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First, let me say that I'm not concerned about losing 10 points and I'm not asking that this be reversed:

Should I be concerned about reversal statements on my profile?

No, not at all. It's only an indication of reputation change. After all, we can't control the actions of other users. It's very rare where we'd run across a user who was committing the voting fraud themselves on their own account, and if we believe you're doing that, you will have already been warned separately or suspended. In no way should you be concerned with reversal statements in yours or anyone else's reputation history.

I almost ignored the notification, but the number of points caught my eye and I'm a little confused:

To the best of knowledge, the only way someone else can give you 10 points is by voting on one of your posts. I don't think there are any smaller denominations (at least since the The Great Reputation Re-Recalc of 2019)

So here's my question:

How does one vote count as "serial"?

I tried to think of possible scenarios where someone might vote "serially" but only one of my posts would be affected. I could only come up with two, both of which seem unlikely:

  • Someone engaged in an aggressive campaign of upvoting many random posts by different authors (e.g. all of the answers on a question with many, many answers).

    However, that doesn't fit my current understanding of "serial voting": "a single user continually upvotes or downvotes many of your posts within a short period of time". I don't see how voting on random posts would benefit either the voter or the author. It seems like the scheme of someone trying to create a bot, but in that case I would have expected "User was removed" as the reason.

  • An employee is working through a long backlog of flagged behavior and there's some kind of "statute of limitations" at play.

    Perhaps I was the unwitting recipient of someone's naive gratitude, but all but one post was too old to undo? However, in order to count as "serial", votes must be cast within a short period of time. Even if there was a statute of limitations, it seems unlikely that only one of my posts met the cutoff requirement.

Is there a bug in the bot?

The only other scenario I could think of was that the automated system misbehaved.

Perhaps the bot was too broad? Maybe someone engaged in some serial voting toward another author one day and, while I was the recipient of only one vote, all votes from that day were reversed.

Or perhaps the bot miscalculated points? Maybe I was, after all, the recipient of serial upvotes, but the bot incorrectly deducted 10 points when it should have deducted more?

TL;DR

Did I miss a policy which targets "serial voting" of a different flavor (users who cast many votes for many authors, but too quickly?). Or is this by design/a bug in the way that points are calculated?

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  • 9
    Often, serial voters will try to hide their voting by voting on other people's posts within the same "voting spree".
    – Kevin B
    Feb 14, 2023 at 18:12
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    "How does one vote count as "serial"?" - because a large number of users were targeted. Can't disclose all the details because Reasons:tm:, but there's a greater pattern extending far beyond your account
    – Zoe is on strike Mod
    Feb 14, 2023 at 18:12
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    Usually when this happens, a user who commited voting fraud was destroyed. Some of these users also vote on random other posts to hide their targeted voting.
    – BDL
    Feb 14, 2023 at 18:13
  • @ZoestandswithUkraine - Ah, so all votes within the serial voting time period are reversed? I assumed just the ones targeting the other account were reversed.
    – JDB
    Feb 14, 2023 at 18:15
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    @BDL - Wouldn't that be categorized as "User was removed"? I've gotten plenty of those before.
    – JDB
    Feb 14, 2023 at 18:16
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    Essentially, yes. It's complicated by the user's voting pattern (targeting quite a few people), and after a couple rounds of playing whack-a-mole, it was decided that the whole lot would be wiped. FWIW, a complete wipe was a last resort, but the voting pattern became convoluted to the point where there weren't a whole lot of feasible options left. There are a lot more details to this, but they're not really important, and they're need-to-know
    – Zoe is on strike Mod
    Feb 14, 2023 at 18:22
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    @ZoestandswithUkraine - Totally understand and respect that. Thanks for the answer.
    – JDB
    Feb 14, 2023 at 18:24

1 Answer 1

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Zoe stands with Ukraine answered in the comments, so I'll tack this on for the sake of completeness:

"How does one vote count as "serial"?" - because a large number of users were targeted. Can't disclose all the details because Reasons:tm:, but there's a greater pattern extending far beyond your account

@ZoestandswithUkraine - Ah, so all votes within the serial voting time period are reversed? I assumed just the ones targeting the other account were reversed. – JDB

Essentially, yes. It's complicated by the user's voting pattern (targeting quite a few people), and after a couple rounds of playing whack-a-mole, it was decided that the whole lot would be wiped. FWIW, a complete wipe was a last resort, but the voting pattern became convoluted to the point where there weren't a whole lot of feasible options left. There are a lot more details to this, but they're not really important, and they're need-to-know

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