer), without having to scan through 2 long Threads containing 6+3=9 Answers to find out what Post/Answer you mean... :idea:
    – chivracq
    Commented Apr 8, 2023 at 10:36
  • Thanks for adding your thoughts @ThomA. Just to be clear, how do you reject with a custom reason? Is it under the "this causes harm" reason?
    – Kylaaa
    Commented Apr 8, 2023 at 10:37
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    Use the "This edit causes harm: Describe how this edit would make the post worse." reason, @Kylaaa . This allows you to provide a "custom" reason. I admit "harm" feels like the wrong word, but then as the edit can't be validated you could says that it had the potential to.
    – Thom A
    Commented Apr 8, 2023 at 10:43
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    Awkward phrasing like "causes harm" seems like it comes from a particular political leaning, the same one that leads to describing disrespect, trolling, belligerent statement of disagreement etc. as a "safety" issue. Commented Apr 8, 2023 at 21:15
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    I forcefully disagree. You're talking about taking what was in a picture and making sure you copied the same thing down. You're not asking an editor to also be a SME and validate the code in the picture. That's unreasonable.
    – Makoto
    Commented Apr 8, 2023 at 22:32
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    @Makoto You can't necessarily validate that the code is exactly the same as in the picture, though. White space matters in some languages, for example. Plus, most of the people reading the question will probably be people who know the language in question and may end up fixing (or at least changing) the problem in the code inadvertently when transcribing it. Especially simple stuff like adding a missing semi-colon would be easy to do accidentally when transcribing, just as an example.
    – reirab
    Commented Apr 9, 2023 at 0:07
  • @KarlKnechtel I don't really agree. I think the intention of 'harm' there is to mean harming the question/answer (i.e. reducing its quality rather than improving it,) not actually causing harm to people (e.g. disrespect, belligerence, etc.)
    – reirab
    Commented Apr 9, 2023 at 0:10
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    @reirab: There really isn't anything here to suggest - in the slightest - that in this specific edit, that whitespace or other characters are a factor. This is why I said for this edit it's tough to reject because, well, there's nothing actually wrong with the transcription. But again, this is from the view of a reviewer in the queues, who's trying to determine if an edit was good or bad. Objectively, there's nothing wrong with the edit. Subjectively, there's everything wrong with what led up to the edit. But the subjective part is not what is being asked about here.
    – Makoto
    Commented Apr 9, 2023 at 2:47
  • @Makoto Ah, yeah, that may be true for this particular edit. I was just responding to your comment above which didn't seem to me to suggest that it was referring to this particular edit vs. transcribing images of code in general. Basing an edit reject reason around being able to understand code doesn't seem like it would work in the general case, though.
    – reirab
    Commented Apr 9, 2023 at 3:21
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    And I "forcefully" disagree that you can transcribe accurately text, @Makoto , when you can't tell see the characters or tell what they are. You could, as an example, incorrectly use tabs/spaces in python making/removing errors. If you have some way to identifier these characters from images, then you should share that in your answer.
    – Thom A
    Commented Apr 9, 2023 at 7:56
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    @ThomA And given Unicode is full of characters that look (almost) the same, it is also easy to "fix" the error by replacing the incorrect character with the right character. For example U+003B (;) vs U+037E (;) Commented Apr 9, 2023 at 9:23
  • Yes, there's a multitude of examples as to why you can't validate the transcription, which only solidifies my point of why you 1. Shouldn't attempt to transcribe images 2. Shouldn't approve edits that do attempt to transcribe them.
    – Thom A
    Commented Apr 9, 2023 at 12:21
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So I was referenced in one of your examples on closing a question, but what this answer touches on is what to do when editing as well. But it only touches on it lightly.

I'll offer my opinion: edits that replace an image with code are susceptible to copy errors. That is to say, by adding code you could be introducing a different problem than the OP had originally intended to convey. This is why closure is often a better resolution for the question overall.

When it comes to rejecting the edit...I think the line is a bit more blurry. Notice that rejecting this edit doesn't fit any of these categories very cleanly.

  • Spam or vandalism
    • If the picture and the edit are 1 to 1 match, then this couldn't be construed as vandalism.
  • No improvement
    • Having code someone can copy into their own IDE or search on the site is a vast improvement over an image.
  • Clearly conflicts with the author's intent
    • Clearly, the author intended to post about their code.
  • Irrelevant tags
    • No tags were influenced in the modification of this post.
  • Attempt to reply
    • You introduced no editorials or opinions into the edit.
  • This edit causes harm
    • Again, if the picture and the edit are a 1 to 1 match, then there could be no harm otherwise to the question.

So personally, I'd have a tough time rejecting the edit. It's not like you're translating it from a different language to English, and any reviewer could* look back at the image for reference and determine if the action taken was correct.

*: Provided that the reviewer spends more than 30 seconds looking at it. This is not a guarantee even on the slowest of work days.

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    Thank you for weighing in, I appreciated that your original answer recognized the effort that went into making the edit. But since there is clearly no good way to reject an edit like this, perhaps a more accurate question I should ask is, "how do I communicate to the editor that this isn't their job"?
    – Kylaaa
    Commented Apr 7, 2023 at 17:42
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    You really can't take action here since - even though it's not something that's exactly ideal to do - that is, editing a question with a picture in it - the edit isn't the sin here. But, telling the editor that "this is bad" conveys that the edit was bad, and I'm scratching my head trying to figure out why it's a bad edit besides policy. I personally wouldn't bother too much with this one since - even though it's not ideal, the edit itself is not harmful and would not fit one of the categories for rejection. (Yes, I know it was rejected. It probably shouldn't have been.)
    – Makoto
    Commented Apr 7, 2023 at 17:48
  • That makes a lot of sense.
    – Kylaaa
    Commented Apr 7, 2023 at 17:50
  • I wouldn’t have any problems rejecting the edit. The question can have both the code and the inline screenshot. But in this case the question was caused by a typo. Commented Apr 7, 2023 at 17:57
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    @SecurityHound, that still doesn't answer how to reject the edit. And this question is meant to address process, not the referenced question specifically.
    – Kylaaa
    Commented Apr 7, 2023 at 18:00
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    Imho, reject with a custom reason something like "Please don't transcribe other people's code into the question."
    – khelwood
    Commented Apr 7, 2023 at 19:24
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    @Kylaaa - I would have selected "no improvement" because the question is clear enough to answer without an edit, and transcribing code but not including the inline screenshot is a noticeable degradation to the quality of the question. Commented Apr 7, 2023 at 19:59
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    @SecurityHound: You and I both know that people will instinctively close a question on site just because they provide a link to a picture because it doesn't have all the details in the question (because "wHaT If tHe iMaGe iS GoNe"). So if nothing else, pacifying that knee-jerk closure reason is a pretty big improvement.
    – Makoto
    Commented Apr 7, 2023 at 20:11
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    @khelwood: This is only really a problem if someone does a poor job of transcribing. If the transcription is done well (and you can validate that it was), then there's really...no reason to reject the edit for that reason.
    – Makoto
    Commented Apr 7, 2023 at 20:12
  • @Makoto - Which is the reason I would have included both the text and the image. Because the image explained the red text while the text would have satisfied those individuals. I would agree that an error in transcribing the code isn’t a huge concern. Commented Apr 7, 2023 at 20:18
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    @Makoto you can't validate it was though, that is the problem. Only the OP can do that.
    – Thom A
    Commented Apr 8, 2023 at 8:20
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    @ThomA: In this context I am not talking about mechanical validation; that is, you can't validate that the code works. That's also not what's being asked of any editor. I'm talking about making sure that what you transcribe is the same as what the picture had. This doesn't have to be any harder than that.
    – Makoto
    Commented Apr 8, 2023 at 22:30
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    And again, you can't, @Makoto . How do you transcribe a non breaking space from an image when you can't see it?
    – Thom A
    Commented Apr 9, 2023 at 7:52
  • @ThomA, realistically, how often does that happen?
    – Kylaaa
    Commented Apr 9, 2023 at 20:50
  • More often than I would like, if I am honest, @Kylaaa .
    – Thom A
    Commented Apr 9, 2023 at 21:09
-5

More specifically, since this edit is clearly an improvement to the question, how do I communicate to the editor that this isn't their job?

The list of reject reasons, or close reasons, or any reasons is not intended to be exhaustive nor absolute, but a general representation of commonly-encountered issues in the interest of avoiding the need to raise a custom moderator flag, thereby allowing flags to be processed more quickly.

So, just pick the reason that you believe is most appropriate. Since very few robo-editors care about why their edits are rejected, it almost certainly doesn't matter what reason you choose, anyway. Most important is to stop the robo-reviewer from continuing to "help" in this manner.

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  • I'm unfamiliar with the term you use, so I'm assuming that when you say "robo-reviewer" that you are referring to a bot that auto-transcribes images? I'm specifically talking about communicating with flesh and blood individuals that are doing their good deed for the day, but do not understand the policy around edits. I didn't know until someone told me ages ago, so I'd like to be able to educate others similarly. If that's not what you meant, could you explain it to me?
    – Kylaaa
    Commented Apr 8, 2023 at 23:25
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    There is no appropriate reason to use with this edit. I explain this in detail in my answer. The edit is not the sin, so the editor shouldn't be punished for their deeds on this. But hey, I could be convinced; if there's an actual problem with the edit, I'd want to know.
    – Makoto
    Commented Apr 9, 2023 at 2:56
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    @Kylaaa Not exactly. "robo-reviewer" means a real person who reviews very fast and without much thought. Rather than thinking stuff through like a real person and helping improve both the post and the editor, they act like a robot and just go on an "approve" or "reject" speedrun (hence, "robo-"). Likewise, "robo-editors" are people who just submit a ton of mostly trivial edits without giving it much thought, usually for the rep.
    – Michael M.
    Commented Apr 9, 2023 at 12:21
  • O, common sense in profile description. They won't believe me. Commented Apr 20, 2023 at 13:18

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