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Someone is removing meta commentary in my question that points out that answers to the question are version specific. I think this meta commentary is actually important to the understanding the answers, and that without it people might make assumptions about what will or won't work for their version.

I feel, in fact, that the question is pointless without the meta-commentary, and I would rather simply remove the question. I also think that rigidly applied rules are generally a bad idea and mostly an excuse for bureaucratic minds to feel they're doing something useful by enforcing them.

Should I remove the question to end the edit war?

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    You cannot remove the question. Does that help make up your mind?
    – VLAZ
    Commented Jan 26, 2023 at 14:13
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    @VLAZ - No, it doesn't. Commented Jan 26, 2023 at 14:14
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    " meta commentary in my question that points out that answers to the question are version specific" I must be misunderstanding this. Answers being version specific is not relevant? How is it meta commentary?
    – Suraj Rao
    Commented Jan 26, 2023 at 14:16
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    FWIW, I think the information is useful, but it probably makes more sense in the answer. It's certainly not part of your question as it doesn't help to define the problem. Is there a reason that "This solution is for python < 3.9" couldn't go at the top of the answer?
    – Henry Ecker Mod
    Commented Jan 26, 2023 at 14:17
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    Which question are we talking about?
    – BDL
    Commented Jan 26, 2023 at 14:20
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    @HenryEcker - I suppose every answer could be edited to specify which version of Python it's applicable to. Part of the problem is to make sure all of the answers are understood in context. A part of the context of the question was that it was asked before a feature specifically supporting the desired functionality was added to Python. Commented Jan 26, 2023 at 14:20
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    I assume this is the question In Python argparse, is it possible to have paired --no-something/--something arguments? The part that was removed was not part of the question. It was a comment about the accepted answer.
    – Dharman Mod
    Commented Jan 26, 2023 at 14:20
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    Edit the answers instead! The question is for stating the issue, not for giving commentary on existing answers. The accepted answer can be changed at any time, and questions are expected for long-term use regardless if there's now in-built function that solves the old problem.
    – Andrew T.
    Commented Jan 26, 2023 at 14:22
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    @AndrewT. - If the person who edited the question had also simultaneously edited every single answer to include the Python version the answer was applicable to at the beginning of the answer, then I might think more highly of the edit and the editor. Commented Jan 26, 2023 at 14:28
  • @Omnifarious other than the answer that uses BooleanOptionalAction (which already mentions it is a feature introduced in version 3.9) the other answers probably still apply. I could edit them and say that there's a better answer for version 3.9+ but I am not sure if that would not be considered rude by the answers authors (Since that is redirecting people to other answers than theirs). Commented Jan 26, 2023 at 16:58

3 Answers 3

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Someone is removing meta commentary in my question that points out that answers to the question are version specific. I think this meta commentary is actually important to the understanding the answers, and that without it people might make assumptions about what will or won't work for their version.

This sounds like useful information! But it's useful information about the answers, not about the question. You should not be putting information about the answers in the question: the answers might change, new ones might be added, old ones might be removed, they might be rearranged, etc. Instead, edit the answers to add any relevant qualifications about which versions they apply to.

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You should never delete a post to end an edit war!

If you and another user cannot agree on the edit, you can flag for moderator attention. In fact, after few rollbacks, moderators are informed automatically. A mod will review changes and either rollback, make an edit of their own, or keep the current version of the post. A mod will usually lock the post to stop the war and indicate which version should be kept.

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    Stack Overflow is not a do-what-you-want platform. It is heavily moderated by the community. This is what makes it great. I don't see why this little change to your question would make the site worse. Actually I think it makes the question easier to read.
    – Dharman Mod
    Commented Jan 26, 2023 at 14:28
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    You can use tags to restrict the question to a specific Python version. Otherwise, each answer should specify the limitations, e.g. This answer applies only to Python 3.8. It's not the job of the question to do it.
    – Dharman Mod
    Commented Jan 26, 2023 at 14:32
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    You can edit closed questions. In fact, you're supposed to do that, and then they can be reopened (providing the edit addresses the close reason). You're not supposed to circumvent the close/reopen system by just reposting the same question "with slightly different framing or wording".
    – F1Krazy
    Commented Jan 26, 2023 at 14:58
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    "people enforcing tiny little rules (most of which should be guidelines) that do little to improve the site, and often make it less useful." If you believe this to be the case, please feel free to make meta posts that discuss individual rules, and detail why you believe they are counterproductive. Commented Jan 26, 2023 at 14:59
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    "I gave up answering questions because half the time a question would be closed shortly after I read it and spent some time thinking of an answer." There is no sense of urgency on Stack Overflow, and a huge percentage of questions are simply unsuitable for the site (much higher than the percentage that actually get closed). Before starting to think of an answer, please invest some time into critiquing whether the question is worth an answer, per the guidelines in stackoverflow.com/help/how-to-answer. Commented Jan 26, 2023 at 15:00
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    That may be your personal experience, but it hasn't been mine. I've seen many questions get reopened across the network, personally helped reopen some of them, and even had one or two of my own reopened.
    – F1Krazy
    Commented Jan 26, 2023 at 15:03
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    "could easily have been corrected with a small edit or a comment asking for clarification" Did you make that edit and voted to reopen?
    – Dharman Mod
    Commented Jan 26, 2023 at 15:04
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    @Omnifarious You do realize there's a 10k rep page that shows reopened questions, right? Whole section there called "Recently Reopened"
    – Machavity Mod
    Commented Jan 26, 2023 at 15:05
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    Stack Overflow is Questions and Answers site! It's not enough to ask a question, but a question needs to be answerable and it's the goal the whole site strives towards. We do not want to close questions because we feel like it. That would defeat the whole purpose of why we are on this site in the first place. If you see someone voting blatantly wrong, flag for moderator attention and we will deal with them.
    – Dharman Mod
    Commented Jan 26, 2023 at 15:07
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    I'm not making excuses; I'm explaining policy. We have much higher standards for quality than you might appreciate, and there is a very good reason for that: this is not a discussion forum, and questions do not exist to help the OP solve a problem, but to help build a searchable library. We edit questions when there is an obvious way to fix them, that doesn't require information that is private to the OP. We VTC them when OP's help is required. OP can, and is expected to, edit them to fix the problem (when they are not duplicates, caused by a typo or otherwise unsalvageable). Commented Jan 26, 2023 at 15:10
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    You should never wait for the asker to provide the necessary information. If the question is unclear, downvote and vote to close. They should have asked the question with all relevant information. If they provide the missing information, the question can be reopened.
    – Dharman Mod
    Commented Jan 26, 2023 at 15:11
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    You are helping people by providing answers. How can you do that if the question is unclear? Stack Overflow is not a help desk. Question-askers are not entitled to personal assistance. Their job is to ask clear questions that can receive helpful answers. If they can't do that then it's on them, not on you.
    – Dharman Mod
    Commented Jan 26, 2023 at 15:19
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    "I'm here to help people" If your understanding of "how to help people" is to provide a personalized debugging service, explain multiple concepts at once and actively respond to feedback from the person who is struggling, then - yes, Stack Overflow is definitionally not the site for you. You want a discussion forum, such as Reddit or Quora. The rest of us are here because we fundamentally believe that "how to help people" most efficiently, takes a radically different form. Commented Jan 26, 2023 at 15:25
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    You are not supposed to be a gatekeeper. You are just not supposed to answer questions that should not be answered. If you want to work with the OP to help them improve their question asking skills, go ahead and do that, but that's not required of you. You can simply move on to another question.
    – Dharman Mod
    Commented Jan 26, 2023 at 15:26
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    You are also supposed to close the question. That does not, in any way, shape or form, interfere with making the question answerable. It simply prevents people from trying to answer the unanswerable. Commented Jan 26, 2023 at 15:27
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As the other side of the "Edit war" this post is probably about, here is my side of the story. I happened across this question where I noticed the following content:

I was using Python 3.2 here back in 2012.

It turns out that BooleanOptionalAction has been added in Python 3.9's version of argparse and solves this problem, and I've changed my accepted answer to the new one. But, other answers on this page should help if you're still using a Python prior to 3.9.

The first line at first appears to be useful but in this case ends up being irrelevant since the question is a "How to" question and applies to multiple versions of Python. The next paragraph is a mixture of some information that really belongs in the answers and some "meta commentary" namely being:

I've changed my accepted answer to the new one

I edited the question and removed these lines. In retrospection my edit summary didn't really cover everything properly and the "meta commentary" part was misunderstood. You later edited the question again and added the following:

The answer for this question before Python 3.9 is different than the answer after. The accepted answer is for Python 3.9 and later.

Given my previous edit summary didn't really convey my reasoning properly I thought you had misunderstood me and edited again to remove these lines along with the edit summary explaining that the answers already covered that information and the question doesn't need to mention that.

To clarify your misunderstanding I don't believe that information about answers being version specific is meta-commentary, I also agree that the information is useful but as already mentioned by other answers here it belongs in the answers and not in the questions.

As a learning for me I'll try to make my edit summaries better in the future.

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    The stuff you removed the first time was chatty and excessive. It made the question more confusing. And I thought, aside from the fact that the version information is something people should be aware of from the start, that it was a good edit. Commented Jan 26, 2023 at 16:52
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    And, on my part, there are ways I could've made it clear the version (and even which version) was important without having it look like a comment on the answers and instead be clearly a part of the question. Commented Jan 26, 2023 at 16:59

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