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The Collectives product is moving into a new stage of iteration and development. This post and the companion posts linked below are meant to offer a holistic view of Collectives, why it’s a focus for Stack Overflow, and how we’ll be working closely with the community on how it will keep evolving.

I’ll start by presenting the updated definition of Collectives on Stack Overflow:

Collectives™ on Stack Overflow are dedicated spaces where developers can find content that's organized around an area of technical practice or a technology provider's product suite. Defined by tags, a collective brings developers together to collaborate and learn from one another, as well as connect with subject matter experts from the community and the organizations that help build or maintain a technology product/service. Content includes questions and answers, as well as technical articles authored by Members of a collective, and Bulletins – timely, useful, and relevant updates published by Admins of a collective.

Collective Admins can also grant users specific permissions, such as posting and approving Articles within a collective, recommending answers that are associated with a collective, and having a user badge that highlights their role within the collective.

This update reflects that collectives are focused on an area of practice. The ones launched up to this point have been provider-specific collectives, focused on areas of practice defined by a provider’s suite of products.

In the coming weeks, we'll begin expanding Collectives into new areas of practice that aren't provider-specific. We expect these new collectives to soon become the typical experience of Collectives on Stack Overflow, with the community taking the lead in terms of defining each collective’s processes and curating the content.

These new collectives will look much the same as the collectives you see today, in terms of function and structure. We’ll be reaching out to subject matter experts in the community (based on their contributions in the topic areas) to form the initial groups that will help establish each collective. These groups will draft the initial set of processes around answer recommendation and article development.

There will be two new collectives initially launching, focused on:

We expect to launch these at the end of February or beginning of March, and will begin reaching out to potential community collaborators this week.

We recognize that the community will have many questions, and we’ve got lots of information. This post is being published concurrently with some supporting posts that focus on various aspects of collectives and their place on Stack Overflow and on the Stack Exchange network.

If you’ve got questions or comments focused in one of those areas, please read the respective post and then add your thoughts on that page. If you have any general questions or comments that don’t fit any of the other posts, you can share that feedback below this post.

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    Collectives do none of these things.
    – Kevin B
    Commented Feb 1, 2023 at 19:37
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    CI/CD - this sounds like a magnet for off-topic content that belongs on devops.stackexchange.com
    – Dalija Prasnikar Mod
    Commented Feb 1, 2023 at 19:45
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    Sorry, but the title requires it. The collective will add your biological and technological distinctiveness to our own. Your culture will adapt to service us. Resistance is futile. Commented Feb 1, 2023 at 20:08
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    @user4581301 I'm so pleased that someone enjoyed the subtle reference. I'd probably lean more toward Federation comparisons but with the product name, I can't blame ya for going Borg.
    – Berthold StaffMod
    Commented Feb 1, 2023 at 20:16
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    I'd be curious to know why Intel decided to dump their collective? Commented Feb 2, 2023 at 2:03
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    I thought collectives were sponsored. Is there a specific CI/CI provider sponsoring the CI/CD collective? Commented Feb 2, 2023 at 5:10
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    All I want to know is: Can I safely ignore this or will I be bothered as a contributer in the r tag? I'm not interested in the product at all.
    – Roland
    Commented Feb 2, 2023 at 7:48
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    @Lundin I don't really see how that is problematic when the collective is about "CI/CD", not just "CD". The pairing is not ambiguous. I can hardly find a programming job today without that being at the top of the buzzword bingo bullet list.
    – Gimby
    Commented Feb 2, 2023 at 10:21
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    @Lundin "I haven't heard of that before" is not the same as "it is a newly invented term that people won't understand". As a quick example, here's an article about Github Actions launching in 2018, talking about how it goes beyond CI/CD, showing that the term was already well established. I'm sure there are plenty of terms that would crop on, say, a mechanical engineering site that would be baffling to me, but that doesn't mean they're a bad choice of term for their target audience.
    – IMSoP
    Commented Feb 2, 2023 at 14:18
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    @Lundin The CD abbreviation was probably invented 5 minutes after the first Hudson release (the predecessor of Jenkins), so roughly 2005. Wikipedia says the term became popular from a 2010 book. I'd also argue it's the most frequent use of the abbreviation by far in a sw context as collision detection is way more niche and CDs barely exist anymore outside of music releases. (And yes, many people and orgs are doing agile wrong, but that's not so much an issue with the specific methodology as most of them would probably screw up waterfall / other paradigms even harder...)
    – l4mpi
    Commented Feb 2, 2023 at 15:52
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    @Lundin re explaining CD, it's hard to create a definition everyone agrees with as it means different things to different people (the same way "testing" or "releasing" have a different meaning in different projects). But let's try: CD means you have an automated process (optionally with manual steps) that is started (auto or manually) after a new commit (or branch) is pushed to your repo, which performs tests / validation / other steps , builds a release, and (auto or manually) deploys it to a target system (can be production or test, personally I'd assume prod if you say CD).
    – l4mpi
    Commented Feb 2, 2023 at 16:05
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    @HolyBlackCat These next collectives will not be sponsored initially and the sponsorship model is different from the collectives launched thus far. There is more detail in this post. It seems likely that a CI/CD provider would be one eventual sponsor, but they would not have a management role in the collective (nor would any other sponsor). We expect this arrangement to be the more common one for collectives in the long term.
    – Berthold StaffMod
    Commented Feb 2, 2023 at 17:51
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    @Roland I'll make sure we don't reach out to you for doing pre-launch collaboration. I do hope that you'll join the R collective when it launches though, to at least check out the experience.
    – Berthold StaffMod
    Commented Feb 2, 2023 at 17:53
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    Writing as a long-term contributor to Stack Overflow to your management, I am sorry to say I just don't see the point of your Collectives. I don't see how Collectives help me or the people with whom I interact. (I mostly answer questions.) That makes me a little sad, because I think it's wonderful that you routinely try new things to improve both the quality of the site and your business prospects. Don't stop trying new things! And, maybe refine your Collectives pitch to focus on their benefits.
    – O. Jones
    Commented Feb 5, 2023 at 18:17
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    What is/are the metric(s) to determine that Collectives will be working going forward, and not just "working" but "working better than the use of tags we already have"? Looking at what happened with the current iteration (where even GitLab didn't see the value and shuttered their collective) I would imagine the conclusion to have been "this is quite clearly not offering anything appreciable for our users, we should discontinue this" rather than "this isn't working, we should double down". Commented Feb 7, 2023 at 17:11

2 Answers 2

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In the spirit of healthy skepticism (as opposed to, say, general grumpiness), I want to suggest that the Collective idea doesn't add value to the average user. From your definition above, taken piece by piece:

Collectives™ on Stack Overflow are (1) dedicated spaces where developers can find content that's organized around an area of technical practice or a technology provider's product suite.

We already have that! It's called Stack Overflow questions. It's wonderfully organized using tags. Users have long managed asking about technology provider's product suite through using multiple appropriate tags on questions, an excellent feature that you added a long time ago. Users haven't been clamoring for a "tag grouping" feature so far (closest I could quickly find is this, with a few dupes over the years), and that's a good clue that it's not a pressing user need.

Defined by tags, a collective brings developers together to collaborate and learn from one another, as well as connect with subject matter experts from the community and the organizations that help build or maintain a technology product/service.

We already do this too! Heck, the whole site is meant for learning from each other and connecting with community SMEs. We even have tooling to identify top SMEs in the community. Perhaps you don't appreciate it, but this approach is far better than the "let the organization define their own SMEs" approach. We've all been on that tech support call where the supposed "expert" doesn't know as much as we do. These folks have answered thousands of questions and have proven their knowledge in a visible, verifiable way. Definitely not obvious to me what Collectives add here.

Content includes questions and answers, as well as technical articles authored by Members of a collective, and Bulletins – timely, useful, and relevant updates published by Admins of a collective.

We already have Q & A, so that's not new. I'm a bit confused why companies would want to host technical articles on Stack Overflow. Firstly, every company currently listed here already has multiple blogs where they communicate both technical articles and relevant updates to their customers. Secondly, Stack Overflow users have proven pretty resistant to using SO for content beyond the Q&A component. Chat is used by a tiny subset of users and Docs didn't get traction beyond the initial exploration. Heck, even Meta is ignored by most users. It doesn't seem that users are looking for additional content from anyone, and that includes an effectively random subset of large tech companies.


I do understand the monetization intent, I'm just not clear why users would follow you here. I would appreciate a clearer value proposition for the users.

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    I would like to see collectives as an opportunity to verify that the SO user is an employee of the company and therefore can voice the official opinion of the company on a particular technology or question that relates to the company aka collective. Collectives gathered around one technology rather than a company are no different from the tags (already in place).
    – kirogasa
    Commented Feb 7, 2023 at 10:02
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    @kirogasa - I cannot see any company choosing a non-company platform to make official statements. I particularly cannot see them using Stack Overflow, where the TOS explicitly state that SE claims ownership of any content posted to the site.
    – eykanal
    Commented Feb 7, 2023 at 16:38
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    I see a lot of spam-adjacent answers from people associated with a software platform that either a) just reroute people to the company support site, then get deleted as link-only, or b) provide just enough of an answer to not get deleted while rerouting people to the company support site. At least some companies see value in that
    – camille
    Commented Feb 11, 2023 at 15:41
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    This post is probably exactly why Intel is no longer a collective.
    – Blue
    Commented Feb 11, 2023 at 21:41
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    @eykanal - I think your point is valid... companies will probably end up posting a short blurb with a hyperlink to the real announcement. However, your statement is a mischaracterization. The text actually says, "All materials ... are the property of Stack Overflow and/or third parties", then goes on to say, "You agree that any and all content ... is perpetually and irrevocably licensed to Stack Overflow". If SO thought they owned the content, they wouldn't need to require a license for it.
    – JDB
    Commented Feb 15, 2023 at 19:56
  • @JDB - Very good nuance, you're right. The general point that most companies don't want to provide SO with a "irrevocable, perpetual, royalty-free, bla bla bla license" to their stuff still stands.
    – eykanal
    Commented Feb 16, 2023 at 21:55
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    "Users haven't been clamoring for a "tag grouping" feature so far" I would absolutely love if I didn't constantly hit roadbumps in curation simply because a question was tagged [tag:python-3.x] but not [tag:python]. Commented Mar 2, 2023 at 6:19
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    "Perhaps you don't appreciate it, but this approach is far better than the "let the organization define their own SMEs" approach." I don't think I agree. Willingness to do homework and pick up quick +25s for an OP upvote and accept != expertise. This also prioritizes having been around for longer, and especially the luck of the draw on old questions that might by now be thoroughly outdated. Commented Mar 2, 2023 at 6:32
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Congratulations - you reinvented tags, but... not.

How is this different from tags, again?

All the questions about R-language libraries should already have the tag.

And the CI/CD tags should just be merged into one tag, which should then be burninated.

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    The difference, as far as I can tell, is that the top users of a tag are determined by the community (via upvotes and downvotes), whereas the "notable users" of a collective are determined by a small group of appointed experts, which seems (at least to me) contrary to the meritocratic foundations Stack Overflow has always prided itself on. Commented Feb 7, 2023 at 18:59
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    @SilvioMayolo FYI, there is no such thing as a meritocracy - unless you redefine "merit". Stack Overflow reputation is based on time active, and amount of gaming the system. Commented Feb 9, 2023 at 8:27
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    @user253751 - Hardly, there are plenty of users that have been here as long as Jon Skeet but have nowhere near his amount of rep. Sure, the longer you're here the more rep you'll have as long as you're not a complete idiot, but you still need to contribute valuably and consistently to get to high amounts of rep Commented Feb 10, 2023 at 16:30
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    @ScottishTapWater one of the best ways to get rep is answering noob questions and it's actually quite controversial because they could be closed as duplicates (which the asker will quite likely not understand) instead Commented Feb 10, 2023 at 16:32
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    @ScottishTapWater it's certainly possible to earn massive amounts of rep without contributing valuably.
    – Kevin B
    Commented Feb 10, 2023 at 16:34
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    If the asker won't understand the answer in the linked dupe then I'd argue it's not a dupe because it's not answering the asker's question in a fashion that they can understand Commented Feb 10, 2023 at 16:34
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    @ScottishTapWater sometimes that's true, but I'd guess from my experience it's more often they don't really try to adapt. Hence people disagreeing whether it's a dupe because one post calculates a mean and one calculates a minimum, or one subsets 2 rows of a data frame and one subsets 1, or expecting dupes to use exactly the same regex pattern
    – camille
    Commented Feb 12, 2023 at 17:57

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